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Anyone Got Pictures of zone 8+ Palms In Zone 7 or Below?

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PalmTreeDude

Yeah, I believe they put a box around them with heat. 

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PalmTreeDude
1 hour ago, GeorgiaPalms said:

That sounds like a good idea and I am curious to see how it will turn out for you. It seems the first couple years are the most important and they seem susceptible to issues within that period. 

I don't know if you have seen this article before,

https://subtropicalmemphis.wordpress.com/2015/04/30/long-term-sabal-palmetto-in-memphis-tn/

 

It is an interesting post about S.Palmetto in Memphis, TN. They're also zone 7 I believe.

I will post how they do. I think after about 3 - 4 years in the ground they will need no protection. They will be so established at that point.

Edited by PalmTreeDude

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smithgn
On ‎7‎/‎27‎/‎2016‎ ‎9‎:‎49‎:‎59‎, GeorgiaPalms said:

Yeah, we are just a bit farther from the coast here and not in the coastal plains but in the piedmont. There are actually quite a few palms in and around Atlanta. Piedmont Park has quite a few Trachycarpus, and they are not uncommon to see in residential areas. There are also quite a few around Inman Park located in front of some houses, some specimens that are really quite tall and old. The most popular and most common palms for the area are the Trachycarpus, by far. The S.Palmetto and Butias are not common at all, and I only know of a few examples of each in the area, but there very well could be some I have missed. I also do see S.Minor, R.Hystrix and some saw palmettos like in the photo I posted on my previous post. There seem to be more palms showing up in commercial zoned plantings, which is quite nice and breaks away from the overly used crape myrtles. There very well may be some at the zoo, I haven't been there in many years so I am uncertain. I moved here from Jacksonville Beach FL back in 1998 when I was a child.

Interesting. Yeah, it's been a while since I've been to Atlanta but it's good commercial  landscapers are starting to plant palm stuff. Crape myrtles are WAY overused. Their only saving grace is the fact they're almost always blooming in the summertime and thrive in climates like Atlanta and Columbia. I can't get over the fact that they're deciduous and leave a very stark, dead look in the winter time. Trachy's are almost perfect for Atlanta and should take the 7B dips that Atlanta sees here and there.

1 hour ago, TexasColdHardyPalms said:

These queens won't make it at all. I'm 8b and still have to drive 170 miles south towards houston before seeing a queen that was planted more than 4 years ago. They are a 9a palm at best.

I agree. 9a at best. I've seen some in Savannah, Georgia, and even those are in very protected microclimates. No way those queens in Va. Beach have a chance, but hey, you've got to give 'em an "A" for effort. I planted a Queen from a big box store up against my house about a month ago :D More of an experiment than anything else, since It was only 6 bucks.

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ChrisA

How long have you lived there PalmTreeDude? If you're 7b then I would think you'd see lower than that.  What's your average low then? I'm in zone 7b/8a and the lowest I've seen is -6, the average low is maybe around 12. The all time low is -17F, back in the early 70's.   Good luck with the Sabal palmetto, I would think it should do well in your area with what everyone else is saying.  YuccaDo might still have some Birmingham for sale, supposedly they are quite tolerant to cold.  I will see how mine does this next winter (first in the ground).

Good night everyone!

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PalmTreeDude
24 minutes ago, ChrisA said:

How long have you lived there PalmTreeDude? If you're 7b then I would think you'd see lower than that.  What's your average low then? I'm in zone 7b/8a and the lowest I've seen is -6, the average low is maybe around 12. The all time low is -17F, back in the early 70's.   Good luck with the Sabal palmetto, I would think it should do well in your area with what everyone else is saying.  YuccaDo might still have some Birmingham for sale, supposedly they are quite tolerant to cold.  I will see how mine does this next winter (first in the ground).

Good night everyone!

I have lived there for 9 years, the lowest I ever recall (when I looked on the weather channel) was 7 degrees F.  The average low is actually 7 degrees itself. Could it have been lower? Of course and I bet it has quite a few times! I remembered the winter days (In January) where normally around 25 F in the morning, 30 - 45 in the evening, and around 15 at night, normally. The only time I would see it go lower than that was when there is a snowstorm, which I didn't even see that often. 

