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PalmTreeDude

"Water Palms" (Question)

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PalmTreeDude

I have seen pictures of palms fully growing out of water and water beds, I am wondering, what are some of these palms? I know Sabal minor can grow out of water beds, but what are the others? Or at least some. Does a Majesty Palm have the ability to grow in a water bed? I do know they like their water! Anyway, if anyone has any information on this topic, please tell me!

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Zeeth
7 minutes ago, PalmTreeDude said:

Does a Majesty Palm have the ability to grow in a water bed?

Yes.

ravenea%20rivular%20on%20river%20madagas

 

Others of note are Ravanea musicalis:

Ravenea_musicalis08.jpg

 

Nypa fruticans:

DSC_2929.jpg

 

Roystonea regia:

IMG_5156.thumb.JPG.639cf84ca24642d532a58

 

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PalmTreeDude
25 minutes ago, Zeeth said:

Yes.

ravenea%20rivular%20on%20river%20madagas

 

Others of note are Ravanea musicalis:

Ravenea_musicalis08.jpg

 

Nypa fruticans:

DSC_2929.jpg

 

Roystonea regia:

IMG_5156.thumb.JPG.639cf84ca24642d532a58

 

Awesome images! Thank you for sharing. I would not expect a royal to be directly in the water, but beside it instead, or on the shore. Interesting! 

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Neil C

Lipstick, Everglades, King, Coconut.

 

Regards Neil

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Pal Meir

Caryota mitis, Phoenix paludosa, etc.

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Tropicgardener

Archontophoenix, Metroxylon, Arenga australasica, Arenga engleri,  Arenga microcarpa, Chamaedorea cataractarum, Acoelorrhaphe, Ptychosperma macarthurii, Salacca zalacca, Licuala ramsayi,, Livistona australis, livistona decora, Elaeis guineensis ........... I have all of these palms growing in very boggy, sometimes flooded areas.

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Cocoa Beach Jason

I have seen sabal palmetto grow in this position in both fresh and salt water. 

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realarch

You can add Mauritia flexuosa, Mauritiella armata, and Hydriastele rheophytica.

Tim

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Pal Meir

… and other palms of the Amazonas region like Mauritiella aculeataEuterpe oleracea, E longibracteata, E precatoria, Geonoma bronginiartii, G laxiflora, G maxima var spixiana, Oenocarpus bataua, Phytelephas macrocarpa, many Bactris spp., etc., the list isn’t complete at all.

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Tyrone

Beccariophoenix alfredii seems to be OK in water too.

IMG_1975.jpg

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Pedro 65

Raphia's...............     Pete 

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doranakandawatta
7 hours ago, realarch said:

You can add Mauritia flexuosa, Mauritiella armata, and Hydriastele rheophytica.

Tim

…. and Oncosperma tigillarium?

 

how about Dypsis paludosa , Dypsis aquatilis or Dypsis rivularis?

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Alicehunter2000

Those pics are awesome. ...more pics!

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PalmTreeDude
1 hour ago, Alicehunter2000 said:

Those pics are awesome. ...more pics!

Agreed! I want more pictures of palms in water as well!

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realarch

So, I thought I'd throw in some more photos to add to this thread. 

Some Mauritia flexuosa in habitat. I do believe the small ones are Mauritia as well. Incredibly majestic and abundant palms in this part of the Amazon.

Tim

IMG_2460.jpg

IMG_5515.jpg

IMG_5508.jpg

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realarch

Desmoncus, a climbing palm. Could be D. mitis or D. polyacanthos. Mean stuff, trying to grab onto one would rip your fingers to shreds. 

Parts were totally submerged. This photo was taken in Ecuador. 

Tim

IMG_2462.jpg

IMG_2464.jpg

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realarch

Another water lover, Manicaria saccifera. Monster palms lining the waterways, Costa Rica.

Tim

IMG_7640.jpg

IMG_7654.jpg

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Eric in Orlando

Here are some Roystonea regia growing in water at Dickinson State Park west of Jupiter, FL. This is along the Loxahatchee River that eventually flows into the ocean. This area is where the fresh water starts to mix with saltier water. It is where mangroves and bald cypress intermix.

 

100_1982.jpg

 

100_1977.jpg

 

100_1981.jpg

 

 

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Eric in Orlando

Here is a Washingtonia filifera at the University of Arizona campus. It is growing into a pond.

 

 

100_6332.jpg

 

100_6331.jpg

 

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Eric in Orlando

These Livistona chinensis are often in standing water during periods of high rainfall. They are growing along Howell Creek at Mead Gardens in Winter Park, FL. The whole area is black, wet, mucky soil year round. It often floods and they can be in 1-2 feet of water for weeks at a time. Livistona chinensis has naturalized here and there are thousands of them growing there.

 

100_2048.jpg

 

100_2029.jpg

 

100_2041.jpg

 

 

Same with this Phoenix canariensis hybrid;

 

100_2012.jpg

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Eric in Orlando

Here is a few at Leu Gardens in Orlando, FL;

 

Licuala spinosa, the short palm in front is Dypsis rivularis;

 

2016-09-1220014_zps4fabehvd.jpg

 

2016-09-12%20015_zps7xidwcjj.jpg

 

 

 

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Eric in Orlando

Chelyocarpus chuco

 

2016-09-12%20017_zpsrfapvg4a.jpg

 

 

Chamaedorea cataractarum

 

2016-09-12%20016_zpshnfwfd2r.jpg

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Kris

Dear Eric,

Beautiful visuals..

Thanks and Love,

Kris.

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PalmTreeDude

All of these images are wonderful! Thank you for sharing and giving me more information about palms in water!

Edited by PalmTreeDude

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Mr. Coconut Palm

Sorry, I don't have any photos of them, but I have seen Washingtonia robustas growing in the resacas (oxbow lakes, which are the old river channels of the Rio Grande River).  I never would have thought that a desert palm like the robustas could grow in water all the time.

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PalmTreeDude
17 hours ago, Mr. Coconut Palm said:

Sorry, I don't have any photos of them, but I have seen Washingtonia robustas growing in the resacas (oxbow lakes, which are the old river channels of the Rio Grande River).  I never would have thought that a desert palm like the robustas could grow in water all the time.

Washintonia in water is actually a natural thing for them, well, I know Washingtonia Filifera grow with their trunks about half way in water in dessert oasis. I think only the Robusta would be able to grow fully in water, very cool! Thank you for mentioning this!

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Tyrone
On 12 September 2016 8:39:14 PM, Eric in Orlando said:

These Livistona chinensis are often in standing water during periods of high rainfall. They are growing along Howell Creek at Mead Gardens in Winter Park, FL. The whole area is black, wet, mucky soil year round. It often floods and they can be in 1-2 feet of water for weeks at a time. Livistona chinensis has naturalized here and there are thousands of them growing there.

 

100_2048.jpg

 

100_2029.jpg

 

100_2041.jpg

 

 

Same with this Phoenix canariensis hybrid;

 

100_2012.jpg

I've just planted some chinensis around a similar type water course as in your first pic. I'm trying to get the same sort of look in one area of the garden. Will trim the old fronds though. At the moment the young plants sit in water periodically. One hasn't made it, but I think the others will.

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