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Jan Jo

My garden in Cadiz, South of Spain

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Jan Jo
31 minutes ago, Astrophoenix said:

Fantastic garden, congrats. 

Thanks George! 

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Astrophoenix

 I sat in front of my notebook to work but instead I am lost looking at the photos! How much work did you put to create it and how much ongoing effort to keep it in this almost impeccable  condition Jan? Viva Espana!

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gilles06

Jan i would like to see your garden in 10 years, it takes a very good  way!

Dont't you have problem with picudo rojo?

1saludo

Edited by gilles06
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Jan Jo
On 8/12/2020 at 8:33 PM, Astrophoenix said:

 I sat in front of my notebook to work but instead I am lost looking at the photos! How much work did you put to create it and how much ongoing effort to keep it in this almost impeccable  condition Jan? Viva Espana!

Hi George,

Thanks for your comments, that´s a real compliment ;) 

Yes, it has involved a fair amount of work, many mistakes,  sometimes changing palms to another area if they´re not doing well... but it´s a lot of fun. I regret not bringing in more good soil when I started, there are areas of the garden where almost no palms will grow (layers of chalky soil, and pure clay underneath), but others which are better... the winters, I´m convinced, are milder than they used to be here, we haven´t had hard frosts for several years now (not wanting to jinx it). And then there´s the dry winds we get which come straight from North Africa, I´m guessing something like the Santa Ana winds in California. I think our climate here is much like that of Southern California, and I often use the Palms for California guide on Palmpedia as a reference for how things will do here...

What´s it like where you are in Greece? Similar?

In terms of design I´ve used lots of ideas from the amazing pictures I see of other Palmtalkers´ gardens. I kind of prefer the subtropical species, so living on the edge some of the time -  I´m less keen on the species which are better suited to our climate like Phoenix (although I have lots of Roebellini, and one Rupicola which all do well here)... also living on the edge with the Red Palm Weevil which has been on the rampage here for several years unfortunately... 

Can you send me a link to a topic or thread to see some pics of your palms?

Cheers,

Jan Jo

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Jan Jo
On 8/12/2020 at 8:43 PM, gilles06 said:

Jan i would like to see your garden in 10 years, it takes a very good  way!

Dont't you have problem with picudo rojo?

1saludo

Hi David,

Thanks! I try to imagine it, I look at pictures of some of the other Palmtalkers´ incredible gardens which I draw ideas from, who obviously started several years ago, with so many tall palms, and wonder if mine will reach that level...

I certainly have had problems with picudo rojo (Red Palm Weevil), it´s done so much damage to palms here in Spain, I guess also in your area on the French Riviera? Has it affected your palms? I´ve written about some of my skirmishes with the red palm weevil on here, in case you´re interested... ;)

 

Thanks,

Jan Jo

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gilles06

Thank you Jan,

Yes i have problem with insects like Rhynchophorus ferrugineus, but also with Paysandisia archon. I treat with insecticide once à month, but sometimes palms are attacked...

Ciao ;)

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Astrophoenix

Mi amigo, you have done an amazing job. Quite unsettling to know that this little piece of rojo sh@&#t  is such a problem there. In the last year, especially the last month I have got really alarmed as I have noticed 5 tall trachycarpus succumb  near my neighborhood in the last couple weeks. In my area most canary palms are dead, either from the last great freeze or the beetle, but i reckon half the tall trachycarpus are dead. I guess soon they will be all gone. Unfortunatelly I dont have a garden. Only a few palms in pots due to almost complete lack of space.  Crete is a great place for that kind of gardens as the absolute minimum there is just around  0 celcius in most areas. Buenas noches! 

