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GottmitAlex

Show your B. Alfredii: Pics & age.

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GottmitAlex

Post a pic of your planted Beccariophoenix Alfredii palm. Please mention age, if possible describe its size and soil type.

I'll start with mine.

3 years old. About 3 feet in height to the tip of its tallest frond. Pure sand.

 

 

20170501_210905.jpg

58d5ba40a385d_20170324_165638PT7(Large).

Edited by GottmitAlex
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steve99

  I planted mine sometime in 2014 in relatively rich soil and plenty of natural mulch.     Here's a couple of pics taken 18 months apart.

 

Sept 2015

4a069927.jpg

March 2017

a64174bb.jpg

 

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sonoranfans

Warning this palm gets quite large, you need to give it room.  When I see them near a fence I chuckle a bit.  Here is one of my (3) alfredii, which will be 7 years in the ground from a 3 gallon 2' tall seedling.  Mine is just starting to trunk(<1' trunk).  I understand the trunk can be very thick, almost 3' thick with leaf bases.

Alfredii_snip (2).PNG

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donalt

what a beauty that alfredii is in palmetto, florida!!    when i planted my 5 gallon alfredii 4 years ago, i put it too close to the side of my house. it's growing so well that i hate to move it, but i can see that it will overtake the spot within a year or two....are they transplantable without damage or risk of death??

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DoomsDave

Here's some of mine.

Babies in fivers about 12" or 30 cm tall in a year or so from little liners.

IMG_2418.thumb.JPG.aa6642b5c8380ca315182IMG_2419.thumb.JPG.ccfb73819a8e3d9ce50af

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DoomsDave

This one was the IMG_2421.thumb.JPG.99cd718c53d34bbdb767aIMG_2422.thumb.JPG.5f65ce510f7b598a5b69bsize of the babies back in 2009. Now it's about 15 feet 5 M tall not trunking yet.

MUCHO AGUA!

 

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Hammer
3 hours ago, donalt said:

what a beauty that alfredii is in palmetto, florida!!    when i planted my 5 gallon alfredii 4 years ago, i put it too close to the side of my house. it's growing so well that i hate to move it, but i can see that it will overtake the spot within a year or two....are they transplantable without damage or risk of death??

Do you have a picture? 

If you want it to survive I would suggest digging a massive rootball.

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redant

IMG_2727.JPG

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DoomsDave
On 5/1/2017, 10:50:07, GottmitAlex said:

Post a pic of your planted Beccariophoenix Alfredii palm. Please mention age, if possible describe its size and soil type.

I'll start with mine.

3 years old. About 3 feet in height to the tip of its tallest frond. Pure sand.

 

 

20170501_210905.jpg

58d5ba40a385d_20170324_165638PT7(Large).

Is that disco lighting in the first picture? :)

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sonoranfans

these palms dont need really rich soil.  Mine was ammended root ball zone in nearly pure sand with some clay at 3' deep, the ammendment area was big enough for a 3 gallon palm.  I have put down top mulch one a year, the soil would not be considered rich by any means.  These get deep roots and are very drought tolerant, perhaps the most drought tolerant feather palms in my yard.  I have had irrigation failures and 60 day droughts heavily overlap.  this palm showed almost no stress while mule palms looked notably stressed, dropping 3-4 extra leaves.  this palm lost no leaves to drought..  Mine is close to 20' overall, perhap a foot or so shy.  I have two others, all from Mike Evans on this board.  The other two are in part shade that are 12-15', all were planted at the same time in 2011.  they grow well in shade but not as many leaves or as fast growing.  This is a low maintenance palm for me, fertilize 2x a year with ~3 lbs of florikan palm special.

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Tropicdoc
6 hours ago, redant said:

IMG_2727.JPG

This is the first B. alfredii in cultivation that I've seen with a trunk. Without the leaf bases what would the diameter of that trunk be? 3 ft as described above? And, did you lean that palm on purpose?

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Tropicdoc

Ditto on the drought tolerance. I forgot to water my container ranch for a few weeks. These were the only palms that showed no stress.

