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Jeff Searle

Madagascar Expedition "06"

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Jeff Searle

Later in the afternoon, Bill and I dropped of Guy after returning to the capital. Pete had still not returned from down south, so much of the following day we did nothing. We did walk over to a bookstore and I bought another map of the country and a dictionary on Malagasy words. Pete finally arrived at 9pm that night.

    The next morning, we had a scheduled flight from Tana up to Maroantsetra for another long stay down at Camp Tampolo on the Masoala peninsula. After boarding the plane, we waiting approx. 2 1/2 hours, only to be told that we were getting off because of mechanical problems. Air madagascar then drove us to the White Horse Inn for an overnight stay. We were told that at 6:00am the following morning, we would have the next flight out. These last two days sort of went by the wayside, but things like this usually happen over hear. Out in the parking lot, was this very nice Dypsis baronii growing.

Jeff

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Jeff Searle

Great color in the crownshaft.

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Jeff Searle

Also growing in the parking lot was this unusual form of a poinsettia plant.

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Jeff Searle

Same.

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Jeff Searle

Same. I was able to buy 3 plants down near Ambositra, which are still growing back at the nursery.

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Jeff Searle

We finally arrived in Maroantsetra. We arranged to go to Camp Tampolo to spend a few days by boat. This is Joseph, who owns the camp, pushing us off for the 2 hour ride down.

Jeff

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Jeff Searle

This was the same flowering tree we saw on the previous trip there. Any guesses on what it might be?

Jeff

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Jeff Searle

This we think was the solid leaf form of Dypsis forficifolia.

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Jeff Searle

And the stems of the same palm. (sorry for the poor picture quality)

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Jeff Searle

These large understory palms are still a mystery. The first time that Pete and Bill saw these, they referred to them as the blue/gray palm, because of a tinge of color on the leaves.

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Jeff Searle

Another look.

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Jeff Searle

The base of the trunk, same palm species(?)

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Jeff Searle

Same.

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BS Man about Palms

(Jeff Searle @ Apr. 26 2007,18:37)

QUOTE
These large understory palms are still a mystery. The first time that Pete and Bill saw these, they referred to them as the blue/gray palm, because of a tinge of color on the leaves.

Do I know this palm?  ???

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Zac in NC

(Jeff Searle @ Apr. 26 2007,21:19)

QUOTE
This was the same flowering tree we saw on the previous trip there. Any guesses on what it might be?

Jeff

Jeff- It looks like something in the Rubiaceae, but I don't know a genus right now. Sorry.

Zac

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Jeff Searle

Once again we found this area of Satranala decussilvae. Many of these large palms were plentiful. But in the case as last year, they were just flowering, and no seed were on the trees.

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Jeff Searle

Detail of some of the flowers. It was nearly impossible to get the overall palm in the picture.

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Jeff Searle

This is looking at a very large Dypsis carlsmithii. After looking around for a smaller one to photograph, I could only find these large giants. The only way you could photograph these were to stand underneath them and look straight up. They were probably about 40-60' tall.

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Jeff Searle

One more look.

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Jeff Searle

A very large leaf emerging out of the ground. No idea on the species.

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Jeff Searle

Sarafin, Pete and Bill

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Jeff Searle

A large stout palm that seem to always have a messy appearance.

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Jeff Searle

Another look.

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Jeff Searle

An unusual groundcover.

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Kris

Dear Jeff  :)

iam a person who loves variety,at times i felt boring seeing only dypsis in our forum discussions.but the winds of change

has blown over our threads_courtesy Dear Jeff !  :)

thanks man great plants and that blue fruits were making my mouth water prufusely_is it edible ?

and our friend the double O7 was seen in a casual mode with some lovely creatures they were new to me...

and that tour should have been a relaxing & a regunivation one for your team_am i right on this  :D

thanks & Lots of love,

Kris  :)

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elHoagie

Amazing Jeff!  Thanks for posting.

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Jeff Searle

Taking a much needed break on the trail. It had been raining alot,allthough refreshing.

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Jeff Searle

And our guide.

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Jeff Searle

A very large Orania ravaka. This palm we saw very few of in the area.

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Jeff Searle

Up close look.

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Jeff Searle

This was a palm that none of us understood. We thought Ravenea, but no clue on the species.

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Jeff Searle

Another look.

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Jeff Searle

A very beautiful palm and one that should be grown more is this Ravenea dransfieldii.

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Jeff Searle

Another look showing the beautiful colors in the crown.

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Jeff Searle

One last look.

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Dave-Vero

That "other tree" may very well be Rubiaceae (4 corolla lobes).  Not a Clerodendrum.  Must be serviced by an incredibly long-tongued nectar sucker.  Reminds me just a bit of today's NY Times story on ducks.

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Jeff Searle

Here was some kind of weird seed pod down low on a tree.

Jeff

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Jeff Searle

A view of just how thick the forest can be.

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Jeff Searle

This is looking through the forest at one of only a few trails that are available to use.

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Jeff Searle

At Camp Tampolo, this is one of 5 bungalows that are there that travelers can use. They can sleep from one to four people, and are actually very comfortable. There is no electric, and each comes with a small candle to be used at night. This camp is approx. 100' from the shoreline.

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