Jump to content
Tracy

Dypsis lanceolata variation

Recommended Posts

Tracy

So I have a pair of Dypsis lanceolata's growing in the yard.  Once upon a time they were both on the same side of the yard with the same exposure.  Sometime late in 2013, I transplanted one to the opposite side of the yard in a bit more sun.  While it experienced more burning initially, it seems to be slowly adapting.  The other is full shade in winter, from my house's shadow, then in spring and summer as the sun moves through a higher arc, its got sun most of the day until I planted a banana to its west to provide it pm filtered shade.
  All background, but the real question is in the photos.  As you will see D lanceolata #1, on the sunny side is quite fuzzy on the top of the leaf sheath & petiole, while D lanceolata #2 on the north side in less sun has some fuzz at the top of the leaf sheath and minimal fuzz on the petiole.  Further distinguishing them, D l #1 never has any color to the emerging leafs, while D l #2 always has some peachy tint to the emergent leaf.

Is this within the normal variation of Dypsis lanceolata, or is one more "typical" than the other?  Is one unusual for its traits?

Dypsis lanceolata #1 with fuzziness and no color to the emergent first:20160818-104A4126.thumb.jpg.f573917cee7b20160818-104A4123.thumb.jpg.04fe8c6a255e20160818-104A4124.thumb.jpg.4ba771b9ee7320160818-104A4125.thumb.jpg.7283ba95105a

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tracy

Dypsis lanceolata #2, without much fuzz but some peach tinting on the emergent leaf.20160818-104A4132.thumb.jpg.4a0d68d4411d20160818-104A4129.thumb.jpg.2b04bcf5942b20160818-104A4130.thumb.jpg.13a3d55d27be

  • Like 1
  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
quaman58

Tracy,

I've got a couple different variations as well. When I first started collecting, the ones available nearly always had a peach colored "push"; they seemed slow to me & I could not nurse them into full sun easily, even here on the coast. I lost the one I had in the 2007 freeze. Later on, came a much hardier version that the guys at Jungle Music jokingly called "lanceonada". It is much fuzzier on the petioles, & for me, grows faster & better in full sun. I've since found another one of those early versions. It is prettier imo, but is more cold sensitive, sun sensitive, & is just slower overall. Almost no fuzz whatsoever. I'm sure there are other versions out there; yours looks plenty happy!

 

Bret

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tracy
2 hours ago, quaman58 said:

Later on, came a much hardier version that the guys at Jungle Music jokingly called "lanceonada". It is much fuzzier on the petioles, & for me, grows faster & better in full sun.

Very interesting.  I bought a lanceonada from Phil & Jessie at Jungle Music (2011 sometime), and brought it over in a pot.  It actually seemed more sensitive to sun to me.  I put it in the ground and the main trunk died (rot) shortly after I put it in the ground winter of 2015.  About the same time there was a new little offshoot.  I have had two leaves on that and one new leaf spike pushing which I hope opens before autumn.  The "lanceonada" was/is slow for me.  The attached photo is the "lanceonada" from 2011, while still in a pot in my Carlsbad backyard.  Funny to see all those pots in the background, which had small cycads in them, that are now in the ground here in Leucadia.  Hard to tell from this photo, but I wonder if this is what yours looked like.20111112-IMG_9039.thumb.jpg.55924b869e5e

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tracy
On 8/18/2016, 7:38:52, quaman58 said:

When I first started collecting, the ones available nearly always had a peach colored "push"; they seemed slow to me & I could not nurse them into full sun easily, even here on the coast.

I wish that both of my plants pushed with the colorful leaf, but it is as you observed, the slower, more sun sensitive plant which has them even as the plant has ringed trunk.  Meanwhile, the fuzzy and faster variety never shows color on the newly emerging leaves.  Anyone have photos and experience with the colorful, variety of Dypsis lanceolata as a fully mature, flowering plant?  Here is the colorful one with the ringed trunk opening a new leaf.

20170524-104A6553.jpg

20170524-104A6555-2.jpg

20170524-104A6554.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tracy

The always green emergent leaf plant, which handles the sun so much better.

20170524-104A6557.jpg

20170524-104A6558.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tracy

I'm still seeing colorful emergent leaves, but the difference in trunk size between my two Dypsis lanceolata is becoming ever more apparent.  The colorful leaf plant and narrower gauge trunk plant also is more susceptible to burning in too much sun as well as being more cold sensitive.  Here it is in 2019.  The white on the plant's trunk also makes me suspect a possible hybrid, but what?

