Jump to content
Tracy

Pest on Encephalartos longifolius new flush

Recommended Posts

Tracy

I transplanted an Encephalartos longifolius from my old garden to the new house about 20 months ago.  It was getting too much shade after my neighbor decided to plant a hedge on the edge of his property, so had slowed even before I transplanted it.  This is the first flush of new leaves since the transplant, and I see these black bugs on it.  I blasted it with an insecticidal soap which lists that it kills mites, aphids, and a host of other things.  Hard to tell if its killing them and they are still just stuck on or what is going on, so I took this photo last night.  Anyone able to identify the little guys (sorry, I didn't get out a macro lens and light was a bit dark when I shot this).  I know once they harden off, I'm out of trouble, but worry the leaflets will be deformed if they are sucking them dry when they are still young, soft and pliant.

20160531-104A2217.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Pedro 65

I'd cut  "all" the infected leaves off and Burn them, you did'nt add a little too much Nitrogen in your fert mix  ?

Encephalartos  dont mind "all" leaves being cut off if infected , is your new position in a very well drained spot?

It'll bounce back if its in full sun and very well drained and "not" over ferted.

Good luck.

If you "do" cut all the leaves off , paint the ends with an anti fungas paint or the likes

Pete  :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tracy
4 minutes ago, Pedro 65 said:

I'd cut  "all" the infected leaves off and Burn them, you did'nt add a little too much Nitrogen in your fert mix  ?

Encephalartos  dont mind "all" leaves being cut off if infected , is your new position in a very well drained spot?

Hi Pete aka Pedro,  I think cutting off all the leaves with these little bugs is a little bit of overkill.  They don't get on the hardened off leaflets only the more tender new flush, which will rapidly grow out of this soft phase.  All my Encephalartos are in elevated positions so they get good drainage.  I have seen similar white aphids on soft new Encephalartos leaflets in past years, in particular when its humid and they grow out of it fine except for some slight deformation of the leaves.  I'm more curious if anyone recognizes them.  Relative to nitrogen, this one received proportionally the same dose as all my other Encephalartos cycads both in the ground and in containers, so its not a nutritional issue.  Whatever they are, they do seem to have a relationship with an ant colony nearby.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Pedro 65

Hi Tracy, its your call  whatever you do but, Id certainly cut off the infected leaved for starters.

Your bug look very much like Black scale which work harmoniously with ants by feeding them sweets and the problem will no doubt worsen if the scale isnt removed.

Scale of all sorts usually go for plants with a little sickness or a "tad" too much fert , usually N.

Anyway, all best with your Longifolius, which is a  beautiful Encephalartos, any chance of a pic of the  full plant?

 

Pete  :)

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tracy
14 minutes ago, Pedro 65 said:

all best with your Longifolius, which is a  beautiful Encephalartos, any chance of a pic of the  full plant?

The first one is the transplant, which has the black ? bugs.  The other one I planted about 6 years ago now, before I lived in this house.  It survived renters, irrigation failures, but it was never shaded like the first one was.  The first one was doomed in my other garden as soon as my neighbor put his hedge up, so I had to transplant it.  Both photos were a couple of months ago, pre-flush on either.  The bigger and more established one is going to flush anyday, as its the last of my Encephalartos this year to push a new flush and it has a clear little peak going in the middle.

If scale is the culprit, the insecticidal soap I sprayed it with should be killing them.  Normally I don't like to touch the leaves when they are soft like this, but when they get large enough, I can get my fingers on them and wipe them off.  The current flush had two phases, the first couple of leaves are further ahead of the rest of the flush, so I have physically removed them from those leaves.  Waiting for the others to open more and trusting the spray for now.  Thanks for the good wishes.

20160410-104A1447.jpg

20160408-104A1411.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tracy

Since I like E longifolius, one more photo to show some diversity in form.  This is another one I left behind in my rental, but am still tempted to transplant so I can enjoy it more.  I'll probably keep it where it is though.  The new greener leaves are from a flush just a few weeks before the shot was taken in May.

20160502-104A1498-2.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Pedro 65
32 minutes ago, Tracy said:

The first one is the transplant, which has the black ? bugs.  The other one I planted about 6 years ago now, before I lived in this house.  It survived renters, irrigation failures, but it was never shaded like the first one was.  The first one was doomed in my other garden as soon as my neighbor put his hedge up, so I had to transplant it.  Both photos were a couple of months ago, pre-flush on either.  The bigger and more established one is going to flush anyday, as its the last of my Encephalartos this year to push a new flush and it has a clear little peak going in the middle.

