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PalmTreeDude

Here are some palm trees from Virginia Beach, VA. 

 

 

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PalmTreeDude

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PalmTreeDude

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PalmTreeDude

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SubTropicRay

Nice annuals they plant there.:rolleyes:

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RedRabbit
8 hours ago, SubTropicRay said:

Nice annuals they plant there.:rolleyes:

LOL, yep!

Back when I lived in Ocean City, MD they would bring in a bunch of coconuts every year for tourist season. They looked real nice and they thrive up there!.. You know, that is until October (or maybe November in a good year). :unsure:

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PalmTreeDude
8 hours ago, SubTropicRay said:

Nice annuals they plant there.:rolleyes:

 

10 minutes ago, RedRabbit said:

LOL, yep!

Back when I lived in Ocean City, MD they would bring in a bunch of coconuts every year for tourist season. They looked real nice and they thrive up there!.. You know, that is until October (or maybe November in a good year). :unsure:

The only palms that I see around and in VA beach that survive year round outdoors are Needles, Sabal minor, Sabal palmetto (normally the ones planted in peoples yards), Butias, Mediterainian Fan Palms, and sometimes a Washintonia robust, for a few years, I have seen some Filiferas though that looked like they lasted a good 10 + years!

Edited by PalmTreeDude

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Mr.SamuraiSword
On 8/30/2016, 10:00:28, PalmTreeDude said:

 

The only palms that I see around and in VA beach that survive year round outdoors are Needles, Sabal minor, Sabal palmetto (normally the ones planted in peoples yards), Butias, Mediterainian Fan Palms, and sometimes a Washintonia robust, for a few years, I have seen some Filiferas though that looked like they lasted a good 10 + years!

dont forget trachycarpus palms. they survive in connecticut as well

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PalmTreeDude
4 hours ago, Mr.SamuraiSword said:

dont forget trachycarpus palms. they survive in connecticut as well

Ah! Yes, thanks for reminding me! They do very well there.

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DCA_Palm_Fan
On August 30, 2016 at 5:42:22 PM, Zeeth said:

Yikes. These pics from Virginia Beach look a lot better:

http://forums.gardenweb.com/discussions/2106572/small-taste-of-virginia-beach

I have to disagree with the "annuals" comment.  

That thread you liked to from garden web contains a ton of photos of thrivingmature palms that are still there to this day.   The ones that most see along the immediate coast  are typically not as nice and have about a 50/50 success rate.  You'll see dead ones, next to new ones with no crown, next to some that have been in place for 10 years or more.    There are plenty of palms at private residences that have been there for 20-30 years.  In fact if you read that thread and scroll down in it there is a poster that posts pics of their yard.  I know for a fact those palms (sabals) have been there for at least 20 years.  Likely longer.   Sadly,  I'm not sure if they still life there or not though.

 

  One thing you will notice is that palms in protected places from the often strong winter winds and / or in south sides of buildings, or away from the immediate beach, often survive and do much better than those right next to or on the beach front,   

The person the toosted in the linked thread that I know,  are / were in the Pungo area.  Some of those photos are also in Sandbridge out on the beginning of the barrie islands of the outer banks.  

Here are are several  more photos of long term survivors in the beachfront city part of VB. Many of the really old ones that lined parking lots were sadly removed as those lots have now formed into tall buildings or parking garages.  One such lot is shown in the third pic down   That pic is 5 years ago or older still.  Most of the ones in these photos are still there as every time I'm there I drive up and down to look.   

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Zeeth
2 hours ago, DCA_Palm_Fan said:

I have to disagree with the "annuals" comment.  

I think Ray's "annuals" comment was about the queen palms and pygmy date palms, which are zone 9 palms and will most likely not survive one single winter in Virginia beach. 

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DCA_Palm_Fan
4 minutes ago, Zeeth said:

I think Ray's "annuals" comment was about the queen palms and pygmy date palms, which are zone 9 palms and will most likely not survive one single winter in Virginia beach. 

You know you're probably right.  I didn't think of that. Lol.  Those are definitely annuals there. No two ways about that.  Lol.  

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PalmTreeDude

I have seen 30 foot tall Sabal palmettos before about half a mile inland in neighborhoods. They have a full head of healthy fronds and it almost reminds me of South Carolina.

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ExoticPalms

I've been to Virginia beach twice for many weeks both times, and I can't recall ever seeing any palm trees ever, I guess they didn't really pop like the amount that warmer climates do. I checked google maps and scrolled through street view out of curiosity a few months back and found a handful; 90% of them looked like they sustained heavy winter damage or something, very sickly looking. A lot of them had one or two live fronds without anything else or mostly just dead hanging fronds. When I was around the urban shopping centers and stuff and walking down the streets, It seemed like I never left NY state. Would have been nicer to be around some at the time I think. 

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NorCalKing

Funny, I just checked google maps myself and struggled to find any as well. With the exception of the immediate beach/hotels. Also looking at the winter/fall pics when the leaves have fallen from most the trees, it looks anything but tropical. Maybe the locals can link some of the better palm streets from google maps :yay:

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Cindy Adair

I lived in Virginia Beach from 1983-2015 so I am pretty familiar with the plants there!

Trachycarpus fortunei seemed bulletproof.

The other palms at the ocean front would look good for only a small percentage of the year in my opinion.

There are other non palm tropical looking plants and yes, lots of us put tropicals in pots and hauled them in and out of greenhouses. The local big box stores  sell non hardy palms for those that wanted annuals.

I miss the Ginkgo trees that look lovely in that city, but without a greenhouse, head to other places for the best palms in my opinion.

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Las Palmas Norte

Looks like the average winter lows are just above the freeze point in VB.

link >>> Virginia Beach climate data

Cheers, Barrie.

 

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Cindy Adair

Interesting website, but not what I experienced living there!

I often read average winter low as 20 degrees F which makes sense to me, but once in my early years there it hit zero degrees F.

Typically we had at least one snow a year and some winters quite a bit more.

We had a number of "hard frosts" every year for sure which is why I ended up with two backyard greenhouses and then a move to Puerto Rico.

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DCA_Palm_Fan
On 10/9/2016, 8:31:33, Cindy Adair said:

Interesting website, but not what I experienced living there!

I often read average winter low as 20 degrees F which makes sense to me, but once in my early years there it hit zero degrees F.

Typically we had at least one snow a year and some winters quite a bit more.

We had a number of "hard frosts" every year for sure which is why I ended up with two backyard greenhouses and then a move to Puerto Rico.

  Just curious, what part of Va Beach did you live in?  Just curious. 

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Cindy Adair

Not too far from Home Depot and the central library.

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DCA_Palm_Fan

Ill have some photos to add to this thread soon.  Im in VA Beach again.  As usual most ocean front palms are badly burned from cold winds. Everything a block or more inland looks fantastic like you would find in SC.  Windmill popularity is really taking off here.  I have seen just as many of those (hundreds) if not more than Sabals, even in areas far west like Smithfield area.  There are even some sabals out there too.   Ill post some photos soon. 

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TedNoah1

I just left Norfolk/VA Beach / Portsmouth area and saw TONS of Chinese Windmill Palms.  Lots of people have them in their yards. Several cabbages and windmills along the boardwalk area too.

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PalmTreeDude

I completely forgot about this thread, looks like I can add some more myself from my recent visit (2019). 

 

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