Jump to content
PalmTreeDude

Virginia Cold Snap, How Should I Protect My Trachy?

Recommended Posts

NorCalKing

That's where I felt the problem lies. From what Ive read, Virginia experienced 3 straight days well below freezing, down to single digits in some areas. I just can't see that soil not freezing. I mean we get occasional frosts' here on the West Coast too in zone 9b, but it is for maybe 6 hours, then we hit mid 50's - 60's the next day almost 100% of the time. Allowing palms to recover and the soil to never freeze. 

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
SEVA

I'm hoping the ground did not freeze, at least around the palm.  I added several inches (maybe 6") of mulch around the base of the queen.  Also, I placed bags of mulch on top of the mulch that I added.  It snowed a few inches before the extreme cold event, so I'm hoping it acted as an insulator.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Walt

Heavy mulch will help insulate the soil somewhat so as to hold in rising ground heat. When I lived in zone 7a I would mulch heavily over canna lily rhizomes and they wouldn't freeze, but sprout again in the spring.

I've read that the roots of a palm are the most vulnerable to freezing. Just because the trunk, meristem, and fronds can take some freezing cold (like a queen palm) the roots can't. The root system almost always sees warmer temperatures (being below the soil where it's warmer) than the above ground portion of the palms. That's why if you keep a potted palm (that can handle 25 degrees in when planted in the ground) outside during a cold spell , it might die from the roots being frozen when in a pot exposed to the same 25 degree temperature. The water in the potting soil will freeze and will also freeze the roots.

Below is a graphic I found online showing the potential depth the soil could freeze down to during the winter. But it depends on many factors. Some winters (a mild one with no consecutive days of freezing temperatures) there may be little soil freezing closer to the more southern margins of the below graphic.

NA_permafrost.jpg

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DCA_Palm_Fan
42 minutes ago, Walt said:

Heavy mulch will help insulate the soil somewhat so as to hold in rising ground heat. When I lived in zone 7a I would mulch heavily over canna lily rhizomes and they wouldn't freeze, but sprout again in the spring.

I've read that the roots of a palm are the most vulnerable to freezing. Just because the trunk, meristem, and fronds can take some freezing cold (like a queen palm) the roots can't. The root system almost always sees warmer temperatures (being below the soil where it's warmer) than the above ground portion of the palms. That's why if you keep a potted palm (that can handle 25 degrees in when planted in the ground) outside during a cold spell , it might die from the roots being frozen when in a pot exposed to the same 25 degree temperature. The water in the potting soil will freeze and will also freeze the roots.

Below is a graphic I found online showing the potential depth the soil could freeze down to during the winter. But it depends on many factors. Some winters (a mild one with no consecutive days of freezing temperatures) there may be little soil freezing closer to the more southern margins of the below graphic.

NA_permafrost.jpg

 

Interesting graphic.   That string of days with that cold of temps is fairly rare for the Va Beach area. True to form, it always jumps right back to 50s and 60's within 1-4 days.  I would highly doubt the ground ever freezes for more than 1-2" there.   Perhaps in that 2-3 day freeze which is unusual it got to 2-3".   SEVA must have been in a cold sink too, because I did not see to many single digit readings in the Va Beach area.    Out in rural Isle of Wight county I could almost believe the -2 though, in a cold sink, but that is exceedingly rare even for that far out. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jimhardy

It just depends how cold it gets

and if there is snow on the ground....

here,with bare ground and an Arctic outbreak

the soil is really penetrated by the cold(if

you have experienced temps below zero you

know what I mean)but with 3-4"+ of snow cover

it takes longer for the cold to get down in there.

 

I kinda laugh when I see the soil temps maps...

if I tried to push my sensor into the ground right now....

well,lets say the cement is as likely an option.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
NorCalKing

@SEVA please give us an update in the spring when you can make an assessment. That would be cool if that queen survived those temps.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
SEVA

I will try to give updates after I unwrap the palm this spring.  I should be able to give the first update in March (hopefully), depending on the weather.

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DCA_Palm_Fan
On 1/15/2017, 12:39:45, SEVA said:

I will try to give updates after I unwrap the palm this spring.  I should be able to give the first update in March (hopefully), depending on the weather.