If scale is the culprit, the insecticidal soap I sprayed it with should be killing them.  Normally I don't like to touch the leaves when they are soft like this, but when they get large enough, I can get my fingers on them and wipe them off.  The current flush had two phases, the first couple of leaves are further ahead of the rest of the flush, so I have physically removed them from those leaves.  Waiting for the others to open more and trusting the spray for now.  Thanks for the good wishes.

20160410-104A1447.jpg

20160408-104A1411.jpg

A real Stunner, so no chance of pic of  the sick 1? which has green leaves in the 1st post.

Edit.. Sorry Tracy, just read yr 1st pic is old when it was flushing.

Sound harsh, but, Id cover the caudex with sand and burn the dead infected leaves while they are still on it rather than cut off.

E's are "Tough"

Thanks for the pics and bset of luck once again.

 

Pete :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
LJG

Aphids. This happens on new flushes. I spray with malathion in low dose after sun down. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tracy
20 minutes ago, LJG said:

Aphids. This happens on new flushes. I spray with malathion in low dose afterraun down.

I have had light infestations of the small white aphids on the tips of new flushes before, but this is a first for the black ones.  It is also more dense than on any other Encephalartos I've experienced the white ones on.  It seems that between the pressure of the spray bottle and the insecticidal soap, the issue is resolving quickly.  I've hit it twice now and will do it again later this afternoon or tomorrow.  I also shot a pm to George Sparkman, who I've acquired most of my Encephalartos from.  He reinforced that they can be washed off relatively easily, even with a hose nozzle.  Thanks for the id... when I looked up aphids, I saw a match for this variety among the various shades of green ones and white ones, which I have encountered in the past.  Happily none of these little buggers on any of the other cycad flushes happening in my garden.  I've always loved this particular longifolius, as it has the very recurved leaf tips.  I also hate to lose a flush to deformities, especially after its been so long acclimating to the new garden!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DoomsDave

I agree with Len, looks like aphids. Much easier to kill than scale.

And if the treatment's not successful, Encephalartos live for eternity. ("Remember how voracious those dinosaurs were?")

That is a pretty species! Have to get one, now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tracy
1 hour ago, DoomsDave said:

That is a pretty species! Have to get one, now.

Just remember to plant it where it will get some sun.... NO shade of doom for Encephalartos Dave!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DoomsDave
1 hour ago, Tracy said:

Just remember to plant it where it will get some sun.... NO shade of doom for Encephalartos Dave!

That's getting to be a tall order at the Death Camp.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
TexasColdHardyPalms

That second one is a stunner and would command a few pennies.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tracy
7 minutes ago, TexasColdHardyPalms said:

That second one is a stunner and would command a few pennies.

While its value to me is emotionally very high, I did notice that George Sparkman who is a member of this forum, has put E longifolius on his specials for the month of June at http://cycads-n-palms.com/

With the exception of a couple of my Encephalartos species, George has been my source for this genus over the years, and I have never been disappointed with a purchase from him!  If someone were thinking about getting a big one, now wouldn't be a bad time.  My biggest one was pretty good size in 2010 when planted, but has definitely gone to the next level!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kevin S

  Hit those bugs spray of some water from underneath should take care of them repeat as necessary.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tracy

I was getting close to giving up on this Encephalartos longifolius which I transplanted after I moved into my Leucadia home.  The last flush in 2016 was damaged as reported, and I waited until this Autumn for it to finally flush.  As you can tell by the color, the new flush still hasn't completely hardened off.  Hoping an incoming storm with rain, wind and potentially colder weather over the next few days doesn't do any damage to the flush before it gets hard.  I hope this starts catching up with my other E longifolius which have been good performers for me!

20160706-104A3905 Encephalartos longifolius.jpg

20181128-104A1725.jpg

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The Germinator
Tracy
10 hours ago, The Germinator said:

They literally blast all the critters of the plant with little or no damage to the plant.

 

Most people think of Encephalartos leaflets as being quite robust, thick and tough.  They are but with a hitch.  A new flush is soft and easily damaged from many things.  Ever had someone look at a flush and insist on touching the still soft leaves only to permanently damage a leaflet?  Well I have.  A high pressure blast on the tender new flush will definitely deform and or can even break off the leaflets.  So, the secret is to make sure their compatriots in crime (ants) are under control when you get a new flush.  I've carefully picked off aphids from flushing leaflets before they can multiply since this occurred, as well as using insecticidal soap.  Unfortunately an E princeps had a few on it which I treated with blasts from a spray bottle with insecticidal soap.  It permanently washed off some of the wax that gives it a blue tint, so even today you can see the spray marks on those leaflets.  I guess I would rather have stained leaves than damaged leaves.  That said, a "heavy" blast is not something I would do unless I exhausted all the other alternatives.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Palm Tree Jim
27 minutes ago, Tracy said:

Most people think of Encephalartos leaflets as being quite robust, thick and tough.  They are but with a hitch.  A new flush is soft and easily damaged from many things.  Ever had someone look at a flush and insist on touching the still soft leaves only to permanently damage a leaflet?  Well I have.  A high pressure blast on the tender new flush will definitely deform and or can even break off the leaflets.  So, the secret is to make sure their compatriots in crime (ants) are under control when you get a new flush.  I've carefully picked off aphids from flushing leaflets before they can multiply since this occurred, as well as using insecticidal soap.  Unfortunately an E princeps had a few on it which I treated with blasts from a spray bottle with insecticidal soap.  It permanently washed off some of the wax that gives it a blue tint, so even today you can see the spray marks on those leaflets.  I guess I would rather have stained leaves than damaged leaves.  That said, a "heavy" blast is not something I would do unless I exhausted all the other alternatives.

So true Tracy.

Unfortunately, I have had the same experience with a "cycad rookie" fondle the new flush. Never a good outcome.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tracy
20 minutes ago, Palm Tree Jim said:

Unfortunately, I have had the same experience with a "cycad rookie" fondle the new flush. Never a good outcome.

It's become the first thing I say when walking someone around the garden and we come across a flush:  "Don't touch as it will deform the soft forming leaflets".  The Encephalartos princeps that I sprayed with a detergent mixed with Neem Oil to eliminate some aphids is pictured below.  You can see how it washed off the white film that gives the leaves there blue color.  It turned the sprayed spots the same color as older flushes which have had the material washed off due to rain and time.  Fortunately this was two flushes back, so in time these leaves will be replaced with a newer flush!

20181231-104A2055.jpg

20181231-104A2053.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The Germinator

Here is a sample of the Bug blaster in action. I came back later and the ants were all over the place looking for their crop of scale. Great way to get rid of topical pests.

scale.jpg

wand.jpg

after.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tracy
7 hours ago, The Germinator said:

Here is a sample of the Bug blaster in action. I came back later and the ants were all over the place looking for their crop of scale. Great way to get rid of topical pests.

Thank you Ed.   I'm sure its quite effective and would work great on many things.  One of the best applications would be for white fly on hibiscus.  I have a similar nozzle I use for my hibiscus and occasionally for my palms.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tracy
On 11/28/2018 at 6:50 PM, Tracy said:

I was getting close to giving up on this Encephalartos longifolius which I transplanted after I moved into my Leucadia home.  The last flush in 2016 was damaged as reported, and I waited until this Autumn for it to finally flush.  As you can tell by the color, the new flush still hasn't completely hardened off.  Hoping an incoming storm with rain, wind and potentially colder weather over the next few days doesn't do any damage to the flush before it gets hard.  I hope this starts catching up with my other E longifolius which have been good performers for me!

20160706-104A3905 Encephalartos longifolius.jpg

20181128-104A1725.jpg

After a couple of year's this Encephalartos longifolius appears to finally be out of the woods.  Until I recently trimmed off leaves from the older flushes, there were still signs of the damage from those old flushes.  I'm hoping this will now be on a good track as my other 2 E longifolius always hold 2 to 3 healthy looking flushes.  With just a single flush, this one has the pineapple shape haircut.

20200927-BH3I1220.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Merlyn

Did you ever figure out what the black bugs were?  I found that killing off local ant nests with Ambdro Ant Block helped a lot with some of my scale and mealybug problems.  Those little @#!$*$* things were farming the mealybugs from plant to plant.  When I got rid of the ants, the scale was easy to kill off.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Similar Content

    • PalmatierMeg
      By PalmatierMeg
      Can anyone confirm the ID of the seeding Zamia in the photos below? Could it be Z. loddigesii x pumila? Something else?

    • Coasta
      By Coasta
      Hello All!!! 
      I know its early but I am prepping for next summer! I am in Mesa arizona, so it gets hot here.  Recently I have purchased some encephalartos cycads and a Dioon. I have all of them in pots and have zero shade in my yard. I am going to be building a 16×16 shade area next summer and I am wondering for encephalartos what would be your opinion on the best percentage? So far I have seen 50 percent, but wondering if anyone has had any luck with a lower percent. 
      As a side note, I am looking at aluminet shade cloth which acts as a mirror and reflects heat away from the shade structure. 
       
      Thanks for your time! 
    • Coasta
      By Coasta
      Hello all! Just wanted to get opinios on how fast it takes a cycad in the seedling stage to develop a caudex? 
      I know there are many types of cycads that grow and different rates. 
      My personal favorite cyads right now are encephalartos. 
      What is the typical rate from seedling to developing a small caudex for encephalartos? 
      Is it better to pay for something that has a caudex developed or stick with seedlings and watch them grow?
      Also what is the typical amount of time for germination?
×
×
  • Create New...