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Mike Evans
54 minutes ago, sonoranfans said:

these palms dont need really rich soil.  Mine was ammended root ball zone in nearly pure sand with some clay at 3' deep, the ammendment area was big enough for a 3 gallon palm.  I have put down top mulch one a year, the soil would not be considered rich by any means.  These get deep roots and are very drought tolerant, perhaps the most drought tolerant feather palms in my yard.  I have had irrigation failures and 60 day droughts heavily overlap.  this palm showed almost no stress while mule palms looked notably stressed, dropping 3-4 extra leaves.  this palm lost no leaves to drought..  Mine is close to 20' overall, perhap a foot or so shy.  I have two others, all from Mike Evans on this board.  The other two are in part shade that are 12-15', all were planted at the same time in 2011.  they grow well in shade but not as many leaves or as fast growing.  This is a low maintenance palm for me, fertilize 2x a year with ~3 lbs of florikan palm special.

Tom, your B. alfredii's show that these palms grow faster in full Sun than partial Sun.  Something I have seen time and time again from others I have sold.  The ones I have in the garden are under palm canopy and definately slower growing than yours, even though they were larger than the ones you originally bought.  Mine get regular irrigation and fert, but lack the full Sun environment.  They do tend to be a bit wobbly in the ground when they are grown under canopy or NOT full Sun and that may be why you see the "coconut curve" to the trunk.  Yours look fantastic!  These have been in the ground about 5 years.  I would think they will pick up speed when a trunk develops, like most palms.  These palms cannot get enough Sun, pretty tough.

DSCN4299.JPG

DSCN4300.JPG

DSCN4301.JPG

DSCN4302.JPG

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Gtlevine
On ‎5‎/‎1‎/‎2017‎ ‎10‎:‎50‎:‎07‎, GottmitAlex said:

Post a pic of your planted Beccariophoenix Alfredii palm. Please mention age, if possible describe its size and soil type.

I'll start with mine.

3 years old. About 3 feet in height to the tip of its tallest frond. Pure sand.

 

 

20170501_210905.jpg

58d5ba40a385d_20170324_165638PT7(Large).

That Alfredii will get wider than the space you planted it in. It is a massive palm and it will tear down your fence as well.

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mike in kurtistown

Here's my picture from east Hawaii Island, riding mower for scale. (Look at that grass, really needs mowing!) All Beccariophoenix species really like it here, grow like weeds. These were planted from 2-gal pots in November 2012.

590a43db17322_Beccariophoenixalfredii_ML

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GottmitAlex
56 minutes ago, Gtlevine said:

That Alfredii will get wider than the space you planted it in. It is a massive palm and it will tear down your fence as well.

I was made aware of that many times in a different thread.

The worse part about it is that the garden is atop the edge of a 26ft rock retaining wall. So once the Alfredii gets the massive 4-5 foot trunk, it might tip over...

The pics are a bit misleading since the actual wall is still a foot away from the cinder blocks. Currently, there is 1.2ft of distance between the cinder block and the center of the Alfredii. Add to that another foot to the actual wall. That is roughly 2ft of radius. And from the center of the Alfredii to the concrete (opposite direction) there is another foot. When the time comes, I will chip out a half moon from the concrete to accommodate the Alfredii just as I did with my Washingtonia. 

I really do not think a B. Alfredii's true (clean) base makes it to 3ft in diameter. But if it does, I'll take out the cinder blocks. If at that point it grows another foot in diameter, i'll have to re position the fence on the middle or outer edge of the rock retaining wall. 

Based on all the pictures I have seen online of CLEAN B. Alfredii trunks, they are not anywhere close to a meter wide. They're probably in the P. Dactilyfera category. 

I guess folks seem to think that Alfredii's have trunks with widths as CIDP's....

 

 

 

Edited by GottmitAlex

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GottmitAlex
7 hours ago, DoomsDave said:

Is that disco lighting in the first picture? :)


That's the 30 watt LED grow lights for the Coconuts... lol

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sonoranfans

When grown, with leaf bases almost 3'.  chck Pete belaskys in this thread, its only starting to trunk so it will get wider I think.http://www.palmtalk.org/forum/index.php?/topic/49135-biggest-beccariophoenix-alfredii-north-of-monterey/   its the first pic in the 18th post.  By the way Ive seen clean CIDP trunks  over 3' so no they are not the same.  But check petes out and consider nobody has a full gorwn specimen in cultivation.  

