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Sabal Steve

Growing Massive Fan Palms in Temperate Mediterranean Climates

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Sabal Steve

I haven't been able to find much on growing the more massive fan palms (mostly Borassus and Corypha) in Mediterranean climates.  Many know of the Corypha in Bird Rock, San Diego, but does anyone know of other attempts.  There's a big Borassus at the Zoo, and it's thriving.  Here's some updated pics.  I germinated a few C. utan in the Spring, and they are already pushing their fourth leaf.  Faster than all of my other seedlings.  Soon, I'll probably plant one.

 

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Small palm

Nice looking palm there. I'm interested in this thread too because I live in a Mediterranean climate and I love big fan palms. 

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Sabal Steve

Here's a few pics of a C. umbraculiferia that was growing in costal San Diego.  It's obviously been there for a while, but doesn't look all that great.  Anyone have any idea on the cause of the "crispy" look?   

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Kris

Dear Steve,

Nice visuals..and that talipot palms feet is full of rocks that has to be removed and during summers it must be watered every alternate days.Since these palms don't like dry hot climate.Since these belong to hot wet tropical zones having high coastal humidity.

Inspite of all these that palm does look healthy and well grown.Those stones in its feet must go !

Love,

Kris.

 

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Danilopez89
59 minutes ago, Kris said:

Dear Steve,

Nice visuals..and that talipot palms feet is full of rocks that has to be removed and during summers it must be watered every alternate days.Since these palms don't like dry hot climate.Since these belong to hot wet tropical zones having high coastal humidity.

Inspite of all these that palm does look healthy and well grown.Those stones in its feet must go !

Love,

Kris.

 

I would imagine that the rocks help the palm by providing the root zone with some extra heat on the sunny days out by the cool SD coast. 

Also rocks are very good at retaining moisture in the soil under them. I like my rocks better than mulch ^_^

 

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rprimbs

That Borassus looks pretty nice!  I think the Corypha's are too darn slow here.  I wanna grow one of those double coconuts...

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