20190611-104A3825.jpg

20190611-104A3826.jpg

20190611-104A3827.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tracy

Once again the difference in trunk thickness with what I will call the typical Dypsis lanceolata, more sun and cold tolerance as well.  Which variation of Dypsis lanceolata are you growing and are you seeing a performance difference if you have a couple of forms?20190611-104A3829.thumb.jpg.1d9289341fc339bfd8b5b4598ac32169.jpg20190611-104A3830.thumb.jpg.534d6a32d0cffff369e81610fb3bf173.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
redant

No real comment on your question, just a heads up for FL folks that these do great in FL, super easy and beautiful palm.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Brett in Mission Viejo

I have the two different Lanceolate varieties planted side by side in my garden. One was an earlier JD Anderson variety, the other the later "Lanceonada" Jungle Music variety. As noted above, there are big differences in growth rate, cold hardiness, trunk diameter, fuzziness, etc., with the "Lanceonada" version being way more hardy. Interestingly, the JD Anderson plant turned out as a single trunk variety. Here is a side by side photo (The Baronii in the middle took a beating this year with our long cool rainy spring):

Lanceolata_Differences.thumb.jpg.78093f834fc055915c6ec982b950bb31.jpg

Check out the battle scars on the JD Anderson variety trunk (I know I should probably remove this palm, but....):

Battle_Scars.thumb.jpg.77c70ee15cd19f2611a8df5df75c5078.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tracy
4 hours ago, Brett in Mission Viejo said:

As noted above, there are big differences in growth rate, cold hardiness, trunk diameter, fuzziness, etc., with the "Lanceonada" version being way more hardy.

Interesting that your "Lanconada" looks like my more vigorous form of Dypsis lanceolata.  My "Lanceo-nada" which re-sprouted after the original plant died of pink rot is still quite small and seems slower.  It's difficult to photograph because I didn't dig the roots out, but had planted other plants adjacent to it because I didn't expect it to put up a new growth point.  For now it's hidden behind a clumping of solitary Chamaedoreas and a Cussonia spicata tree.  The Cussonia will give it head room by the end of the summer I'm sure, because it really puts on growth during the summer months.   It will be interesting to see if the "Lanceo-Nada" turns out to look like my green Dypsis lanceolata or something else.  Your JD Anderson looks to have the thinner trunk like my plant that puts out the colorful leaves too.  No battle scars yet on my trunk though!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tracy
5 hours ago, redant said:

No real comment on your question, just a heads up for FL folks that these do great in FL, super easy and beautiful palm.

Which variation do you see or both?  Deep green ringed trunks or slightly powdery green?  Colorful emergent leaves or green?  I've suspected for a while that the one with the colorful emergent leaf, slightly powdery green ringed trunk and slimmer trunk is a Dypsis lanceolata hybrid, but no idea what with.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tracy
16 hours ago, Tracy said:

The colorful leaf plant and narrower gauge trunk plant also is more susceptible to burning in too much sun as well as being more cold sensitive.  Here it is in 2019.  The white on the plant's trunk also makes me suspect a possible hybrid, but what?

20190611-104A3825.jpg

I forgot to point out that with this one I also see a lot of limbs which can't support themselves over time.  They are still alive and green but they end up bending down until they hit the ground or another plant to support them.  You can probably see where I've had to cut some off prematurely because they are both an eye sore and a problem if my dog tries to walk around them.

20190611-104A3825-2.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
redant
3 hours ago, Tracy said:

Which variation do you see or both?  Deep green ringed trunks or slightly powdery green?  Colorful emergent leaves or green?  I've suspected for a while that the one with the colorful emergent leaf, slightly powdery green ringed trunk and slimmer trunk is a Dypsis lanceolata hybrid, but no idea what with.

I have about 25 in the ground but they are all from the same parent so they all seem pretty much the same.  I'll though in a couple pics tomorrow.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
joe_OC

I've heard from other growers that the robust form has flower inflorescence that open after barely exposed from the sheath while the less robust form extends much further out and are much more branching.

Edited by joe_OC

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Daryl

I had two forms growing in my old garden...The robust one was faster and more robust in every way. The smaller one threw nice colourful new leaves...you can see it in the centre of this photo...

 

DSC_7656.thumb.jpg.514ad56771cd39e08e26aa94bf250c9e.jpg

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tracy
13 hours ago, joe_OC said:

I've heard from other growers that the robust form has flower inflorescence that open after barely exposed from the sheath while the less robust form extends much further out and are much more branching.

This is the inflorescence on my more vigorous growing one.  I can't compare to my less vigorous plant because it still hasn't produced one yet.

20171011-104A7696.jpg

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Brett in Mission Viejo
5 hours ago, Tracy said:

This is the inflorescence on my more vigorous growing one.  I can't compare to my less vigorous plant because it still hasn't produced one yet.

