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Pedro 65

Cyphosperma TANGA

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Pedro 65

This palm germinated for Arden in Feb 2011, so its 5 n half yrs since germination, and thats pretty much its size 5ft 5", so V fast growers in the right conditions they seem to love the Sub tropical climate here, the pic of me holding it is in May 2012. I try and replicate their environment the best I can, thats why you see the mossy bush rocks.  "Please" show yours , and thanks Arden for selling me 2 a few yrs ago :greenthumb:    Pete

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Pedro 65

Ahamed, it certainly is, glad they "love" the climate here.   Pete

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comic097

Very good looking Tangas Pete, mate beside the rocks anything else you doing, mine going good but yours looks terrific 

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doranakandawatta
54 minutes ago, User00 said:

rare beauty,

Also I love the mossy bush rocks, it really matches with the palm and reminds me the boulders I have seen in Vallée de Mai, where Lodoicea, Verschaffeltia, Nephrosperma, Phoenicophorium and Deckenia grow freely. Many thanks.

Philippe

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Pedro 65
23 minutes ago, doranakandawatta said:

Also I love the mossy bush rocks, it really matches with the palm and reminds me the boulders I have seen in Vallée de Mai, where Lodoicea, Verschaffeltia, Nephrosperma, Phoenicophorium and Deckenia grow freely. Many thanks.

Philippe

Thanks Philippe, another "rare beauty" that wouldnt handle your Hot/Humid climate with no cool nights sadly :( I love to walk up the streams here collecting silt and mossy rocks for the garden. Added fun to gardening I think..     Pete

 

52 minutes ago, comic097 said:

Very good looking Tangas Pete, mate beside the rocks anything else you doing, mine going good but yours looks terrific 

Thanks Paul, look fwd to seeing yours, Bills, Tims and anyone else growing this knockout palm.     Pete.

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Kennybenjamin

Great growing as usual Pete!! Awesome sight

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Cindy Adair

I love this one Pete! Just gorgeous. 

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Pedro 65

   Thanks Ben and Cindy, are you growing Tanga Cindy ?       Pete

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Mandrew968

Cindy, I reckon you would have no problem with any New cal palm, right? Pete, Cindy may have a similar climate to yours, though I think you are a bit colder...

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Pedro 65
42 minutes ago, Mandrew968 said:

Cindy, I reckon you would have no problem with any New cal palm, right? Pete, Cindy may have a similar climate to yours, though I think you are a bit colder...

P Rico doesnt even have a true winter does it ? If Cindy can grow D/caryums no worries, Tanga should be a goer there for her.

C Tanga is from Fiji Andrew not New cal.       Pete                                                                                         

Cyphosperma tanga

Taqwa Palm

A jaw-droppingly gorgeous palm with a slender, smooth, chocolate-brown trunk to about 5 m (16 ft.) tall which holds an upright crown of large, undivided leaves to about 3 m (10 ft.) long. The pea-sized fruits mature from green over yellow and orange to bright red. It is native to the understory of very wet, mossy, montane forest on volcanic soils between 600 and 900 m (2000 and 3000 ft.) on the rocky slopes of Mt. Tomanivi, Fiji's highest mountain, located in the northern part of the island of Viti Levu. With only one small population surviving today, it is considered critically endangered. This palm has apparently not been in cultivation anywhere in the world, which makes its status in the wild even more a reason for concern. Although there are of course no experiences with its cultivation, it should be reasonable to assume that it is similarly easy to propagate as its New Caledonian relative C. balansae and would thrive under the same conditions, i.e. in a protected spot under some canopy, in well drained soil but with plenty of water, in a mild tropical or perhaps warm temperate climate that does not experience excessive heat, cold or drought.

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Mandrew968

Oh, right. I know the three species but not distinctly. I have never tried any of them. Never tried because I don't have high hopes--not becasue i don't think they are gorgeous.

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realarch

Hi Pete, your Tanga's are beautiful, in fact, all of them are beautiful.

Mine are doing well here in spite of warmer overall temps and picking up speed. Mine have developed a bifid terminal segment rather than an entire leaf. I planted out 

back in early 2013 from 1 gal. and they have been steady growers. One was always a 'runt', but it's still a handsome palm. 

Here are a few pics. The first four are Tanga One and the fifth Tanga Two. 

Tim

P1030432.jpg

P1030433.jpg

P1030436.jpg

P1030438.jpg

P1030434.jpg

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Pedro 65
34 minutes ago, realarch said:

Hi Pete, your Tanga's are beautiful, in fact, all of them are beautiful.

Mine are doing well here in spite of warmer overall temps and picking up speed. Mine have developed a bifid terminal segment rather than an entire leaf. I planted out 

back in early 2013 from 1 gal. and they have been steady growers. One was always a 'runt', but it's still a handsome palm. 

Here are a few pics. The first four are Tanga One and the fifth Tanga Two. 

Tim

P1030432.jpg

P1030433.jpg

P1030436.jpg

P1030438.jpg

P1030434.jpg

Tim, your Tanga's are looking amazing, great pics too , thanks for sharing, looks like the race is on with the Kerriodoxa behind it, with the shovel for scale, I guess Tanga 1 is a good 8ft plus ?  btw, Ive only shown 1 of my Tanga's the other entire leaves you see in my 1st pic is young D/caryums and Dypsis paludosa entire  or whatever the name is...  Thanks again and the tiny bit of yr garden displayed is looking A1 

:greenthumb:   Pete

 

 

 

 

 

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BS Man about Palms

Said to say Pete, but a couple years ago I took my eye off the Tanga prize when I chose to spend lots of time with a lady friend. A few of my more tender small things carked off at that point too, but I do think I could do OK with one here if available again as it was doing well up to that point.

