Jump to content
Jdiaz31089

Anyone into succulents?

Recommended Posts

Jdiaz31089

Hey just wondering if any of you are into succulents like I am. They seem to pair well with palms, in my opinion. The best part is that they are so easy to propagate that you can always have more to plant. I just divided and planted my dyckia sp. and manfreda today. The senecio and graptoveria were divided last fall and they've grown in really nicely. 

20170316_181537.thumb.jpg.3fdca5ed50281d

Share pictures of your succulents so we can all gawk at them :)

  • Upvote 11

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tracy

Yes, I too like to mix succulents in with my palms as well as Cycads.  Lots of color variation.  Succulents and cycads offer those of us in the southwest, where water is rarely abundant, a great way to ration water for our precious, and often thirsty palms.20170323-LI9A5906-2.thumb.jpg.8c49f9bef3

  • Upvote 8

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
tacobender

It has been said

IMG_20170324_144930.jpg

IMG_20170324_144824.jpg

  • Upvote 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
carver

These are some pics from last year, pardon the curbside weeds. image.thumb.jpeg.ff0a11394ebe28d0231cf67image.thumb.jpeg.ca6692b85adeae39c9e5b42image.thumb.jpeg.836447f437dd91e3474b56eimage.thumb.jpeg.ea3f9bb0b875c915cf1539eimage.thumb.jpeg.fbb48febfecb295c8ee3785image.thumb.jpeg.ee33a54c20f6b10bada4ad4

  • Upvote 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tracy
5 hours ago, tacobender said:

IMG_20170324_144718.jpg

I don't recognize this plant, although it reminds me of some Adenium I have (mine are still quite small).  Very nice blossom on it too.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jdiaz31089
On 3/23/2017, 9:44:10, Tracy said:

Yes, I too like to mix succulents in with my palms as well as Cycads.  Lots of color variation.  Succulents and cycads offer those of us in the southwest, where water is rarely abundant, a great way to ration water for our precious, and often thirsty palms.20170323-LI9A5906-2.thumb.jpg.8c49f9bef3

Very cool! What is the chunky one on the lower right?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jdiaz31089
12 hours ago, carver said:

These are some pics from last year, pardon the curbside weeds. image.thumb.jpeg.ff0a11394ebe28d0231cf67image.thumb.jpeg.ca6692b85adeae39c9e5b42image.thumb.jpeg.836447f437dd91e3474b56eimage.thumb.jpeg.ea3f9bb0b875c915cf1539eimage.thumb.jpeg.fbb48febfecb295c8ee3785image.thumb.jpeg.ee33a54c20f6b10bada4ad4

Very nice plants, i take it you're in a humid climate. 

And that agave in the fourth picture is very prolific and very nice in my opinion. I have several that all came from a single plant as divisions. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jdiaz31089
16 hours ago, tacobender said:

IMG_20170324_144718.jpg

 

11 hours ago, Tracy said:

I don't recognize this plant, although it reminds me of some Adenium I have (mine are still quite small).  Very nice blossom on it too.

My initial thought was that it's an adenium also. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
tacobender
46 minutes ago, Jdiaz31089 said:

 

My initial thought was that it's an adenium also. 

Yes, this one is a adenium obesium. it usually looks better, a lot of wind a month ago defoliated it.  Got a fat adenium  somalense just starting to trunk.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tracy
1 hour ago, Jdiaz31089 said:

What is the chunky one on the lower right?

Portulaca molokiniensis

Endemic: Molokini, Kaho’olawe

Description:  Short and stocky is the best description for these rare succulents. They have thick leaves that usually cluster towards the top of an even thicker stem. These plants usually branch up from the ground and look more like tiny cactus than Portulaca.  They also have a cluster of bright yellow flowers that sit in a cup of leaves which rises up from a long tube above the plant.  Here is a that plant from the crop... sorry my focus was further back in the frame, so this isn't crisp.  My biggest challenge with them is when they get too wet in the winter, which they don't seem to like.  I don't think it has been the cold, as they do better in the drier winters.  This clump in Leucadia is only about 1 year in the ground, but I have grown it for several years in Carlsbad, where I experienced that it preferred the drier winters. 

