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STEVE IN SO CAL

Effects of heat on palms(so cal)

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STEVE IN SO CAL

I have three Kentias about 5' tall in morning sun that look like I could bale them and feed them to livestock. Same with some 1 gal Rhopies and Hedyscepes.

On the other hand, my Copernicias think they are home again and are quite perky. Also my Dypsis, Roystonias and Braheas seem to be enjoying themselves...

How about any other socalians???

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quaman58

Steve,

As always, my results this year are mixed. More good than bad though. The heat we've had has been accompanied by the humidity, so I don't get the plant burn I'd otherwise experience. Seems like everything has grown by a foot in the last month. Exeptions that continue to struggle are Hyophorbe indica, a Howea belmoreana & a Chambeyonia. On the other hand, my Leppidorhachis should be wilting, but is growing really nicely. Mixed results, but I guess they always are. That's what makes it interesting!!

B/R's

Bret

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rukiddingme

According to my digital thermometer, it got to 120 (in the shade no less) at my home in La Mesa this last weekend.

Several of my chams, which are under 75% shade cloth (shade sail)  got burned, as did a bunch of my orchids which are also under the cloth.  

None of the palms I have planted in sun suffered severe damage.  A couple Caryota now have sun spotted  leaves, but that seems to be the worst of it.  But,  many of my cycads, including encephalartos, got nuked.  New flushes detroyed, old leaves fried.  This was surprising to me as I though enceph were a tad more heat tolerant, but 120 is pretty hot.  

All of my bananas got cooked, as did some of the vine plants I have.  Lastly, Several common shade trees I have planted are now losing all their leaves, totally burned.

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Kathy

We've been hitting triple F digits for quite a while, much warmer than normal, with humidity varying from about 18-55% or higher.

My Rhopies in 100% shade show no wear, but I don't even give them morning sun here right now.   Haven't marked them for growth, but they look like they're not.  Kentias in 100% shade likewise.  My Cham costaricana is pretty fried in dappled morning sun, but growing fast to recover of course.  My Braheas and Sabals are fine, except my S. mauritiiformis has just a touch of burn in part shade (it was originally sun grown on the coast).    All my Dypsis are fine, and the decipiens I moved to a new area is pushing a new spear that looks healthier than the last.  I won't mention all the seedlings which I've mainly moved indoors to 80-85F.  Bananas look a bit stressed.  Queens are reaching for the moon, tho' I giving them tons of water, along with all the Phoenix roebellenii.  And I'm waiting to plant a bunch of Archontophoenix cunninghamiana into full sun.

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spockvr6

(Kathy @ Jul. 26 2006,11:46)

QUOTE
And I'm waiting to plant a bunch of Archontophoenix cunninghamiana into full sun.

Be careful with those......If they have not seen full sun before, they will fry quickly!  

Of course, if they are large enough, theyll recover and new growth will be acclimated, but you might have to look at a mess for awhile.  I have a couple I have had to visually ignore for a few months now (and they are planted on the north side of my house) :D

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Scott

Exactly, I just posted on another topic of my Archontophoenix which is fried up to a crispy black - even the trunk portion that faces west is orangy/ black. This one is my first casuality. And I'll never make that mistake again.

There's a couple in full sun in my neighborhood, so I don't understand why there's the difference.

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JEFF IN MODESTO

None of my  Archontophoenix have been bothered by temps 110f+ for 5 days... My kentia did get toasted a little on the south side.

Jeff

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spockvr6

(Scott @ Jul. 26 2006,13:40)

QUOTE
Exactly, I just posted on another topic of my Archontophoenix which is fried up to a crispy black - even the trunk portion that faces west is orangy/ black. This one is my first casuality. And I'll never make that mistake again.

There's a couple in full sun in my neighborhood, so I don't understand why there's the difference.

They will acclimate over time.

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Matt in SD

Maybe I should just stay quite, but in Coastal San Diego, we've only had one really hot day.  On Saturday, It definitely got up to about 100, but then at ~3PM a southerly breeze came up and it cooled down to 90 within minutes.  Otherwise we've been in the lower 90s I think with some days not going over 90.  Nights are in the low 70s.  The humidity is GREAT!  The plants are loving it without exception.  

