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oviedotreefarm

North Central FL Coconuts

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oviedotreefarm

I've seen a few post about the northern ranges of coconuts and when I saw these I figured I'd share.  This is Sanford FL, a couple of hundred yards south of Lake Monroe.  Looking at google earth they were planted in 2013.  They have grown quite a bit since then. 

street view:

https://www.google.com/maps/@28.8115585,-81.2515015,3a,75y,250.93h,78.65t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sviAF9tkw_-Cg7qE4cNqmfg!2e0!7i13312!8i6656!6m1!1e1

6214.jpeg

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RedRabbit

Thanks for sharing! If they were planted in 2013 they haven't really been tested yet... Judging by Streetview, the owner put these coconuts in as a replacement for adonidia they lost in 2010. They'll be in for another heartbreak sooner or later but they look great now. :) 

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Zeeth

I'm surprised they've lasted that long!

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donalt

beautiful, yes! but it's true, we haven't had cold damaging temps for 6 or 7 years. i know that location is very well protected by lake monroe. several blocks of homes there have tropical plantings that are quite beautiful.

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kinzyjr

Wonderful palms!  Hope they take measures to get them through the cold spells.

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Dave-Vero

Lake Monroe could provide a bit of protection, but Vero Beach had a coconut massacre in 2010-2011.  Away from the beach, about half died.  The survivors (including one across the street that also survived a massive attack by spirallng whitefly) are now booming.  It's amazing how much height they can gain in seven years.  

 

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ck_in_fla

Not far from this location, I saw some large Roystonea that were installed in the parking lot at what I think is an RV dealership.  This dealership is visible from the northbound lanes of Interstate 4 just before you cross Lake Monroe and cross from Seminole into Volusia County.

Does anyone know if those are still there?  I'm guessing they are as the sight is almost right on the southern edge of Lake Monroe.

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kinzyjr

There should now be one at Leu Gardens in Orlando.  We'll see how long a Jamaican Tall can make it there.

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ck_in_fla

The Leu Gardens site benefits from the large lake and the Urban Heat Island effect.

Eric has detailed all of the exotic palms there and in the immediate area around the gardens.

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Mr. Coconut Palm

Those are nice looking coconut palms.  They appear to be healthy Green Malayan Dwarfs.  I will be posting some photos of mature REALLY big (by Texas standards) Mexican Tall coconut palms with nuts on them Brownsville, Texas in the Rio Grande Valley, along with a beautiful juvenile Green Hawaiian Tall there that I saw when I was down there for a Palm Society meeting yesterday.

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Mr. Coconut Palm

By the way, the Sanford, FL Green  Malayans in the photos are about as big as we could expect Green Malayans to get where I live, but they can get a little bigger in the RGV south of me.  Talls, can get to be about 25ft. tall here where I live, but they can get to be about 45ft. to 50ft. tall in overall height in the RGV.

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kinzyjr
20 hours ago, ck_in_fla said:

The Leu Gardens site benefits from the large lake and the Urban Heat Island effect.

Eric has detailed all of the exotic palms there and in the immediate area around the gardens.

Not to mention a high canopy that tends to trap heat from the ground.  Definitely a perfect storm for cold protection.

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jreich85

Ck_in_fla, the last time I drove through that area on I-4 a couple months ago, the royals were still there. 

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ck_in_fla

It would be hard to get a picture from I-4.  The next time I am driving in that area, and have the time, I will see what I can do to get some pictures.

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Eric in Orlando

Those coconuts are growing well. That is a nice warm pocket being on the south side of Lake Monroe/St. John's River. I've driven around in that neighborhood and seen some Wodyetia, Ptychosperma elegans and Roystonea that survived 2009-10. There is also a big Pandanus utilis.

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donalt

Royal palms at I-4/Lake Monroe are all thriving and robust.

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ck_in_fla

Those Royals should be fairly large by now.  As I recall, they were not that small when they were installed.

I will need to see if I can get up there to get some pictures to share.  I'm not really sure how to get there using the streets.  I suppose I will just head up 17-92 and then turn left and proceed along the shore of Lake Monroe towards I-4.

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Reeverse

Port Orange Florida  Royals just installed. Just west of US1. Nice to see those common south Florida palms way up here. 