20170323-LI9A5906.jpg

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Al in Kona

I'm starting to get a collection of Echeverias. Some will be in containers and others will be planted in ground.  So far they seem to do well here in our upslope Kona, Hawaii climate.  They need perfect drainage and that we have.   

Echeverias in bowl,  1-15-17 (1).JPG

Echeverias in bowl,  1-15-17 (2).JPG

  • Upvote 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tracy
On 3/26/2017, 9:37:26, Al in Kona said:

I'm starting to get a collection of Echeverias.

They make nice companion plants in my climate too!  I don't recall which one this is but the blooms are a nice pink color!

20170622-104A6752.jpg

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tracy

More Escheverias in bloom, I like them as a compliment to the greens and blues.

20170702-104A6849.jpg

20170702-104A6822.jpg

20170702-104A6823.jpg

  • Upvote 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jdiaz31089
On 7/2/2017, 8:04:56, Tracy said:

More Escheverias in bloom, I like them as a compliment to the greens and blues.

20170702-104A6849.jpg

20170702-104A6822.jpg

20170702-104A6823.jpg

Those purples!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Missi

I looove succulents, especially unusual Aloe species! They grow wonderfully in my winters, but suffer through my summers. Good ol' Aloe vera, Aloe arborescens, Aloe nobilis, Aloe 'Blue Elf' grow great all-year-round for me. Aloe ferox grows okay year-round. I had ordered quite a few unusual Aloe species, but most got rot and perished. I got a really cool one, but it came with Aloe Cancer (:rant:) so I burned it. Also, I really wanted to grow Aloe marlothii, but it wants nothing to do with our summers. Sempervivums also do well for me, but...BORING! :indifferent:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jdiaz31089

Cool, I have grown marlothii and ferox - both are super easy plants in our dry climate. I am currently growing plicatilis, tongaensis and bainseii, although they're still small plants and will take a year or more to put on some size. 

Have you tried aloe thraskii? These grow in sand dunes, and since you're in Florida I'm assuming you have lots of sand in your soil. 

1 hour ago, Missi said:

I looove succulents, especially unusual Aloe species! They grow wonderfully in my winters, but suffer through my summers. Good ol' Aloe vera, Aloe arborescens, Aloe nobilis, Aloe 'Blue Elf' grow great all-year-round for me. Aloe ferox grows okay year-round. I had ordered quite a few unusual Aloe species, but most got rot and perished. I got a really cool one, but it came with Aloe Cancer (:rant:) so I burned it. Also, I really wanted to grow Aloe marlothii, but it wants nothing to do with our summers. Sempervivums also do well for me, but...BORING! :indifferent:

 

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Missi

Isn't Dyckia a bromeliad? You guys in the West and Southwest are so lucky! You can grow Puya! :yay:

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Missi
12 minutes ago, Jdiaz31089 said:

Cool, I have grown marlothii and ferox - both are super easy plants in our dry climate. I am currently growing plicatilis, tongaensis and bainseii, although they're still small plants and will take a year or more to put on some size. 

Have you tried aloe thraskii? These grow in sand dunes, and since you're in Florida I'm assuming you have lots of sand in your soil. 

 

I haven't tried A. thraskii, but I will now! Thanks for the suggestion!!

Yea, we don't have soil in South FL, we have sand...sand made out of seashells and limestone....can you say ALKALINE?!! :rant::crying: 

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jdiaz31089

You're absolutely right, they are bromeliads. In my mind, they always get lumped into the cacti/succulent category because of how much neglect they take. 

Speaking of puya, I just noticed this week that my p. berteroniana had been uprooted and apparently had been out of the ground for some time. I'm not sure how it could have happened, but it was all shriveled up right next to where i had planted it. Luckily the center was still alive and I replanted it and gave it some water. 

