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DoomsDave

I recall a  thread we had a while back by one of our PTers who thought about Chinese elms.

Here in La Habra, our "urban foresters" have used them a lot and I wish they'd use palms instead.

Those pictured below are the most common street tree configuration. They rather remind me of aerially inclined snakes, coiling skyward.

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DoomsDave

But, Chinese Elms have their charms. The bark is pretty.

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DoomsDave

When they're not pruned like snakes, Chinese elms are much better looking. The Shoe is 12.5" (32 cm) long to give an idea of scale. They're big trees, but not monsters.

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DoomsDave

But, they can be magnificent,like this one. This is one tree, with a canopy about 80 feet across. That slender trunk makes it look like a green rain cloud.

549.thumb.JPG.2d1b6fc0561388aba5c4547031

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Josh-O

hat last piocture is very impressive!!!

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Pip

Chinese Elm has become a very commonly planted tree over here too. It is resistant to Dutch Elm disease also drought tolerant. My street has them, most of the residents pulled them out, only four remain. Mine was damaged by the home construction contractors, I replaced it with a Brachychiton disclor, Queensland Lace Bark. I'll enjoy a tree with interesting bark and blossoms. I also like the shape of the Brachychiton better than Ulnus parvifolia. 

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RedRabbit

Thanks for sharing DD! Those look a little different (better) than the ones we have here. They're a lot bigger and they seem to grow more upright than ours. Any idea how old the street trees are you posted?

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DoomsDave

Good question about the age of the street trees. I'd say at least 30 years, going by the width of the trunks.

Chinese elms have wood that is very tough, but also splinters easily in storms. It is the DEVIL on a chipper shredder; it's so hard it breaks blades and impellers on 10 HP shredders like mine. New logs are impossible to split with wedges.

Not sure how they'll handle our new drought is normal regime. We have Brachychitons, too, though the acerfolius is really not a good street tree.

Sometimes it's good to experiment, sometimes, not so much.

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RedRabbit
13 hours ago, DoomsDave said:

Good question about the age of the street trees. I'd say at least 30 years, going by the width of the trunks.

Chinese elms have wood that is very tough, but also splinters easily in storms. It is the DEVIL on a chipper shredder; it's so hard it breaks blades and impellers on 10 HP shredders like mine. New logs are impossible to split with wedges.

Not sure how they'll handle our new drought is normal regime. We have Brachychitons, too, though the acerfolius is really not a good street tree.

Sometimes it's good to experiment, sometimes, not so much.

Ahh ok, 30+ years makes sense then. 

Brachychitons are also good trees, I've been tempted to get one. :)

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Matthew92

Beautiful. Amazingly lush for such a dry area.

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DoomsDave
10 hours ago, RedRabbit said:

Ahh ok, 30+ years makes sense then. 

Brachychitons are also good trees, I've been tempted to get one. :)

DON'T get the Flame Tree, acerfolius. Unless you want an elephant in your narrow lot. Seriously.

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Howeadypsis

They're a great species for  bonsai

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