Same here. No flowers on my less vigorous JD Anderson variety, which is 10 years older than my vigorous Lanceonada seeding version pictured here:

Lanceonada_Seeds.thumb.jpg.deaa0f45cb1b3c7ef92bf7d337c14529.jpg

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
joe_OC

Brett and Tracy,

 

Both of yours' bloom like the lanceolata from Rancho Soledad.  This is what I refer to as the standard form of lanceolata.

Edited by joe_OC
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
tim_brissy_13

Can anyone compare the cold/cool hardiness of the vigorous form of lanceolata to other clumping Dypsis (eg lutescens, arenarum, pembana)?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
richnorm
13 hours ago, tim_brissy_13 said:

Can anyone compare the cold/cool hardiness of the vigorous form of lanceolata to other clumping Dypsis (eg lutescens, arenarum, pembana)?

Way less heat demanding than lutescens but not quite as robust as say baronii or onilahensis.  Easy enough to grow well in Auckland without special care though seedlings don't like winter.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
tim_brissy_13
On 6/15/2019 at 4:44 AM, richnorm said:

Way less heat demanding than lutescens but not quite as robust as say baronii or onilahensis.  Easy enough to grow well in Auckland without special care though seedlings don't like winter.

Thanks Rich, there’s a few decent lutescens around Melbourne although most look ugly. Sounds like lanceolata has some promise. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Similar Content

    • Tracy
      By Tracy
      Early this morning I was in the garden walking by an Archontophoenix cunninghamiana inflorescence which drew my attention not by site, but by the sound of a multitude of bees swarming on its flowers.  I walked to another part of the garden, where flowers were blooming on my Dypsis lanceolata's inflorescence where one lone bee was working.  Later in the day, I repeated the walk and the same thing.  I've noticed this in the past, that bees seem to be much more attracted to my Archontophoenix flowers than the flowers of most Dypsis or Chamaedoreas.  Anyone else notice this phenomena?  The other genus that attracts lots of bees seems to be Phoenix species I've grown (reclinata and roebelenii).  Anyone else notice that some palm flowers seem to attract more bees than others in their garden? The Archonotphoenix:


    • Tracy
      By Tracy
      My Dypsis lanceolata has been flowering for a couple of years now, and the most recent flowers actually matured to the jelly bean size green fruit seen in the photo below.  Previously, the fruit was significantly smaller than a kernel of corn.  I'm looking for feedback from others on this species as to whether these look like they will produce viable seeds.  The bees were having a field day back when these were flowering.  I was kind of hoping they would go over to visit my flowering Dypsis  prestoniana in between gathering pollen at this lanceolata, as that might prove to give me something interesting.  I'm not holding my breath on that even though the plants are about 30' apart.  Will lanceolata fruit change color when it's "ripe" and ready to harvest seeds or are they green?

    • Tracy
      By Tracy
      So while I have read and heard from others that pink rot fungus is normally a fatal disease, I have had a couple of leaves on two trunks of my Dypsis lanceolata which at different times had pink rot.  The pink was readily visible after the crownshaft came off the trunk, but new leaves pushed after my treatment with an antifungal liquid.  In the photos below, the crownshaft had just come off, with the second photo showing the shriveled leaf which emerged, alerting me to the problem.  Note that it is pushing a healthy new spear after the diseased one.  One other stem had a similar problem on this Dypsis lanceolata last year, and after treating it has pushed a couple of healthy new leaves.  Bottom line, I'm hopeful that I got to it in time, but only time will tell.  I'll be monitoring this plant, but if you have palms which survived the nasty fungal pink rot, share your story.


    • Tracy
      By Tracy
      I have a couple of Dypsis prestoniana in my garden.  One was newly planted at the end of last spring and has been slow to get established, while the one that has been in the garden for a couple of years has always been a good grow for me.  The newer planted seems to me to have narrower leaflets, and doesn't have the same beefy trunk when comparing the two plants.  I'm not sure if the newer one will start to resemble the older one with time and pick up speed, but thought I would toss this out there with photos of both.  The newer one came out of a 15 gallon and was top heavy in winds so I staked it down when planting it.  First the new one, then the established presto in the last 2 photos for comparison.
      Comments and thoughts appreciated.






    • Tracy
      By Tracy
      My Dypsis lanceolata is flowering again, and I was curious how long it will take from flowers before I would have viable seeds to harvest?  It may be interesting to hear the responses not only here in my local climate of Southern California, but in other parts of the world as well.  My suspicion is that in tropical climates it will happen faster than here, but share your experiences.  Thanks in advance for responses.



×