20170428_184619.jpg

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ck_in_fla
10 hours ago, Reeverse said:

Port Orange Florida  Royals just installed. Just west of US1. Nice to see those common south Florida palms way up here. 

20170428_184619.jpg

Nice!  I get up that way frequently.  I will need to check those the next time I'm up there.

There is an automobile dealership on the West side of US 1 just North of New Smyrna Beach that has had a row (3 or 4) large Royal palms growing there for a number of years.  I believe they have been there at least 10 years.  So, they survived the cold of 2010.  I believe that once they have some size to them, Roystonea are more hardy to cold than when they are small.

I live in Winter Springs (just North of Orlando) and I planted a small Royal palm in 2001.  All the years it was small, I protected it anytime the forecast lows were 28 or lower.  In this area, that only happened once or twice in a normal winter.  The last few years, it hasn't been below 33 or 34.  Once the tree was too large to protect, I just left it to the elements.  Today, 16 years after planting it, my Roystonea is about 40 feet tall, towering over the roof of my home.  Because it is so tall, I believe it will take a cold event like 1983 or 1985 to impact it.  I will try to get a current picture of this tree and post it so you can see what I am talking about.

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Bill H2DB

  Those Royals in NSB at the old Dodge dealer site have been there for many years , and did go thru 2010. They facing the north winds too , as

they are on the North side of the place , and its open directly to the NSB airport .

 

Here is a pic of Royals in Ormond Beach , on the beachside , that also have been there for many years . This pic is from not too long after 

Hurricane Matthew , hence the ravaged look . This was the home of a long time IPS member , who , I think is now deceased .

  No Cocos , though .

   Besides the quite nice Cocos that " Reeverse"  found in Daytona Beach Shores recently , there's a few smaller ones hereabouts , but no

long term survivors that I know about .

 

30799313161_0e5d67e5f3_b.jpgRoyal in OB post Matt 2 by Bill H, on Flickr

 

 

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RedRabbit

These royals have been in inland Port Orange since at least the 90s:

https://www.google.com/maps/@29.1096626,-81.0071374,3a,75y,215.86h,101.26t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sZQOp6fdofyTw3ALsxYPoxw!2e0!7i13312!8i6656

 

Mature royals are pretty tough palms. There aren't too many in my part of town, but I've noticed a lot being planted recently. :) 

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ck_in_fla

That is definitely consistent with what I have seen here in the Orlando area.  If you are prepared to protect them until they get some size to them, they can be grown in protected locations in the Orlando metropolitan area and perhaps even a little North of here (e.g. Lake Monroe, Sanford, New Smyrna Beach, Port Orange).

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ck_in_fla

OK, here are two pictures of my Roystonea here in Winter Springs, FL.  As I said, I am just to the North and East of the Orlando metropolitan area.  The tree is sited between my home and my neighbor's home.  In addition, I am on the Southern side of Lake Jessup, a large body of fresh water that is actually part of the St. John's River system.  Another fact about Lake Jessup is that it has one of the highest concentrations of Alligators in Florida.

When you consider the length of time this tree has been in the ground (since April 2001) and all of the cold weather events it has endured, I think it looks pretty good for being significantly North of it's traditional range.

IMG_1181.JPG

IMG_1182.JPG

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Reeverse

It looks great.

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Reeverse

Found the ones Red Rabbit was talking about in Port Orange. They're about 5 miles from the ocean. 

20170522_131049.jpg

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ck_in_fla

Those look really great.  The Royals just south of the NSB airport (at the car dealership) are evidence that Roystonea can be grown long term in that area.

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PalmTreeDude

I actually sometimes get irked when there are no "exotic" palms in places where they can grow, especially in Central Florida, so much potential for amazing palms but instead Washingtonia and palms like that are planted.

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ck_in_fla

Downtown Orlando is starting to buck this trend.  If you head into downtown from the East side of town and exit the 408 at Rosalind Ave., you will find yourself on South street.  On the right, there are a number of really tropical palms.  There is a very large Royal palm.  There were two in that location, but one of them was removed recently.  Not sure why.  There are also what looks like a Thatch palm and some kind of Archontophoenix.  If you continue West on South Street, as you approach Orange Avenue, you will see some really tropical palms planted at City Hall (ahead and to the left).  Ahead and to the right, you will see Bottle palms in a number of planters along Orange Avenue.  In recent years, the City of Orlando has started to use some of the less used palms in their landscaping projects.