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UK_Palms
On 8/13/2020 at 8:49 PM, Jan Jo said:

I certainly have had problems with picudo rojo (Red Palm Weevil), it´s done so much damage to palms here in Spain, I guess also in your area on the French Riviera? Has it affected your palms? I´ve written about some of my skirmishes with the red palm weevil on here, in case you´re interested... ;)

Hi, sorry to hear about your beetle woes. These pests are a nightmare. I am just waiting for them to start appearing in gardens around southern England now, as they spread further north each year. I know they have reached the west coast of France now and have become established in La Rochelle. I have also heard talk of them of it being present in the northeast of France around Brittany. In fact I thought I saw a RPW back in June flying around my garden, but I can't be sure. It was definitely a red beetle with black legs and it was going back and forth between my CIDP and a Butia. I turned the hosepipe on it to try and get rid of it as I couldn't get close enough to catch or kill it. It probably wasn't a RPW, but it has had me worried all summer now. I feel it is only a matter of time before the invasion arrives on our shores. That would be terrible news for the big CIDP's around London.

7 minutes ago, Astrophoenix said:

Mi amigo, you have done an amazing job. Quite unsettling to know that this little piece of rojo sh@&#t  is such a problem there. In the last year, especially the last month I have got really alarmed as I have noticed 5 tall trachycarpus succumb  near my neighborhood in the last couple weeks. In my area most canary palms are dead, either from the last great freeze or the beetle, but i reckon half the tall trachycarpus are dead. I guess soon they will be all gone. Unfortunatelly I dont have a garden. Only a few palms in pots due to almost complete lack of space.  Crete is a great place for that kind of gardens as the absolute minimum there is just around  0 celcius in most areas. Buenas noches! 

You say that the CIDP's were killed off in your last big freeze? Yet the Red Palm Weevil's are still there and have survived the freeze? That is very worrying if they survived the freeze as we do not even get cold enough to kill off the Canary Island Date Palms around London and the southeast of England. The Canary Island date palms survive just fine here and are really thriving in London and on the south coast. So if it was cold enough in northern Greece to kill CIDP's, but not the beetles, that means the beetle will survive winters here in the UK. Then again the lowest nighttime temperature in central London last winter was 1.5C (35F), meaning it was frost-free, which is obviously mild enough for larvae to survive through winter. I'm beginning to think southern England is a ticking time bomb for these beetles as well in the coming years. Either through infected palms that are imported or by them flying across the English channel from northern France. They may already be here.

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Astrophoenix

Hi UK Palms. I tend to agree with you and share your worries. A couple years ago we had around a week or more of very severe cold, the worse since 1953.Hard to imagine but my coastal area had 3 days and nights of max - 6c by noon and many agonizing mornings of - 9or 10, coupled with incessant fierce north winds. All Canary palms did not survive but suprisingly quite a few seedlings and youngsters survived.  The beetle is thriving though. Now I notice the windmill population declining noticably. My uneducated outlook? Maybe total anihilation of windmills. I guess very few palm owners know of the beetles existence. One that lost all four of his windmills, when asked by me if he had any idea why they died, said they must have died from underwatering. People dont know. It made me change my outlook and plans. I had plans of planting a couple of large windmills in my tiny yard, but quit that dream.Oh wrong place for the quoted text! 

On 8/18/2020 at 11:39 PM, UK_Palms said:

Hi, sorry to hear about your beetle woes. These pests are a nightmare. I am just waiting for them to start appearing in gardens around southern England now, as they spread further north each year. I know they have reached the west coast of France now and have become established in La Rochelle. I have also heard talk of them of it being present in the northeast of France around Brittany. In fact I thought I saw a RPW back in June flying around my garden, but I can't be sure. It was definitely a red beetle with black legs and it was going back and forth between my CIDP and a Butia. I turned the hosepipe on it to try and get rid of it as I couldn't get close enough to catch or kill it. It probably wasn't a RPW, but it has had me worried all summer now. I feel it is only a matter of time before the invasion arrives on our shores. That would be terrible news for the big CIDP's around London.

You say that the CIDP's were killed off in your last big freeze? Yet the Red Palm Weevil's are still there and have survived the freeze? That is very worrying if they survived the freeze as we do not even get cold enough to kill off the Canary Island Date Palms around London and the southeast of England. The Canary Island date palms survive just fine here and are really thriving in London and on the south coast. So if it was cold enough in northern Greece to kill CIDP's, but not the beetles, that means the beetle will survive winters here in the UK. Then again the lowest nighttime temperature in central London last winter was 1.5C (35F), meaning it was frost-free, which is obviously mild enough for larvae to survive through winter. I'm beginning to think southern England is a ticking time bomb for these beetles as well in the coming years. Either through infected palms that are imported or by them flying across the English channel from northern France. They may already be here.

