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Laaz

A hardy Charleston garden...

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Laaz

Visited the good Doctor's garden today down in the historic section of Charleston. I'm really amazed at some of the things he is growing. He said he has never protected anything. Fruiting queen palm, two nice Acrocomia totai (Haven't produced fruit yet) Rhapis Excelsa, multiple Butia hybrid palms he acquired from the late Merrill Wilcox... A two story seed grown avocado...

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Laaz

Acrocomia totai

 

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Laaz

Another Totai...

 

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Laaz

Brahea armata

 

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Laaz

Butia x parajubaea

 

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Laaz

Two story seedling avocado.

 

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Laaz

Queen & Totai hanging over the back wall.

 

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TexasColdHardyPalms

Thats the largest butia x pj hybrid I've seen. However it doesnt look as pretty as i had hoped. Is that one grown in considerable shade? 

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Ben in Norcal
9 minutes ago, TexasColdHardyPalms said:

Thats the largest butia x pj hybrid I've seen. However it doesnt look as pretty as i had hoped. Is that one grown in considerable shade? 

Yes, that one looks very meagre.  Check out some of the threads on BxP - bigger ones around here, in Dick Douglas' garden, and just down the street from me in one of Patric's local plantings.  Dick's from way back in 2010 below.

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RedRabbit

Thanks for all the pictures! Charleston has some great gardens, it is easily one of my favorite cities. I'm surprised to see queens up there.

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Laaz

Yes the BxP is in heavy shade. Some of the other large feather palms are BxJ from Merrill Wilcox.

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Laaz
7 hours ago, RedRabbit said:

Thanks for all the pictures! Charleston has some great gardens, it is easily one of my favorite cities. I'm surprised to see queens up there.

Yeah he has two queens & two Totai's that are doing great.

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PalmTreeDude

Is it sad if I would prefer a Mule Palm over a Queen Palm? I love those things!

Edited by PalmTreeDude

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NorCalKing
4 hours ago, PalmTreeDude said:

Is it sad if I would prefer a Mule Palm over a Queen Palm? I love those things!

I think you'd change your mind living on the wet coast. Queens are just everywhere, and scream home depot lol

Hence, why I planted Achy's/King's

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Fusca

Great photos - thanks for posting.  Encouraging to hear that Acrocomia totai has done well in 9a.  I was considering planting a Acrocomia aculeata that I grew from seed in my 9a garden against southern wall of house next spring.  Does anyone else think it will do OK?  I think it's worth a try based on what I've read about it here on PT.  It's started trunking with spines with 3 adult leaves so far (growing pretty fast).

Jon

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Alicehunter2000

Acrocomia totai......doing well in 9a....do the spines fall off and cause the ground to be littered with needles? ..... they look so much better than queens IMO. Nice garden with some cool unusual cold hardy plants.....gotta love the avocado in this zone too.

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Zifool

Amazing garden for sure :wub: acrocomia are to rare cultivated palms

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smithgn
On ‎9‎/‎9‎/‎2016‎ ‎3‎:‎17‎:‎37‎, Fusca said:

Great photos - thanks for posting.  Encouraging to hear that Acrocomia totai has done well in 9a.  I was considering planting a Acrocomia aculeata that I grew from seed in my 9a garden against southern wall of house next spring.  Does anyone else think it will do OK?  I think it's worth a try based on what I've read about it here on PT.  It's started trunking with spines with 3 adult leaves so far (growing pretty fast).

Jon

I don't know much about Aculeata, but if similar in cold hardiness to Totai, then it should do fine in your 9A, albeit with a little damage from time to time. There's an Acrocomia Totai at Bamboo Gardens just outside of Savannah and they're a cold 9A, if not an 8B, and it has survived some of the worst these last several winters threw at it. I'd give it a try. I'm in an 8A and I contemplated giving it a go :P But of course, they're so hard to find.

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smithgn

And by the way Laaz, what kind of Avocado tree is that? It must be some sort of Mexican hybrid? I thought that us South Carolinians could only dream of growing Avocados but I'm glad I'm wrong! Thanks for the pics, awesome as always.

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Laaz

I believe he said the avocado was a Mexican variety, but wasn't sure. He said it blooms every year, but he doesn't have a pollinizer.

 

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Laaz

Just a heads up, but there are now a good selection of cold hardy avocado's that are said to be good to 15F...

 

1. Joey 
2. Wilma 
3. Brazos Belle 
4. Poncho 
5. Lila 
6. Fantastic
Edited by Laaz
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DoomsDave

Todd!

Great pictures (crunch! Oooh, better, my neck)!

Bet some of the coccoid hybrids would do better with more sun. (You can experiment in your garden, of course!)

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Laaz

Thanks Dave. He has quite a bit of overhead canopy. I have a bunch of mules in my yard but it will take a couple years to start getting decent size to them.

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Las Palmas Norte

Agreed ... great photos. As good as they are it's always nicer to walk thru a garden like that. You where that lucky.

Cheers, Barrie.

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Laaz

Going back next week to harvest the seeds... & bring him a few things he doesn't have.

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DoomsDave
5 hours ago, Laaz said:

Thanks Dave. He has quite a bit of overhead canopy. I have a bunch of mules in my yard but it will take a couple years to start getting decent size to them.

Be sure they have room, or you may get nostalgic for back when they were little, and you weren't bumping into them at every turn.

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Laaz

Lol! My yard is a jungle, They'll do great where I have them.

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DoomsDave
37 minutes ago, Laaz said:

Lol! My yard is a jungle, They'll do great where I have them.

Hope it's a roomy jungle. The trunks on mine are about 2 feet across, and they're robust.

Not like Jubes, but still robust.

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bubba

Charleston is one great place. Never would believe Avocado and Queens although tremendous progress developing cold hardy varieties ( especially the Alligator Pears). Next thing you know, you will be growing Banyans. Near the Battery? Thank you for the great pictures.

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smithgn
On ‎9‎/‎12‎/‎2016‎ ‎9‎:‎59‎:‎23‎, bubba said:

Charleston is one great place. Never would believe Avocado and Queens although tremendous progress developing cold hardy varieties ( especially the Alligator Pears). Next thing you know, you will be growing Banyans. Near the Battery? Thank you for the great pictures.

Charleston is incredible in what you can grow. Surrounded by water on three sides, just far enough south and with a really strong UHI, you can grow some solid zone 9 palms there. The city and its residents understandably only stick to Palmettos, but it would be cool to see some different zone 9 palms around. There are about a dozen or so Canary Island Date palms I've spotted that look great but nothing more exotic than that.... That is, until I've seen this post!

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Laaz

Come on bubba, you know we have a commercial coconut plantation on the Battery...

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Laaz

Stopped by the Doc's house today & harvested a bunch of the queen seeds. Here's one of his mule palms. I believe he said he got it from Merrill years ago. This thing is massive. Too bad the seed are not viable... It stands over 30 ft tall.

 

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Explorer

Well Charleston is at 32 degrees latitude north, so the same latitude as North Africa. And close to the coast with mild winters and long hot summers. Except the odd coldsnap in winter it should be a very good climate for lots of palm species as long they can take a little bit of frost now and then in winter.

 

They get also some native palms in that area like Sabal!

 

Alexander

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southpacific73

More experimentation needed with that kind of a climate with different varieties but have to say an awesome looking garden.

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