Please do!   That would be nothing short of amazing if it survived.     Take photos of it  before its unwrapped and after.  :)

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Similar Content

    • Wizardmiami
      By Wizardmiami
      I am located southwest of Miami International Airport and low temperatures here track a few degrees lower than the airport.
      I use two indicators, the lowest winter temperature and the number of nights the temperature falls below 50 (my arbitrary indicator)
      I use 50 as a benchmark based on the point I will see leaf burn or stress on various palms or ornamental shrubs.
      The two graphs reflect minimums back to 1957 as does the "cold night" chart.
      Some notable points-
      1. Lows below 50 are less frequent (average now 9.58 nights a year- 1962-2022)
      2. The last time the airport went below 32 was Christmas 1989
      3. Average annual low 40.14 (1965-2022)
      4. Consider that the airport is much larger, more paved area and the urban area now extends around and way past the airport, so heat island impact seems likely.
      5. If you are starting out, here's some suggestions-  locate the nearest official weather reporting location, airport, local weather service office, and determine the typical difference in low temperatures compared to your location. Check on the forum for the experience of others in your area, ask local nurseryman, citrus growers, farmers, they are often a valuable source of frost/freeze information. Keep in mind the place you live may not have existed until recently, so long time locals may be the best sources. While the heat island created by the expanding developed areas can moderate the impact of winter cold, best to treat this factor conservatively. The last period of extreme cold was from 1977-1989, so there may not be any clear indication of what impact might be felt in your location.
      Miami winter seasonal minimum history.pdf winter nights below 50 Miami.pdf
    • knikfar
      By knikfar
      Hello all, 
           I planted this windmill palm in my yard about 5 months ago. It was looking fantastic up until about two weeks ago. Then the lower fronds started to droop. Then the centers of all of the fronds started to yellow a bit and now I'm noticing the individual blades are folded in half. I live in Raleigh, NC where these palms are prolific. It's planted in a mostly sunny area that doesn't drain very well so I mounded it up when I planted it. But because it doesn't drain well and the area stays fairly moist, I haven't given it any supplemental water and it's been hot and dry for weeks. Could this be drought stress? I thought it could also be a fungus so I sprayed it with copper fungicide, just in case. Anyone have thoughts to share? 



    • maskedmole
      By maskedmole
      I didn't really plan ahead and planted a windmill palm under a power line a few years ago. It is about a foot or 2 to the left of it. The top power line is about 15 ft high maybe and the line under it about 12 ft high. According the web it says it normally grows to only about 8-10ft in the cooler growing zones 6 and 7. I am in Tennessee, and some sites list my area as zone 6b, other sites say I am in zone 7a. Most of our winters are above zero.
      But it's absolute max height is like 30 or 40ft if it is in really ideal conditions. It says it commonly reaches 10-20ft in landscape uses, however. It is in I would say partial or full shade. I know it's probably really unlikely to get past 10ft. Has it ever gone past 10ft in a cooler zone, or should I just not take any chances and move it? I know it probably wouldn't like to be dug up and also it has been established for so long and handles winters much better than it's first winter in which it defoliated but every winter after that it has kept it's lush green leaves.
      It seems really happy their and puts out several leaves a year. It seems to love our abundant rains. It, however, doesn't seem to grow very fast trunk wise. Maybe it grew about an inch or two of trunk over 3 years and 10 or so leaves.
    • PalmTreeDude
      By PalmTreeDude
      Hello everyone, I was looking at an app called iNaturalist, which is an app that lets you post and look at observations of plants and animals around the world, and I typed in Cocos nucifera and found this post in northern Morocco by the Mediterranean Sea. Does anyone know any information about this? I thought that it would be too cool in the winter for them there. 


    • PalmTreeDude
      By PalmTreeDude
      Is this normal? I noticed the oldest frond on my new Washingtonia robusta that I got from Lowes (really cheap) was dying in a weird way, it is almost like the way some diseases start in palms. But the thing is it was like this for a few weeks now, I think I am just being paranoid. Does this look normal? Maybe it was just damaged so it is dying like this? I just am hoping this doesn’t have some disease. 




×
×
  • Create New...