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kinzyjr

It was the highlight of my life just making it as far as North Carolina and seeing my first sabal palmetto 15 years ago.  Being in Central Florida between Tampa and Orlando is a blessing compared to shoveling out from under 7 feet of snow.  I like seeing all of the interesting tropical palms, but eventually, a 1989 or 2010 type event might damage or kill the plants.  I personally dread the day where some of my coconut palms may succumb to a hard freeze, even with some level of protection.  It's comforting to think that there are native palms that have stood the test of time, along with imports that are perfectly hardy here.

It's nice to see that there are a few hidden gems north of Orlando, especially near the coast and near large lakes.  Thanks to everyone hunting down pictures of the palms, especially the ones that made it through the 2010 event.  It's been a real eye-opener!

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Sandy Loam

I don't know the whole Orlando Metro area, and I don't know the areas north of town which are discussed in this thread.  But, to your comment, CK, I do know the areas east, Southeast and northeast of downtown. These residential areas are replete with all kinds of tender tropical plants, including multiple species of tropical crownshaft palms by the hundreds -- and in very mature sizes too.  The only thing you won't find in this area is a coconut palm. 

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ck_in_fla
6 hours ago, Sandy Loam said:

I don't know the whole Orlando Metro area, and I don't know the areas north of town which are discussed in this thread.  But, to your comment, CK, I do know the areas east, Southeast and northeast of downtown. These residential areas are replete with all kinds of tender tropical plants, including multiple species of tropical crownshaft palms by the hundreds -- and in very mature sizes too.  The only thing you won't find in this area is a coconut palm. 

Head out to East Colonial Drive in Orlando and specifically the Smashburger restaurant.  In front of this establishment on the South side of the road are two mature Coconut palms that have been there a number of years.  It is across from the Orlando Fashion Square Mall.  In this case, the urban heat island is no doubt responsible for these trees being there...

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RedRabbit
16 hours ago, Reeverse said:

Found the ones Red Rabbit was talking about in Port Orange. They're about 5 miles from the ocean. 

20170522_131049.jpg

I'm glad to see they're doing so well, thanks for sharing!

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Matthew92

I saw they planted coconuts in the landscaping at the new "Volcano Bay" water park in Orlando.

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Palmaceae
55 minutes ago, Opal92 said:

I saw they planted coconuts in the landscaping at the new "Volcano Bay" water park in Orlando.

Yes I just saw that as I was in Orlando all last week for work.  

Also here is one that has been there for many years at Bob Marley in Universal. I remember seeing this coconut several years ago here.

 

IMG_20170525_203209853.jpg

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Sandy Loam

I have never been to Discovery Cove theme park in Orlando, but I believe there are mature coconut trees there as well.  I also saw several coconut trees at SeaWorld theme park in Orlando, so I suppose they can be grown in Orlando, although coconuts are not common landscape items there.  This may be because coconut trees are simply not available at the Orlando nurseries which I have visited.

In Miami, coconut trees are literally everywhere you look due to increased availability and the fact that people see it as "normal" to grow coconuts there.

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Reeverse

I think the Bob Marley Cocos is pre 2010? 

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Bill H2DB
11 hours ago, Sandy Loam said:

I have never been to Discovery Cove theme park in Orlando, but I believe there are mature coconut trees there as well.  I also saw several coconut trees at SeaWorld theme park in Orlando, so I suppose they can be grown in Orlando, although coconuts are not common landscape items there.  This may be because coconut trees are simply not available at the Orlando nurseries which I have visited.

In Miami, coconut trees are literally everywhere you look due to increased availability and the fact that people see it as "normal" to grow coconuts there.

   The Daytona Beach  Home Depot , near the Speedway , has been having Cocos this Spring .   Don't know if the Port Orange HD has them , but it most

likely does .   Not a nursery for sure , but.......

 

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Palmaceae
4 hours ago, Reeverse said:

I think the Bob Marley Cocos is pre 2010? 

I think you are correct as the last time I was there was before 2010 and it was there.

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Eric in Orlando

I was out at Universal's City Walk last night for the Blondie concert at Hard Rock. We parked in the south garage and I could see the coconut at Bob Marleys. 

_20170810_130038.JPG

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Eric in Orlando

DSC_0185.JPG

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