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PalmatierMeg

Copernicia macroglossa: this is how you keep it

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PalmatierMeg

A while back Cocoa Beach Jason posted photos of a butchered C. macroglossa that made me cringe - felony palm abuse. I have a much smaller version (no trunk, I think) planted in my Caribbean front garden. I was given it by a PTer in Punta Gorda back in 2008. From a 1g to this. Not a rocket. It has some nutritional issues but we are in the middle of summer fertilizer blackout and I've had more critical issues to face lately. I'll feed it in the fall. BTW, in the first photo, the palm behind it is my largest Sabal Lisa. Jason, I really hope you can rescue your neighbor's C.m. from its idiot owner.

Copernicia macroglossa

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Cocoa Beach Jason

Meg it looks great! 

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Mandrew968

Meg, you got some potassium issues like you don't usually see in this species... sandy soil? I would hit it with as much ferts as you can and also trim up all the shade around it, or it will be glacially slow!

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Rusty on Pine Is.
2 hours ago, Mandrew968 said:

Meg, you got some potassium issues like you don't usually see in this species... sandy soil? I would hit it with as much ferts as you can and also trim up all the shade around it, or it will be glacially slow!

I have the same deficiency in my Copernicias, but the addition of potassium is rarely successful, at least past the immediate short term.  Even when using the Sol-po-mag formulation,  anything less than monthly applications show little or no results.

And you are correct, Andrew, it’s all sand.  My soil has a very low CEC (cation exchange capacity), and as such there is very little in the way of  mineral retention in the soil…..the negative  electrical charge to bind the mineral and soil particles together is so low that most just leaches away.

I have tried the addition of humic acid to add organic material (which should raise the CEC), but it is a wasted effort without some higher carbon content for IT to bind too.

I am now trying vertimulching…auguring holes into the soil profile and adding organic material, either compost or charcoal, even old orchid potting media……anything to raise the CEC and stop the leaching of K and Mg.

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Mandrew968
3 hours ago, Rusty on Pine Is. said:

I have the same deficiency in my Copernicias, but the addition of potassium is rarely successful, at least past the immediate short term.  Even when using the Sol-po-mag formulation,  anything less than monthly applications show little or no results.

 

And you are correct, Andrew, it’s all sand.  My soil has a very low CEC (cation exchange capacity), and as such there is very little in the way of  mineral retention in the soil…..the negative  electrical charge to bind the mineral and soil particles together is so low that most just leaches away.

 

I have tried the addition of humic acid to add organic material (which should raise the CEC), but it is a wasted effort without some higher carbon content for IT to bind too.

 

I am now trying vertimulching…auguring holes into the soil profile and adding organic material, either compost or charcoal, even old orchid potting media……anything to raise the CEC and stop the leaching of K and Mg.

 

I was gonna say, save your burn pile--the ash in that is great. Also, Tyrone mentioned a while back that he removes vertically and adds peat that has been soaked in ironite or a chelated iron. That might be a good thing for you! We get magneseum deficiency in my soil, but the rock hold nutrients, no doubt, better than sand...

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Rusty on Pine Is.
1 minute ago, Mandrew968 said:

I was gonna say, save your burn pile--the ash in that is great. Also, Tyrone mentioned a while back that he removes vertically and adds peat that has been soaked in ironite or a chelated iron. That might be a good thing for you! We get magneseum deficiency in my soil, but the rock hold nutrients, no doubt, better than sand...

Thanks for the heads up on the ash and the peat and iron, Andrew........ going to try on the next round of holes!

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