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Mr.SamuraiSword

Palms north of Virginia.

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Mr.SamuraiSword

Maryland

2384337-a-few-palm-trees-on-the-beach-in

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a Hardier palmetto007-8.thumb.jpg.fdc2e26fa6ac1b1971430632

and an even hardier Trachy

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even more palmettos and Fan Palms in centreville MD.  kinda like VA beach

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Next is Delaware

A Palmetto near the border of MD 

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and some trachys

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New jersey

Queens, Cocos and Washingtonias on Long Branch beachP8012082.thumb.jpg.7af9be5e803615b851bcd

and some Sabals and more (small) Washingtonias

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and of course some trachys.

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Next is New york

cocos from IWPT

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and another trachya77815dfb0bcb81b2cbf73ad42e2a485.jpg.f04

Next is CT

Some queens in Waterford

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and some Trachys in Norwalk

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Next is Rhode island queens. No hardier palms here 

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Last, Mass

 

Some Bismarka Palms 

tlumacki_miami-reverebeach_metro237copy.

and another trachy 

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Post your pics please!

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Edited by Mr.SamuraiSword
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PalmTreeDude

The only palms that are not annuals up there are Sabal palmetto (could die in a colder winter), Windmill Palms, Needle Palms, and Sabal minor. The rest will not have a chance at all surviving the winter. But I think it is cool how they do that, but, at the same time a waste of money! Thank you for sharing.

Edited by PalmTreeDude
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Zeeth
31 minutes ago, Mr.SamuraiSword said:

3c20ea.jpg.d1b0cc128fed9fb51f6b029319673

Are you sure this one was taken in MD? 

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NorCalKing

This post is bordering on comical. But nice pics!

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smithgn
1 hour ago, Zeeth said:

Are you sure this one was taken in MD? 

I was wondering the same thing too after seeing the serenoa repens, but it is situated in a nice microclimate with the water just a few feet away. Or wait, is that water or just a grassy area? My eyes (or computer screen) are failing me lol

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Mr.SamuraiSword
8 hours ago, Zeeth said:

Are you sure this one was taken in MD? 

In Centreville MD this was taken.  Crazy right?

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Mr.SamuraiSword
8 hours ago, NorCalKing said:

This post is bordering on comical. But nice pics!

I can assure you those queens, and cocos and even the washies wont survive the winter.  But the usually truck them up in may, and truck them back to florida in october.  all over maryland and NJ they do this.  Ive even seen this in CT with the queens

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Mr.SamuraiSword
9 hours ago, PalmTreeDude said:

The only palms that are not annuals up there are Sabal palmetto (could die in a colder winter), Windmill Palms, Needle Palms, and Sabal minor. The rest will not have a chance at all surviving the winter. But I think it is cool how they do that, but, at the same time a waste of money! Thank you for sharing.

Its a shame they use bismarkas thoigh.  those arent even beach palms nor are they hardy!  At least Palmettos would look more beachy and would be cheaper to replace

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Zeeth
46 minutes ago, Mr.SamuraiSword said:

In Centreville MD this was taken.  Crazy right?

I don't believe it. There's Roystonea regia, a large clump of Acoelorrhaphe and bromeliads (Neoregelia maybe?) in the background, the Sabal palmetto look relatively established. No one's trucking up large clumps of Acoelorrhaphe up to MD to have it die a few months later. This is somewhere in Florida. 

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Las Palmas Norte

You're all wrong. I believe these pics where taken in southern Alaska. ;)

Cheers, Barrie. 

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PalmTreeDude
On 9/12/2016, 12:28:26, Las Palmas Norte said:

You're all wrong. I believe these pics where taken in southern Alaska. ;)

Cheers, Barrie. 

Hey! Some of the western islands of Alaska are zone 8b... But I bet they get killed with wind.

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DCA_Palm_Fan
On September 11, 2016 at 9:38:00 PM, Zeeth said:

Are you sure this one was taken in MD? 

That photo is definitely not anywhere  in Maryland.    Those are mature palms, and as has been pointed out there ate a bunch of mature Roystonea regia  palms along that street. There are so many other types of subtropical plants in that photo that there just is no way that is anywhere north of Florida.   Sorry.    The other Maryland pics I believe. The palms are small and used as annuals in touristy places like OC.   I'm from DC and have lived in MD. I grew up in Bowie.   I now live in northern VA for 17 years.  Some restaurants here truck in large queens and even cocos, but they let them just die every year.   Shame.  

image.jpeg

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Palmsbro
On 9/11/2016, 9:38:00, Zeeth said:

Are you sure this one was taken in MD? 

3c20ea.jpg.d1b0cc128fed9fb51f6b029319673

  When I looked at the source ("Kelley MacDonald C 2010"), I noticed some links to Marco Island, FL, which is probably where this photo was actually taken. I will not dispute the other photos though.

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Mr.SamuraiSword
On 4/14/2018, 8:33:08, Palmsbro said:

3c20ea.jpg.d1b0cc128fed9fb51f6b029319673

  When I looked at the source ("Kelley MacDonald C 2010"), I noticed some links to Marco Island, FL, which is probably where this photo was actually taken. I will not dispute the other photos though.

I origionally found these on daves garden which said they were in centreville maryland.  Hilarious that I didnt do any research.  Of course at that time I thought those windmills in Norwalk were unprotected and that i could plant my windmill unprotected in CT.  They died a few years back when a new owner didnt protect them.  Ive come a long way in this hobby.

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palmsOrl
On 9/11/2016, 9:38:00, Zeeth said:

Are you sure this one was taken in MD? 

I was thinking the same thing.  Those look too good.  Are those large Roystonea in the distance?

Reading the whole thread answered my question!

Edited by palmsOrl

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Palmlover.

Are you sure about cocos?

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DCA_Palm_Fan
23 hours ago, Palmlover. said:

Are you sure about cocos?

Anything north of MD that is not a needle palm, sabal minor, or trachycarpus, are all planted as annuals.  They will simply not survive.  Even in Virginia Beach, VA, the only reliable palms there are the 3 I just mentioned, plus Sabal Palmetto (away from immediate coast) and Butia Capitata.     Anything else are planted as annuals and either left to die in winter, or are rented and housed in large greenhouses in winter. 

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Mr.SamuraiSword

Some Chamerops have done well in the VB area too. 

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climate change virginia
On 9/15/2016 at 10:09 PM, DCA_Palm_Fan said:

Some restaurants here truck in large queens and even cocos, but they let them just die every year.   Shame.  

I know right I hate that get a hardy palm thats what I tell them

Edited by climate change virginia

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