Yours and Tim's are looking great!

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Pedro 65

Thanks Bill, you'll be kicking yrself in the future, that seed from RPS was a 1 of, its was a 1 of coz there was so "little" interest in this very rare palm that grow very fast for a Cyphosperma, I reckon "Many" palm enthusiasts will be kicking themselves for not buying seed when it was available, I was  having a big break from Palms when the seed came available ( very  busy house with 5 kids) but grateful Arden sold me 2.   Partners can be replaced, some Palm cant.. ;)     Pete

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Cocoa Beach Jason

Pedro that is a flawless plant. Fantastic. Thanks for sharing. 

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Cindy Adair

Tim, definitely some palm envy going on in PR at the moment!

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realarch

Thanks Pete, Bill, & Cindy, the tanga's are right outside a glass door, so I get to look at them many times a day.. Same with the Kerriodoxa, sometimes you get things in just the right spot.

Tim

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Pedro 65
16 hours ago, Cocoa Beach Jason said:

Pedro that is a flawless plant. Fantastic. Thanks for sharing. 

Thanks  Jason, the growth of Tanga  has pretty much made me Thunderstruck ( very surprised)     Pete

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realarch

New leaf opening and I couldn't resist. Such a stellar palm. 

Tim

P1030814.jpg

P1030805.jpg

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KrisKupsch

isn't this "a species" ?

thus shouldn't be referred as "TANGA"...or "Tanga"....

Edited by KrisKupsch

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Pedro 65

Kris Ive made a few threads re Cyphosperma  tanga, does it really make any differece if I write it as follows  TANGA tanga Tanga etc ????  Sorry, you dont have 1 or 2   :)   Pete

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KrisKupsch

Firstly: you write it as if only referring to a locality ie unfamiliar person could think it's an undescribed species. 

Secondly: you don't honour the species and thus the botanist who painstakingly assessed it's characters and wrote up a paper that was peer reviewed and published in a journal. 

Thirdly: you wouldn't know if I had half a dozen Cyphosperma tanga nor if I had a dozen Cyphosperma balansae because you haven't visited nor do I post images on Palmtalk like yourself. 

Fourthly: good on you. I'm a taxonomist not just a gardener or palm collector so this stuff is important to me. 

Woohoo what a Palm. The whole genus is flippen exciting 

Edited by KrisKupsch
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foxtail

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Pedro 65

Kris, taxonomist or not , maybe you should have read the whole thread, and you might have "Learnt" something..... ;)  Pete

                                                                            

Cyphosperma tanga

Taqwa Palm

A jaw-droppingly gorgeous palm with a slender, smooth, chocolate-brown trunk to about 5 m (16 ft.) tall which holds an upright crown of large, undivided leaves to about 3 m (10 ft.) long. The pea-sized fruits mature from green over yellow and orange to bright red. It is native to the understory of very wet, mossy, montane forest on volcanic soils between 600 and 900 m (2000 and 3000 ft.) on the rocky slopes of Mt. Tomanivi, Fiji's highest mountain, located in the northern part of the island of Viti Levu. With only one small population surviving today, it is considered critically endangered. This palm has apparently not been in cultivation anywhere in the world, which makes its status in the wild even more a reason for concern. Although there are of course no experiences with its cultivation, it should be reasonable to assume that it is similarly easy to propagate as its New Caledonian relative C. balansae and would thrive under the same conditions, i.e. in a protected spot under some canopy, in well drained soil but with plenty of water, in a mild tropical or perhaps warm temperate climate that does not experience excessive heat, cold or drought

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fan palm

Great palm whatever you want to call it. Yours is looking great Tim!

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Pedro 65
6 hours ago, realarch said:

New leaf opening and I couldn't resist. Such a stellar palm. 

Tim

P1030814.jpg

P1030805.jpg

Sorry Tim, I didnt even see yr new leaf post  on 1 of yr  "Terrific" TANGA< Tanga< tanga, which is a very Stellar Palm indeed esp for the very  few "keen" gardeners/collectors that have it.. :D  Pete

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KrisKupsch

Always keen to learn Pete. 

I love to follow naming protocols, it's the common-ground between people

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comic097

Tim that's a beauty mate, flawless !!!!!!

thanks for posting mate, keep the pics coming, very inspiring for our growing season ahead 

Paul 

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Frond-friend42

Hmmm. Nice thread here. 

I just got some of these seeds. Anyone have any germination tips--methods that worked or didn't?

For Taqwa palm, also known as Cyphosperma tanga?

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realarch

Ben, my tanga’s are finally producing viable seed which take, what seems forever, to ripen, I’ve been using the sphagnum moss baggie method which works well. The seed is so small it seems to be an easier way to keep track of them.

They have grown well and have slowed down after initial growth. It’s nice that they aren’t large palms and maintain a manageable scale. They’re susceptible to scale, but regular care keeps things under control. They respond rather quickly to fertilizer, in fact more than just about all the palms in the garden. Impressive palms overall. Here are some recent photos.

Tim

FF17093F-0D5A-459A-A1A9-760CB5037B5B.jpeg

43D0F63F-71A7-4BE2-883F-9130365F5156.jpeg

B80654FA-0DE4-4F98-93C4-ECE790E0744C.jpeg

0E14E747-7211-425B-9345-1C411AE6EF33.jpeg

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John hovancsek

Omg Tim. Stunning 

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