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TikiRick

Ganoderma hell

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NOT A TA
On 3/13/2019 at 1:54 PM, Merlyn2220 said:

The conk on the queen is on the North side, maybe a little bit NW.  I didn't see conks on the other queens or other palms in the area, not even on the dead one.  But some were obscured by pine shrubs so I'd have to stomp around in their beds to see them.   

The hotel was built around 2010, and they did recently repave the parking lot and entryway, I'm not sure if it was before or after the queens started getting sick.  Most of them looked fine until last spring.

I forgot that I took a picture of the dead queen's base, it's below.  The area around the lava rock is split and rotted, and there are several "weeping" areas on the trunk, mostly in the bottom 3-6 feet.  It's been dead for months, but there's no sign that there was ever a conk on this palm.

20190312_174454 cropped.jpg

In my research for a fungus with basidiocarp that looks more like the one in Ricks case at the start of this this thread I came across articles describing Palms being affected by the fungus Thielaviopsis paradoxa  also known as Palm trunk-rot which may be the cause of death of the first Queen at the hotel. Your mention of the weeping areas on the lower trunk and previous mention of the hotel removing dead Palms before crowns fall made me think to look up symptoms. Found this paper https://fshs.org/proceedings-o/2004-vol-117/324-325.pdf

The symptoms described for Thielaviopsis seem consistent with your observations on the dead Queen including the lack of a conk. Haven't found any documentation of coinciding cases of Ganoderma and Thielaviopsis but it may be possible that the different types of fungus can survive on the same host. So lets say the currently declining Queen with the Ganoderma conk started suffering from Thielaviopsis it may have been more susceptible to Ganoderma,  yet because the Ganoderma conk is obvious we presume that's whats killing the Palm.

Edited by NOT A TA

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Merlyn2220
34 minutes ago, NOT A TA said:

In my research for a fungus with basidiocarp that looks more like the one in Ricks case at the start of this this thread I came across articles describing Palms being affected by the fungus Thielaviopsis paradoxa  also known as Palm trunk-rot which may be the cause of death of the first Queen at the hotel. Your mention of the weeping areas on the lower trunk and previous mention of the hotel removing dead Palms before crowns fall made me think to look up symptoms. Found this paper https://fshs.org/proceedings-o/2004-vol-117/324-325.pdf

The symptoms described for Thielaviopsis seem consistent with your observations on the dead Queen including the lack of a conk. Haven't found any documentation of coinciding cases of Ganoderma and Thielaviopsis but it may be possible that the different types of fungus can survive on the same host. So lets say the currently declining Queen with the Ganoderma conk started suffering from Thielaviopsis it may have been more susceptible to Ganoderma,  yet because the Ganoderma conk is obvious we presume that's whats killing the Palm.

You may be correct on this one, I am not sure if others have the "bleeding trunk" symptoms of Thielaviopsis.  The one in the photo with the badly bleeding trunk has been dead since at least the May 2018 Google streetview image, so it's possible that the "bleeding" is an opportunistic fungus feeding on dead tissue.   The one with the conk was basically dead in May 2018, with only 1 half-alive frond and 4 other dead or dying ones.  The crown on both of them leaned over and fell off.  I'll have to roll past again to see if others have bleed marks on the trunks.

From the link, Thiophanate-methyl appears to be pretty effective on coconut seedlings and mature trees.  I was looking at a few articles online, and it looks like they tested with Dazomet with 83% success in infected oil palm stumps.  That might be another one to try, though I don't know if has any systemic action.

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NOT A TA

I was at the Post Office yesterday so based on the Thielaviopsis symptoms info I looked at what I'd previously assumed were just damage on Palm C (one with conks) and found the weeping appearance similar to the hotel specimen. So perhaps the Palms are dying of Thielaviopsis when in a weakened state (or already having dead tissue) the Ganoderma jumps in to join the party. Here's pics of Palm C trunk, no weeping symptoms noted on Palms D-E at this time. Someone did knock the new conk on Palm C off so that was disappointing.

20190318_153810_zpsr9vptg1o.jpg

20190318_153816_zpsl0807kp5.jpg

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NOT A TA
23 hours ago, Merlyn2220 said:

From the link, Thiophanate-methyl appears to be pretty effective on coconut seedlings and mature trees.  I was looking at a few articles online, and it looks like they tested with Dazomet with 83% success in infected oil palm stumps.  That might be another one to try, though I don't know if has any systemic action.

In the Coconut seedling tests done by the Florida Tropical Research center, soaking the roots with Thiophanate-methyl seemed to have worked well as a preventive. The testing of previously infected mature Cocos info is unclear whether the solution applied "cured" the palm or just killed the disease at the weeping lesions painted with the slurry. I suspect the latter based on the way results were written. No mention of bore testing or laboratory results. So does "evaluated" mean they just looked at the lesions?

"In the second trial, mature coconut palms with weeping trunk lesions were treated with either Benlate or Cleary’s3336. The fungicides were made into a slurry and painted on the lesions monthly for one year. They were evaluated after six and 12 months and found to be free of fungus."

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Merlyn2220

Saturday I went on a bike ride and stopped at the dead and dying Queens and European fan palms and they finally cut down and removed the two dead Queens.  I took pictures of the trunks, and the dying Chamaerops Humilis with an apparently healthy one in the middle of two suffering ones.  These are about 15 yards North of the Queen trunks.  I marked North and the area of the conk on one photo for reference, but I don't recall which direction was North on the other picture.  I think North is to the bottom of that photo, but there was no visible conk on that trunk so it might not be important.

I'll check back in a bit and see if either (or both) have started bleeding white gunk or developed any new visible fungi. 

20190410_175219 cropped.jpg

20190410_175310 cropped.jpg

20190410_175257 cropped.jpg

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