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ChrisA

That sounds a lot like where I live, except you definitely get more rain!  Are you currently growing any palms?

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Mr.SamuraiSword
12 hours ago, TexasColdHardyPalms said:

These queens won't make it at all. I'm 8b and still have to drive 170 miles south towards houston before seeing a queen that was planted more than 4 years ago. They are a 9a palm at best.

Agreed. ive never seen them survive north of southern georgia

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PalmTreeDude
3 hours ago, ChrisA said:

That sounds a lot like where I live, except you definitely get more rain!  Are you currently growing any palms?

Yeah, I am going back to VA for awhile (with Sabal palmetto) and I currently have two Pindos, one Mediterranean Fan Palm, a Needle Palm, and a Windmill Palm. Search my forum post "Virginia Palm Trees" in discussing palms worldwide.

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NorCalKing
13 hours ago, PalmTreeDude said:

I have lived there for 9 years, the lowest I ever recall (when I looked on the weather channel) was 7 degrees F.  The average low is actually 7 degrees itself. Could it have been lower? Of course and I bet it has quite a few times! I remembered the winter days (In January) where normally around 25 F in the morning, 30 - 45 in the evening, and around 15 at night, normally. The only time I would see it go lower than that was when there is a snowstorm, which I didn't even see that often. 

Better hope you don't get too many more like these doozies lol

https://www.sercc.com/climateinfo/historical/recordlow.html

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pennerchris@gmail.com

The first pic is the only large Filifera that I've found in Lubbock (Zone 7b, but near the 7a border). I was told that it's been unprotected for the last 12 years, and has seen temps below 5f several times, along with tons of snow.

The second one is in Lamesa, Texas (Zone 7b). It's also been unprotected for over a decade.

Filifera.jpg

Lamesa Filifera.jpg

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PalmTreeDude

Filifera truly seem to be a 7b palm, 7a is about their limit. I am trying one or two of these next year in Virginia! 

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john_tas
On 25 July 2016 at 4:19:52 PM, nitsua0895 said:

I'm in borderline zone 8a/b but have two zone 10 palms in my yard. One is a Phoenix Roebelini which was unscathed last winter with the help of a heated greenhouse but probably could have survived on its own with some damage since we only had one night of 25F. Hopefully this winter is another mild one.

And I also planted a Ravenea Rivularis early this spring and plan to use the same greenhouse protection for it this winter. So far it is growing very well in an area of my yard that only gets about two hours of direct sunlight each day.

 

image.png

image.jpeg

Nice plants, today For the first time in my area I saw these Roebelini outside and unprotected in 8b here in Tasmania, they looks ratty but have obviously been growing well for some time, after today I'd say this species is 8b unless its maybe a hybrid 

image.png

Edited by john_tas

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TexasColdHardyPalms

Pygmy dates are not even close to being an 8B plant.  They flat out die here during our occasional 9A winters before they have a chance to test their luck during an 8B winter.  I have a hard time keeping them in an unheated greenhouse during 8B winters.

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john_tas
16 hours ago, TexasColdHardyPalms said:

Pygmy dates are not even close to being an 8B plant.  They flat out die here during our occasional 9A winters before they have a chance to test their luck during an 8B winter.  I have a hard time keeping them in an unheated greenhouse during 8B winters.

Yeah you're right I meant 9b/9a, no way are they 8b, I could be accused of trolling for suggesting that :)

 

Edited by john_tas
Brain freeze

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Mr.SamuraiSword
On 7/25/2016, 4:29:40, PalmTreeDude said:

Amazing, anyone know of a TRUSTED online store where I could order a Washintonia Filifera? 

ebay has good deals.  not exactly trusted but ive ordered trachy palms off there and they were fine

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PalmTreeDude

I wonder how these palms will do this winter! 

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Henoh
On 7/28/2016, 7:21:44, ChrisA said:

Lol!  Queens stand no chance in Connecticut!  I like the lights though. 

 

Thanks Sailor!  That Robustifera/filibusta was purchased at a nursery in Phoenix back in 2007 if I remember correctly.  It's had very little protection aside from siting and has occasionally lost all fronds, such as in 2011 (which, like yours, nearly killed it).