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GottmitAlex
1 minute ago, sonoranfans said:

When grown, with leaf bases almost 3'.  chck Pete belaskys in this thread, its only starting to trunk so it will get wider I think.http://www.palmtalk.org/forum/index.php?/topic/49135-biggest-beccariophoenix-alfredii-north-of-monterey/   its the first pic in the 18th post.  By the way Ive seen clean CIDP trunks  over 3' so no they are not the same.  But check petes out an dconsider nobody had a full gorwn specimen in cultivation.

My point exactly.

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sonoranfans
14 minutes ago, GottmitAlex said:

My point exactly.

 

8 hours ago, redant said:

IMG_2727.JPG

looks skinny compared to mine, and mine has a lot less trunk.  perhaps its not well fed or the heavy shade elongates them makes them slim.  I have royals that are 30" thick at 2' height, though ive seen some really scrawny ones planted in public places where the roots are limited by concrete sidewalk..  I expect the healthy BA's are going to be a lot bigger as well.

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Alan_Tampa

8 years, maybe more from a 5 gallon, USF plant show, Chuck Griesan 

20170503_184634.jpg

Edited by Alan_Tampa
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Alan_Tampa

3 years from a 7 gallon,  from Mike Evans

1493854090769716957748.jpg

Edited by Alan_Tampa
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foxtail

trioderob style:

"Best thread ever" :D

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donalt

Planted September 2014; 5 gal. Full sun

IMG_9979.JPG

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Jdiaz31089

Planted this year from a 15 gallon, but the tag has a date from 2013. which i would imagine is the germination date. That would make this palm 4 years old from (presumably) seed. 

The soil is rich, sandy loam. 

20170503_202147.thumb.jpg.d48255ee9c0b86

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Jdiaz31089

Here's a picture of mine in better lighting. Lots of new active growth on this one since I planted it sometime in February. 

20170504_072500.thumb.jpg.6719697ff499e0

20170504_072448.thumb.jpg.3d8ab8445f49e2

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sonoranfans

It sure looks like they are slower in shade.  I planted 3 6+ years ago, all the same size initially.  the biggest(18-19' overall) I already posted the pic here  Here is my smallest, the one in the most shade(2-3 hrs filtered sun each day).  It is about 11' over all in height (the fence -10' away- behind it is 7' in height).  It isnt trunking and holds about half the number of leaves.  It is wind protected so the leaves are more symmetrical than the one in sun.  The big one had a defoliation due to frost and cold its first year, but it handily outgrew this one which was not damaged since it was under canopy.

Alfredii_shade.PNG

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sonoranfans
On 5/2/2017, 6:40:21, donalt said:

what a beauty that alfredii is in palmetto, florida!!    when i planted my 5 gallon alfredii 4 years ago, i put it too close to the side of my house. it's growing so well that i hate to move it, but i can see that it will overtake the spot within a year or two....are they transplantable without damage or risk of death??

Donalt, I transplanted my biggest one within 6 months of it going into the ground, others on this board have had setback issues with bigger ones.  LOL! I had planted it ithin 2' of a fence and some experienced growers here warned me it was going to be huge, so I dug it up.  Even within 6 months mine had a some roots that went ~30" deep from a 3 gallon pot, so these palms can grow pretty deep roots.  I tried to save as much of the long roots as possible when I transplanted mine. I suggest smaller the better the better as the more you wait, the more established the roots will be.  If you do transplant I suggest you take at least half the leaves off to prevent dessication of the plant while it grows new roots. 

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LJG
22 hours ago, Mike Evans said:

Tom, your B. alfredii's show that these palms grow faster in full Sun than partial Sun.  Something I have seen time and time again from others I have sold.  The ones I have in the garden are under palm canopy and definately slower growing than yours, even though they were larger than the ones you originally bought.  Mine get regular irrigation and fert, but lack the full Sun environment.  They do tend to be a bit wobbly in the ground when they are grown under canopy or NOT full Sun and that may be why you see the "coconut curve" to the trunk.  Yours look fantastic!  These have been in the ground about 5 years.  I would think they will pick up speed when a trunk develops, like most palms.  These palms cannot get enough Sun, pretty tough.