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Missi
5 minutes ago, Jdiaz31089 said:

You're absolutely right, they are bromeliads. In my mind, they always get lumped into the cacti/succulent category because of how much neglect they take. 

Speaking of puya, I just noticed this week that my p. berteroniana had been uprooted and apparently had been out of the ground for some time. I'm not sure how it could have happened, but it was all shriveled up right next to where i had planted it. Luckily the center was still alive and I replanted it and gave it some water. 

O NOES!! Glad you discovered it in time. Maybe a critter was rooting around and uprooted it.

 

Love the Echeverias above! I love them in general, but they waste away in my climate :unsure:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Dr Sha

I have some cacti (many species) , Aloe vera (four), Portulacaria afra, Crassula arborescens, (these two seem not to want to grow, they are almost the same size for 12 years now).  I would like some Lithops sp. but have not found them at the nurseries.

Edited by Dr Sha

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Dr Sha

cacti pictures

20170708_141044.jpg

20170708_141048.jpg

20170708_141053.jpg

20170708_140955.jpg

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Dr Sha

Aloe vera

20170708_140828.jpg

20170708_140925.jpg

Edited by Dr Sha
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Dr Sha

Crassula arborescens

20170708_140857.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Dr Sha

Portulacaria afra

20170708_140912.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5150cycad

Here are a few succulents I have around the house. 

1- aloe hercules

2- aloe ramosissima

3- aloe plicatilis 

Does anyone have any experience with stem propogation of any of these 3 plants? 

image.jpeg

image.jpeg

image.jpeg

  • Upvote 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5150cycad

A few more

1- Beaucarnea Stricta

2- Don't know 

image.jpeg

image.jpeg

  • Upvote 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5150cycad

Few more

1-don't know

2- kalanchoe

image.jpeg

image.jpeg

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tracy
On 7/6/2017, 8:33:26, Jdiaz31089 said:

Speaking of puya, I just noticed this week that my p. berteroniana had been uprooted and apparently had been out of the ground for some time. I'm not sure how it could have happened

Sounds like "critters".  I'm doing battle with skunks right now who are nightly digging for grubs around my plants.  I am a bit surprised that whatever it was, decided to dig around a Puya though, as they can be vicious.  Has your berteroniana ever bloomed?  I have P mirabilis blooming right now (its a frequent bloomer, as in annually once they are established).  Other than P mirabilis and P alpestris, the other species I'm growing have never bloomed with 6-7 years of growth (berteroniana, venusta and cuerulea).  Unfortunately, the one which blooms consistently is the least interesting of the bunch.  Puya alpestris is spectacular to say the least.... a real showstopper, as in everyone driving or walking by stops.  The last time one of my P alpestris bloomed was in May of 2013... so patience is required.5961befdc2204_20130508-IMG_4844Puyaalpes

  • Like 1
  • Upvote 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Silas_Sancona
20 hours ago, 5150cycad said:

Here are a few succulents I have around the house. 

1- aloe hercules

2- aloe ramosissima

3- aloe plicatilis 

Does anyone have any experience with stem propogation of any of these 3 plants? 

image.jpeg

image.jpeg

image.jpeg

Of the 3, have had success with a stem that broke off one of my A. "Hurcules". Can't say whether or not cuttings would work off A. plicatilis.  Had a nice multi headed specimen like the one pictured but lost it when we lived in Florida. Pretty sure that even if I could have taken cuttings, they also wouldn't have made it. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5150cycad
13 minutes ago, Silas_Sancona said:

Of the 3, have had success with a stem that broke off one of my A. "Hurcules". Can't say whether or not cuttings would work off A. plicatilis.  Had a nice multi headed specimen like the one pictured but lost it when we lived in Florida. Pretty sure that even if I could have taken cuttings, they also wouldn't have made it. 