 

im excited about the Butia (Henoh, yours looks GREAT!), and would like to see a few very mild winters to let my new palms get more established before some reality sets in.  I know the Canary Island is a pipe-dream and that it will need consistent protection unless global warming steps it up a bit more quickly. I don't think they will ever become tolerant to frigid temps, even once mature.  I've seen large specimens completely burnt in Sierra Vista, AZ which is quite a bit warmer than Albuquerque. So I am hoping to enjoy it for a few years if possible. Again it was only about $20 so it wasn't a huge investment.

 

Henoh, what temps do you normally see in the winter in your zone 7 climate?  And what kind of Sycamores are those in the background?

 

SailorBold, I have heard of the Butia-Jubaea crossed but am afraid I don't have anymore room for more experimenting! (How's that possible?) I still have to find a nice spot for my Trachycarpus! 

 

Enjoy the the rest of summer! Y'all!

Hi Chris, sorry I didn't see your message until now. Usually we have mostly dry and hot summers. Growing season starts from middle of March and prolongs to the middle of October, sometimes even to the early November. Winter minimums usually ranges from -18 to -12 (cca 10 F to 0F) Summer highs ranges from 30- 35, and sometimes up to 40 Celsius.In background is bamboo Paeudosasa japonica and on the right side is Diospyros kaki 'tipo'.

Edited by Henoh
Typo

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Henoh

This is how I protect my Butia and B. armata.When rely cold weather approach I add pine straws and agro fleece around palms and construction. All without heat (so far so good).

Edited by Henoh

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Henoh

IMG_0765.jpg

IMG_0764.jpg

IMG_0767.jpg

IMG_0768.jpg

IMG_0769.jpg

IMG_0769.jpg

IMG_0771.jpg

IMG_0766.jpg

IMG_0775.jpgMy garden is at my weekend house (cca 20-30km east from Zagreb) so heating palms is not option for me.

Edited by Henoh
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Henoh

One more species declared as zone 8 that thrive in zone 7 if you keep palm dry is Chamaerops humilis var. argentea (or more popular but iregular name cerifera). Nannorrhops is more demanding but is not impossible task. Sabal etonia also.

IMG_0587.JPG

IMG_0732.JPG

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Henoh

Sabal etonia, five years from seed, three years outside

IMG_0675.JPG

Edited by Henoh
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Henoh

Another Chamaerops and Sabal 'Birmingham' which is very, verry rare in Europe.I got mine as one leafe seedling from MJPapay (North Carolina).

IMG_0722.JPG

IMG_0744.JPG

Edited by Henoh
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PalmTreeDude
On 12/3/2016, 10:40:04, Henoh said:

Sabal etonia, five years from seed, three years outside

IMG_0675.JPG

Looks nice!

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ChrisA
On ‎12‎/‎3‎/‎2016‎ ‎7‎:‎52‎:‎07‎, Henoh said:

Hi Chris, sorry I didn't see your message until now. Usually we have mostly dry and hot summers. Growing season starts from middle of March and prolongs to the middle of October, sometimes even to the early November. Winter minimums usually ranges from -18 to -12 (cca 10 F to 0F) Summer highs ranges from 30- 35, and sometimes up to 40 Celsius.In background is bamboo Paeudosasa japonica and on the right side is Diospyros kaki 'tipo'.

No worries Henoh! I've been away from the site for a while. It sounds like your climate is a lot like where I live although we don't normally get quite so cold in the winter normally. I've added some new palms this year and am looking forward to Albuquerque (on the west side of the city anyhow) has gotten down to 17 twice, and several lows in the low to mid 20's.  So far my palms seem to be fairing well. How is the winter coming along on your side of the pond?

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Henoh

Hi Chris, 

nothing serious so far.Low to 20F one morning, and two ice days with lots of fog.This is bad thing for Cacti, Agave and Yucca becouse of high humidite.

Few pictures from today

IMG_0963.JPG

IMG_0965.JPG

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Henoh

Chamaerops humilis var. argentea (cerifera)

IMG_0956.JPG

IMG_1032.JPG

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Henoh

South facing slope where is most of my palms and other exotics. On secod picture is Laurus nobolis and Yucca aloifolia.