DSCN4299.JPG

DSCN4300.JPG

DSCN4301.JPG

DSCN4302.JPG

Looks great Mike. Well on it's way.

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LJG
21 hours ago, mike in kurtistown said:

Here's my picture from east Hawaii Island, riding mower for scale. (Look at that grass, really needs mowing!) All Beccariophoenix species really like it here, grow like weeds. These were planted from 2-gal pots in November 2012.

590a43db17322_Beccariophoenixalfredii_ML

Well grown Mike. A happy green. Nice work. Now you just need to weed :) 

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redant
On ‎5‎/‎3‎/‎2017‎ ‎5‎:‎30‎:‎37‎, sonoranfans said:

 

looks skinny compared to mine, and mine has a lot less trunk.  perhaps its not well fed or the heavy shade elongates them makes them slim.  I have royals that are 30" thick at 2' height, though ive seen some really scrawny ones planted in public places where the roots are limited by concrete sidewalk..  I expect the healthy BA's are going to be a lot bigger as well.

It's got a pretty good size trunk but it is in a lot of shade. Palm is about 5 years in the ground.

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redant
On ‎5‎/‎3‎/‎2017‎ ‎3‎:‎26‎:‎20‎, Tropicdoc said:

This is the first B. alfredii in cultivation that I've seen with a trunk. Without the leaf bases what would the diameter of that trunk be? 3 ft as described above? And, did you lean that palm on purpose?

Base is 49" around, I didn't lean it on purpose, I find it hard to keep them from getting tossed around in the wind, hence the stakes. Those royals behind it are massive.

 

Edited by redant

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Palmaceae

Here is mine in a span of 2 years.

 

20150405_170634.jpg

20170423_151303.jpg

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GottmitAlex
2 hours ago, redant said:

Base is 49" around, I didn't lean it on purpose, I find it hard to keep them from getting tossed around in the wind, hence the stakes. Those royals behind it are massive.

 

So the diameter is roughly 15.6" ?

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donalt

Sonorafans, thank you for that information....I think the prudent move is to leave the palm in its current location, and buy another one to plant elsewhere. Right now, my alfredii is growing so vigorously. I want to track its progress as it attains some decent size. The thought of harming or slowing the growth at this point is keeping me from transplanting.

 

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sonoranfans
18 hours ago, Palmaceae said:

Here is mine in a span of 2 years.

 

20150405_170634.jpg

20170423_151303.jpg

Looks too close to that sabal.  This one gets lots of sun, it will get big. My own BA's that grew in shade small bases and about half the leaves of the one grown in sun.  Im starting to think the shade grown ones are not going to get so big.. The shade grown ones also have more slender and darker green leaflets, more delicate.  It could be that its a sun  lover and that full sun transforms this palm into a beast.  

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Palmaceae
3 hours ago, sonoranfans said:

Looks too close to that sabal.  This one gets lots of sun, it will get big. My own BA's that grew in shade small bases and about half the leaves of the one grown in sun.  Im starting to think the shade grown ones are not going to get so big.. The shade grown ones also have more slender and darker green leaflets, more delicate.  It could be that its a sun  lover and that full sun transforms this palm into a beast.  

Yes it is close but that's ok with me, as I have limited room and I love the jungle look. Plus that bed is close to my septic tank so I can not extend that bed.

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dmc

4" plant from floribunda 4/15. 

20170505_182303.jpg

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Insomniac411

Not sure the age. Bought from Unique Palms in Jacksonville Florida. Planted in native Jax soil which is a sand soil mix. Definitely my new favorite palm. Hoping it can survive 9a. Hear that the older they get the more cold tolerant. It has 1ft of trunk, came from 30 gal pot. I may be over precautious with this one this year but got it in soil at the perfect time of year so it should be well rooted by the time the cold comes around.

20170504_193007-747x1328.jpg

20170504_165024-1328x747.jpg

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Exotic Life
On 2017-5-5 23:52:55, Palmaceae said:

Yes it is close but that's ok with me, as I have limited room and I love the jungle look. Plus that bed is close to my septic tank so I can not extend that bed.

Wow, that Royal is fast! :)

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