Matt

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DoomsDave

The humidity ROCKS.

Palms love it.

Even the desert ones.

But I dont' think this is even close.

Plenty of water, no dysentery, sounds reggae .. .

dave

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DoomsDave

rukidingme?

Grreat name, tell us more, nice to see you.

Where, exactlyl, are you and what, exactly, do you grow or want to?

dave

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Kathy

(spockvr6 @ Jul. 26 2006,11:53)

QUOTE

(Kathy @ Jul. 26 2006,11:46)

QUOTE
And I'm waiting to plant a bunch of Archontophoenix cunninghamiana into full sun.

Be careful with those......If they have not seen full sun before, they will fry quickly!  

Of course, if they are large enough, theyll recover and new growth will be acclimated, but you might have to look at a mess for awhile.  I have a couple I have had to visually ignore for a few months now (and they are planted on the north side of my house) :D

Thanks Larry.  Yeah, I'm spending some bucks for sun-grown babies with a couple of inches of trunk, but I don't want to press my luck and plant now.  The local nursery even moved some of their stock under light shade cloth for this heat.  But all the homes here with mature ones planted out are OK.  I soooo wanted to save money and start smaller, but then I'd have to erect a shade structure for a long time.  I don't want to wait.  

For you guys in San Diego, what has your humidity been running?

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Matt in SD

Kathy,

I was checking the NWS yesterday and for one of the recent days, at the San Diego Airport sensor, the humidity was between 70 and 85% all day with a high of 84F.  This time of year coastal areas usually have relative humidity around 50% during the warmest part of the day.

Matt

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MattyB

The humidity at midday has been around 40%-50% at my pad (9 miles inland).   Usually it's lower, like 20% or 30%.

Heat on palms status report: :o

Dypsis/Neophaloga "Pink Crownshaft" (5 gal):  All but the two newest leaves are toasted.  This was under 75% shade cloth.  It burnt immediately on Saturday with a high of 105F-108F  (40.5C-42.2C).

Dypsis St. Lucie (small 2 gal): Tip burn on older leaves and the whole thing looks yellow.  It was also under 75% shade cloth.  I'm not sure this is entirely from the heat.  I decided to bareroot it and give it some new soil and found only one main root actully showing signs of growth...no new adventitious roots forming.  So it got a Daconil drench and repotted.

Archontophoenix myolensis (in ground 6" clear trunk):  This is burning on all but the 2 newer leaves.  It's in full sun and has been since last summer but this summer is taking it's toll.  Still growing fast though.

All others are loving it.  As Dave would say, "Go Roystonia Go!!"

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spockvr6

(Matt in SD @ Jul. 28 2006,13:03)

QUOTE
Kathy,

I was checking the NWS yesterday and for one of the recent days, at the San Diego Airport sensor, the humidity was between 70 and 85% all day with a high of 84F.  This time of year coastal areas usually have relative humidity around 50% during the warmest part of the day.

Matt

Hot dang...84F and 70% RH is a dewpoint of about 73F and that is HUMID for SD!

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MattyB

Hot dang is right.  Just for the record it's 84F with a relative humidity of 67% here at work at 1:00 pm. I am sticky.  This is rare.

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elHoagie

(MattyB @ Jul. 28 2006,13:44)

QUOTE
Dypsis/Neophaloga "Pink Crownshaft" (5 gal):  All but the two newest leaves are toasted.  This was under 75% shade cloth.  It burnt immediately on Saturday with a high of 105F-108F  (40.5C-42.2C).

Hmm.  My Dypsis "pink crownshaft" under 30% shade cloth in my cold frame didn't suffer at all in the heat.  My highs were similar to yours.  Did the soil dry out on yours maybe?

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DoomsDave

Hmm.

Gonna have to drag out the 50% for my Rhopies.  Anyone got some honey-mustard dipping sauce?  :(

dave

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