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Jeff_Cabinda

chamaedorea tepejilote outside growing

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Jeff_Cabinda

I am growing chamaedorea tepejilote outside. They are 30 cm tall. Anyone as experienced it? I read direct sun can be fatal. True or exaggerated? 

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Palms4Steve

Filtered light is best.

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XYZ

There are very well-defined wild and domesticated versions of tepes. There is a wild lowland form that is somewhat rare in cultivation that is wet tropical, shady and colonial, and a wild highland form that is wet cool-growing, shade-dependent and single trunked. The domesticates that are now believed to have been subject to thousands of years of artificial selection by the highland Maya for their edible male infls are cool growers and will tolerate full sun all day where there is afternoon cloud cover during the warmest seasons of the year. I have seen many grown as fully-exposed garden plants in Central America and - while they look like crap with burned and drooped pinnae - they appear to grow fairly well under such conditions. Generally a wise idea to start all young chamaedoreas in light to medium shade.

J

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Jeff_Cabinda
On Wed Apr 12 2017 16:59:30 GMT+0100, stone jaguar said:

There are very well-defined wild and domesticated versions of tepes. There is a wild lowland form that is somewhat rare in cultivation that is wet tropical, shady and colonial, and a wild highland form that is wet cool-growing, shade-dependent and single trunked. The domesticates that are now believed to have been subject to thousands of years of artificial selection by the highland Maya for their edible male infls are cool growers and will tolerate full sun all day where there is afternoon cloud cover during the warmest seasons of the year. I have seen many grown as fully-exposed garden plants in Central America and - while they look like crap with burned and drooped pinnae - they appear to grow fairly well under such conditions. Generally a wise idea to start all young chamaedoreas in light to medium shade.

J

Interim solution

20170707_113849.jpg

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Missi

I'm growing a trio in an area that gets some filtered direct sun and they never have a nice deep green color, always yellowed - due to too much sun, darn it! However, this was the first year my trio created infructescences. I keep plenty of peat and mulch over the roots because they're sensitive to nematodes.

The photo of the trio is from Feb. of this year, the photo of the infructescences is from May or early June of this year.

ctej2.jpg

ctej.jpg

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Missi
On 4/12/2017, 11:59:30, stone jaguar said:

There are very well-defined wild and domesticated versions of tepes. There is a wild lowland form that is somewhat rare in cultivation that is wet tropical, shady and colonial, and a wild highland form that is wet cool-growing, shade-dependent and single trunked. The domesticates that are now believed to have been subject to thousands of years of artificial selection by the highland Maya for their edible male infls are cool growers and will tolerate full sun all day where there is afternoon cloud cover during the warmest seasons of the year. I have seen many grown as fully-exposed garden plants in Central America and - while they look like crap with burned and drooped pinnae - they appear to grow fairly well under such conditions. Generally a wise idea to start all young chamaedoreas in light to medium shade.

J

Please see my pics above. Are you able to tell what variety mine are?

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Cedric

Bumping this up because I just love this palm. To me it screams tropics more than anything else palm wise. While not rare or unusual they still have the edge and look. It's those lovely wide drooping leaflets and green bamboo like trunks all in a handy size that looks fantastic in a clump or single. They ooze the tropical look but aren't as difficult as most tropicals. Mine easily take down to 10%C for a few weeks no problem.  When the trunks are wet they shine and the white rings between just set them off magnificently.

In my experience with this one it doesn't mind full sun at all if your humidity and rainfall is high, and I mean high except for in the cool season but it's still advisable to water on warmer days. However as seedlings they need shade definitely. In hot dry climates they would need shade as well, a humid moist micro climate.

They grow around here like weeds. Once a few are planted and fruiting they self seeding everywhere. As common as they are where they are planted they are not nearly planted enough IMO. Quick growing too. So if you want the tropical look and quickly this is the go to palm of choice. 

I'm not sure what selection we have around here as I collect seedlings and plant them where I want them but the leaflets are very wide and thin, the light shinning through that green is magic.

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akamu

 

21 hours ago, Cedric said:

Bumping this up because I just love this palm. To me it screams tropics more than anything else palm wise. While not rare or unusual they still have the edge and look. It's those lovely wide drooping leaflets and green bamboo like trunks all in a handy size that looks fantastic in a clump or single. They ooze the tropical look but aren't as difficult as most tropicals. Mine easily take down to 10%C for a few weeks no problem.  When the trunks are wet they shine and the white rings between just set them off magnificently.

In my experience with this one it doesn't mind full sun at all if your humidity and rainfall is high, and I mean high except for in the cool season but it's still advisable to water on warmer days. However as seedlings they need shade definitely. In hot dry climates they would need shade as well, a humid moist micro climate.

They grow around here like weeds. Once a few are planted and fruiting they self seeding everywhere. As common as they are where they are planted they are not nearly planted enough IMO. Quick growing too. So if you want the tropical look and quickly this is the go to palm of choice. 

I'm not sure what selection we have around here as I collect seedlings and plant them where I want them but the leaflets are very wide and thin, the light shinning through that green is magic.

I couldn't agree more these are great palms. I have low humidity and they have grown into the sun and get a little fried. Seedlings pop up all the time

20210405_181110.jpg

20210405_181222.jpg

20210405_181121.jpg

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Missi

I moved my trio to a large nursery pot and placed it under a Sabal after Hurricane Irma tore down the canopy trees around it late summer 2017. I will be planting them back out soon :wub:

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