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Kris

Corypha Macropoda Palm Planting Work_July_2016

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Kris

Dear Friends,

I welcome you all to another palm planting work,And this time its my favorite palm "Corypha Macropoda Palm". Like always we dug up the soil about 3feet

x 3feet by 3feet depth since our garden soil is just clayey. All our palms had grown well in washed river sand.So this time we just filled the pit only with coarse grade sandy soil,little bit of coarse grade perlite,And some neem composite since i have here termite and fire ants problem.visuals of that work can be seen in following post.And i call this operation as "Operation Sandy".Once the palm stabilizes in its new home,we will feed it with nutrients.

And my special thanks to my ranch hand,without who's help this entire work would not have been possible.

Thanks and Love,

Kris.

 

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Kris

Here's a still of my ranch hand..

20160515_R2.thumb.jpg.53ed217cea49a6a66d

This is the pit that we dug up !

20160515_123247.thumb.jpg.118291d81264d8

 

We got washed river sand(coarse grade)..

20160720_R1.thumb.jpg.fdc5d5254e542fc0dd

20160720_163545.thumb.jpg.2e748bcc53a857

...

Edited by Kris
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Kris

Now we had to cut the barrel/container in which this palm grew all these years..

20160722_101048.thumb.jpg.b3216d57b4d1c6

20160722_101725.thumb.jpg.52def5979307b2

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Now the palm is lowered in the pit,which is already is half filled with sandy soil to the desired level and the palm is gently lowered in to its new home..

20160722_102442.thumb.jpg.7f9cb479b855c9

We have added some course grade perlite,for come moisture retention during summer season,Since its soil now is fast draining..

20160722_102556.thumb.jpg.e39230773e03e1

A metal water pipe is placed in this pit,so that when water hose is moved around the garden it does not pull the palm fronds..

20160722_103145.thumb.jpg.ec71b1f34aa667

...

 

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Kris

Now we started watering this pit with sandy soil and neem composite..

20160722_103746.thumb.jpg.68ddc74ce29f65

Now we started to flood this pit so that sandy soil levels itself and all the air pockets and empty space are compacted..

20160722_103938.thumb.jpg.18fc1b1aa8ba86

This is how it is as of now,More updates later..

20160722_104531.thumb.jpg.c5aa2a88816dc6

 

Thanks and love,

Kris.

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PalmatierMeg

Great work, Kris.

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Kris

Dear Meg Thanks for visiting this thread.

Now lets see a brief history of this palm's seed germination and its growth rate :

Some details of Corypha Macropoda Palm Itself :

Hope some day even this palm becomes fairly big enough for future generation to see and admire..

Love,

Kris.

 

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Kris

Here's a still of this baby palm...Some of its fronds are damaged while lifting it and while cutting open its container.This is the condition of the palm as of today.

20160728_114052.thumb.jpg.35f7483a9cfca8

Love,

Kris.

 

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Mandrew968

That's a pretty gnarly digging tool, your ranch hand has there... Good luck with your 'bigfoot' Corypha!

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Tropicgardener

Very impressive Kris !!

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Howeadypsis

Nice work Kris

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Peter Pacific

Looks great Kris!  It will be gorgeous before you know it!

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Kris

Dear Friends,

Thanks for all your comments.

Love you all,

Kris.

 

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HurryUp&Grow

Thanks for sharing, Kris! Love the pots you're using in the photos.

It looks like the roots got pretty bound up at the bottom. Did you scrape or cut them free before planting? Or did you simply plant as-is and let nature run its course? Not a criticism, just curious is all.

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Kris

Dear  Tom Petrosk,

Thanks for visiting this thread,Those pots seen above are industrial chemical barrels very strong and UV stabilized and are very cheap compared to nursery pots.We never disturb or free the roots manually,those that are seen cut were due the result of the barrel cutting and palm pulling out operation and its purely unintentional.We don't like even that to happen but cannot be avoided since the roots all try to come out of the drain holes and make contact with the garden soil below.

And Iam open to suggestions,opinions,advise and even criticism ,So kindly feel free to interact,Only then i can grow...

Lots of love,

Kris.

 

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HurryUp&Grow
On 8/3/2016, 3:47:12, Kris said:

Dear  Tom Petrosk,

Thanks for visiting this thread,Those pots seen above are industrial chemical barrels very strong and UV stabilized and are very cheap compared to nursery pots.We never disturb or free the roots manually,those that are seen cut were due the result of the barrel cutting and palm pulling out operation and its purely unintentional.We don't like even that to happen but cannot be avoided since the roots all try to come out of the drain holes and make contact with the garden soil below.

And Iam open to suggestions,opinions,advise and even criticism ,So kindly feel free to interact,Only then i can grow...

Lots of love,

Kris.

 

Hi Kris,

I like those barrels too, but I meant your ceramic square pots. :)

 

Also, I just wanted to share with you that I read you should never mess with the roots of a palm since they're not like the roots of other plants. So leaving the palm alone was actually the correct choice. 

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