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DesertCoconut

Syagrus species for Phoenix, Arizona

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DesertCoconut

I'm looking for advice on growing other species of syagrus other than romanzoffiana here in Phoenix. I really like the look of a queen palm, but only the ones I've seen in CA and FL. By the end of our hot summers, they just look tattered and burnt no matter how much water and fertilizer you give them. I did plant a couple 15 gallon mule palms (butia x romanzoffiana) this spring and I'm excited to watch them grow.

Does anybody have experience with any other syagrus species or hybrids that do well here in our desert climate? Coronata? Picrophylla? schizophylla?

Comments on cold hardiness and growth rate would be appreciated as well.

Thanks!

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RichAZ

I'm here in Gilbert and growing a few Syagrus hybrids.  I have mules and also Coco Queens which are a nice looking Romanzoffiana x Schizophylla cross. The Coco Queens are much faster than the Mules and just look fuller all around.  I have all of them near the pool and they get full day sun which none of them are overly fond of.  The fronds tend to bronze as the summer goes on but they keep growing.  I fertilize with Palmgain every other month in the growing season and water generously.  It's only their third year in the ground so I'm hoping that they put on some serous size this year.    I'll post a pic tomorrow.  

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DesertCoconut

Thanks. I'm looking forward to the photos.

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RichAZ

Finally got out into the yard this morning to run off a rabbit that was vandalizing the garden and remembered to take some pics.  This one is a Coconut Queen that I bought as a 15 gal from Phil at Jungle Music.  It's carrying a lot of fronds and the trunk has been getting noticeably thicker.

CocoQueen2.jpg

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DesertCoconut

Looks nice!  Thanks for sharing.  I bought a few smaller trees from Phil.  One of these days I need to make a trip out there and drive back with a moving van full of larger ones. 

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RichAZ

That's a great idea!  I've flown out to SD for business 3x over the past couple years and driven back in a rental truck or minivan packed with plants.  Not something a lot of non-palm people get...

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ErikSJI

Let me know how this Coconut queen does for you in AZ we just started doing this cross and intend on doing it yearly now.

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RichAZ

Sure thing Erik, happy to share my experience.  I have 2 Coconut Queens here in Gilbert, AZ.  One is pictured earlier in the thread and I've included the other with this post.  Both are doing very well with our heat but tend to bronze a bit as the intense (full, all day) Summer sun wears on them.  They seem to grow strongly most of the year and are each pushing multiple spears today.  Trunks have easily doubled or tripled in diameter over the past two years in the ground.  No nutritional deficiencies noted but I fertilize with Palmgain so I wouldn't expect any.  No issues with cold but both of the past two Winters were really mild.  I like this hybrid a lot.  I have a Mule as well but the Coconut Queen is much faster growing and carries more fronds.  I'm also growing a Jubaea x Butia hybrid that seems very happy here as well.  If you want me to try anything (please?), here in AZ, just PM me and I'd be happy to stick it in the ground and see what happens :  ) 

CQ1c.jpg

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RichAZ

Here is a shot of the Mule for comparison and I think it shows the different growth rates pretty well.  The Mule has been in the ground almost a full season longer and was planted as a 30" box as opposed to the Coconut Queens which came in 15g pots.  The Mule was chunkier and the CQs were taller but the CQs' trunks are now comparable if not larger than the Mule's.

Mule2.jpg

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