That is good to know, thanks. Aloe plicatilis is very very finicky. They hate, or at least mine hate any water during our summer months as they are winter growers. I have lost one myself and it was most likely because I watered it during the summer with the rest of my plants. I learned to never water them at all and let the winter rain take care of it. Here is my largest one. What was your method with the Hercules? I was going to cut a branch, let it heal and then put it in pure pumice and see what happens. Any suggestions? Thanks 

image.jpg

  • Upvote 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Silas_Sancona

As far as plicatilis went, it was kept under our sun porch and bone dry, only being watered acouple times during the winter in Florida. Held up until the second summer, than rapidly went into decline. Definately hates excessive heat/ humidity.. even if kept somewhere cooler and dry. Was told by a couple different growers that they are also difficult to grow here in Arizona.. 

As for Hurcules, i'd had two branches break off last summer. Original plant is an over sized 5gal that had 4 branches ( thinking it was cut close to the ground at some point) One never rooted ( thinking it was in too much sun) The other id stuck into a pot with a Peltophorum seedling in more shade. Took awhile but I could tell it had started rooting/ growing by the beginning of spring. Realy didn't do anything special.. 

If i decide to cut the remaining branches off the original plant( looks kind of ugly.. the branches that broke never formed new growth)  they'll go into a soil mix high in pumice/ turface in shade until they root. Not sure if you have to allow them to heal over or not though. I think if the branches were bigger/ thicker, i might have let them dry at least a day or two. My biggest concern when they broke was getting them in soil. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tracy

Crassula ovata undulata makes a nice green backdrop for other colorful plants like a red aloe.

20170709-104A7014.jpg

  • Like 1
  • Upvote 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jdiaz31089
13 hours ago, Tracy said:

Crassula ovata undulata makes a nice green backdrop for other colorful plants like a red aloe.

20170709-104A7014.jpg

That's wonderful! I have that crassula variety, but they are such slow growers for me. Maybe I need to give them more sun. The A. dorothaea has such a great color. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tracy
25 minutes ago, Jdiaz31089 said:

crassula variety, but they are such slow growers for me. Maybe I need to give them more sun. The A. dorothaea has such a great color.

Yes, the crassula ovata undulata (aka "crassula blue waves"), is slow to get started than really takes off.  Like other jade it's a piece of cake to start from cuttings.  A bit more stretched in shade, and gets a slight yellow/red margin in heavy sun for me.  Aloe dorothaea has great color, but wants to grow prone, so often breaks off in pots or grows right out of them.  You have to control it by cutting off long runners periodically or it will go wild.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jdiaz31089
4 minutes ago, Tracy said:

Yes, the crassula ovata undulata (aka "crassula blue waves"), is slow to get started than really takes off.  Like other jade it's a piece of cake to start from cuttings.  A bit more stretched in shade, and gets a slight yellow/red margin in heavy sun for me.  Aloe dorothaea has great color, but wants to grow prone, so often breaks off in pots or grows right out of them.  You have to control it by cutting off long runners periodically or it will go wild.

I think I'll move mine to a spot with more sun. I've been growing them out for about a year now from 4-ich cuttings. I recently saw dorothaea at a nursery - maybe I'll go back and pick one up. I haven't had much luck with getting aloes to color up during the summer - in the winter they color up and stay plump, but in summer, it seems that if I want color, I need to cut back on watering and give them full sun - which usually makes them become scraggy and sad looking in our heat. Aloe vanbalenii is one I've had luck with - it can color up even with ample water. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Palm Tree Jim

Can any of you Southern CA palm folks recommend a place to buy some succulents/aloes/agaves?

Want to add some to my yard for more diversity.

Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jdiaz31089

I only know of places north of you - Dream Garden in Hollywood has lots of really cool, large plants as well as a collection of small plants to choose from. I saw a large, Aloe sabaea there last time I went. Rancho Soledad nursery I've heard it a must-stop place for succulents. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×