IMG_0975.JPG

IMG_0989.JPG

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Henoh

Trachycarpus ukhrulensis, or manipur also zone 8 palm. This is first winter for that palm and I don't know what to expect.

Trachycarpus geminisectus should be zone 8 species. This is second winter for this little palm. I protected this one with pine straws. Not easy palm, one died this summer for not knowing reason.

 

IMG_0991.JPG

IMG_1010.JPG

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Henoh

Trachycarpus 'Nova' ( Im not shure what is this Trachy, new species or just ecotype of T. fortunei). 

Louqat, underneath is seedling of S. x brazoriensis

IMG_0992.JPG

IMG_0993.JPG

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Desert DAC
On 7/25/2016, 11:06:28, ChrisA said:

Since last winter was so nice (a little bit of frigid weather in late December) I decided to try a Butia capitata. We will see how this does. It is not in the best location (no ultra warm microclimate), but I will protect it with its own little greenhouse for the winter months. What do you guys think? Will it survive a very cold 8a winter-climate with long, hot, sun-drenched summers?

 

B_Capitata_7_25_16.JPG

That and your other palms are impressive - even if some don't make it, you'll help establish their limits better. Though I better get to trying some! 

El Paso has nice P. canariensis and P. dactylifera, but it's a much more potent urban heat island than anything ABQ has, plus much of EP is a steep thermal belt. They are 2 effective climate zones warmer than ABQ by my rough "1/2 USDA zone method", and 1 zone warmer than where I am. W. filifera are all fine there and here, though in our valley most are stunted, short palms.

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NorCalKing
1 hour ago, Desert DAC said:

That and your other palms are impressive - even if some don't make it, you'll help establish their limits better. Though I better get to trying some! 

El Paso has nice P. canariensis and P. dactylifera, but it's a much more potent urban heat island than anything ABQ has, plus much of EP is a steep thermal belt. They are 2 effective climate zones warmer than ABQ by my rough "1/2 USDA zone method", and 1 zone warmer than where I am. W. filifera are all fine there and here, though in our valley most are stunted, short palms.

Looking at El Paso, they've been as cold as -8f and have also seen low single digits many times. Wouldn't want to have anything close to tropical in the ground those years. Yikes!

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Desert DAC
2 minutes ago, NorCalKing said:

Looking at El Paso, they've been as cold as -8f and have also seen low single digits many times. Wouldn't want to have anything close to tropical in the ground those years. Yikes!

I hear you, but at 4000' elevation and 31.5N the sun is powerful, and winters are dry. Their 65+ consecutive hours <32F in 2/2011 didn't hurt the big, decades-old Phoenix palms. Though clouds kept up their low to 0F to +5F. Even some recent queen palms (!) thriving in central EP, the lowest this last 2 winters 25F there...but just wait a few winters.

I must make a list of various towns' plant successes in my region.

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jfrye01@live.com

Here is a palmetto growing at a church in Wichita, KS, zone 6b/7a

588ea79543c60_Palms8.30.16010.thumb.JPG.

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Jimhardy
On 12/11/2016, 11:54:49, Henoh said:

Trachycarpus 'Nova' ( Im not shure what is this Trachy, new species or just ecotype of T. fortunei). 

Louqat, underneath is seedling of S. x brazoriensis

IMG_0992.JPG

IMG_0993.JPG

 

 

Good looking palms,nice collection.

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PalmTreeDude
On 1/29/2017, 9:41:21, jfrye01@live.com said:

Here is a palmetto growing at a church in Wichita, KS, zone 6b/7a

588ea79543c60_Palms8.30.16010.thumb.JPG.

Woah! Do you know if it gets any damage in the winter? It looks so healthy!

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jfrye01@live.com
6 hours ago, PalmTreeDude said:

Woah! Do you know if it gets any damage in the winter? It looks so healthy!

It usually does, here is a picture I took last week...I hope it hangs around long enough to seed! IMG_2227.thumb.JPG.753bf4fe59d897455dd9e

Another angle: 

IMG_2334.JPG

Edited by jfrye01@live.com
New picture

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