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Sanips

I've obtained a double seeding with this mule palm seed but one of them look like it's developing two different plumules. What do you think? :blink:

double_plumule.thumb.jpg.6faa4850bd95b08

 

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Kai

Yup looks like it. That must be 2 in a million!

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Sanips
31 minutes ago, Kai said:

Yup looks like it. That must be 2 in a million!

Lucky me! This seed has been triple joy then.

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Fusca

That's awesome!  I've seen photos of triples and even quadruples from growers of mules and butias.  I've never seen the inside of a mule palm seed, but I've cracked open butia seeds and they often contain 4 embryos.  Here is a link to a photo:  http://mulepalm.com/seedlings_6.html

I'm not sure if these can be easily separated or just allow to grow together.

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Pal Meir

Those are really identical twins (= gemelos homocigóticos = eineiige Zwillinge) and not the usual ones which originate from different seeds inside one fruit/nut. :o

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Sanips

It's weird as hell.

@Fusca I'm not going to separate them I want a clump which with time the different palms curve their stems due to the crown shyness effect (I think is called that way)

@Pal Meir Clearly I've sent my gemini vibes and I've a twin brother too :D

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ErikSJI

I see this a couple times a year. I have yet to see one survive past the seedling stage. I have pulled 4 quads in the last 10 years.

13669757_1147715938623262_6193799583684541076_n.jpg

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Pal Meir
43 minutes ago, ErikSJI said:

I see this a couple times a year. I have yet to see one survive past the seedling stage. I have pulled 4 quads in the last 10 years.

13669757_1147715938623262_6193799583684541076_n.jpg

Your seedlings are nothing unusual: There is only one seedling per seed because the fruit contains four separate seeds. But the twin in Sanips’ fruit grows out of only one seed.

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ErikSJI
21 hours ago, Pal Meir said:

Your seedlings are nothing unusual: There is only one seedling per seed because the fruit contains four separate seeds. But the twin in Sanips’ fruit grows out of only one seed.

I would have to disagree with you. There is only one seed. I have cracked many of these seeds open. Like a coconut, in this seed there are 3 functioning pores per seed. I can crack some open if you would like to see. You can also clearly see the embryo when cracked open.

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Pal Meir
23 minutes ago, ErikSJI said:

I would have to disagree with you. There is only one seed. I have cracked many of these seeds open. Like a coconut, in this seed there are 3 functioning pores per seed. I can crack some open if you would like to see. You can also clearly see the embryo when cracked open.

Oh, that’s interesting. I thought it would be like the multi-seeded nuts of Butia or Attalea, e.g. (Cf. my pic below.) — But I think there is still a difference: Your seedlings seem to sprout from different embryos whereas  Sanips’ twins seems to come out of the same one embryo, as it looks to me.

58b58b3247d74_ButiaSeeds72N11-0433.thumb

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Sanips

Slowly but steady

double_plumule2.thumb.jpg.b4b4bc522413da

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Sanips

A little update. The twins (Pollux and Castor) are putting distance between them :lol:

FullSizeRender.jpg

FullSizeRender.jpg

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