 

Edited by Astrophoenix

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palmfriend

@Jan Jo

An absolute amazing garden with a beautiful collection! The growth rate of some of your palms is amazing -

especially the Bismarckias are rocking! Until now I have planted out just one but now I know I need to clear some

space around it. ;) 

Great pictures, please keep them coming!

All the best for you and your garden from Okinawa -

Lars

 

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Frond-friend42

Nice collection.  Thanks for sharing!

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UK_Palms
33 minutes ago, Astrophoenix said:

Hi UK Palms. I tend to agree with you and share your worries. A couple years ago we had around a week or more of very severe cold, the worse since 1953.Hard to imagine but my coastal area had 3 days and nights of max - 6c by noon and many agonizing mornings of - 9or 10, coupled with incessant fierce north winds. All Canary palms did not survive but suprisingly quite a few seedlings and youngsters survived.  The beetle is thriving though. Now I notice the windmill population declining noticably. My uneducated outlook? Maybe total anihilation of windmills. I guess very few palm owners know of the beetles existence. One that lost all four of his windmills, when asked by me if he had any idea why they died, said they must have died from underwatering. People dont know. It made me change my outlook and plans. I had plans of planting a couple of large windmills in my tiny yard, but quit that dream.Oh wrong place for the quoted text! 

 

-6C at noon!? :bemused: That is crazy. No wonder the CIDP's didn't survive. The coldest I have ever seen at noon here is around 0C during an exceptionally cold spell. My lowest maximum last winter was +4.1C though, although that was during one of the mildest winters of record. Certainly mild enough for RPW to survive, assuming it is even here yet.

You mention the weevil problem is rather bad where you are and that the big freeze only occurred a few years ago. So do you know whether the beetles survived these low temps in your area? Or were the beetles and larvae killed off during the severe cold, which would certainly be the case if there were little to no beetles later that summer? Or did the beetles get killed off by the freeze and then new ones quickly come back again, coming up from the south of Greece? I'm curious to know what the temperature threshold is for the RPW to survive.

I have also heard that Chamaerops and Washingtonia Filifera are resistant to the beetle, or have a far lower chance of attack? Have you noticed this in your area? If so, badly affected areas should maybe focus on planting various Chamaerops types and Filifera. I don't know whether this is something that is already being done around the Med?

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Jan Jo
On 8/18/2020 at 10:08 PM, Astrophoenix said:

Mi amigo, you have done an amazing job. Quite unsettling to know that this little piece of rojo sh@&#t  is such a problem there. In the last year, especially the last month I have got really alarmed as I have noticed 5 tall trachycarpus succumb  near my neighborhood in the last couple weeks. In my area most canary palms are dead, either from the last great freeze or the beetle, but i reckon half the tall trachycarpus are dead. I guess soon they will be all gone. Unfortunatelly I dont have a garden. Only a few palms in pots due to almost complete lack of space.  Crete is a great place for that kind of gardens as the absolute minimum there is just around  0 celcius in most areas. Buenas noches! 

Thanks again!! 

I didn't realise they went for Trachycarpus too, that's very sad... The Canary Island Date Palms here, which were everywhere, have been decimated... 

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Jan Jo
On 8/18/2020 at 10:39 PM, UK_Palms said:

Hi, sorry to hear about your beetle woes. These pests are a nightmare. I am just waiting for them to start appearing in gardens around southern England now, as they spread further north each year. I know they have reached the west coast of France now and have become established in La Rochelle. I have also heard talk of them of it being present in the northeast of France around Brittany. In fact I thought I saw a RPW back in June flying around my garden, but I can't be sure. It was definitely a red beetle with black legs and it was going back and forth between my CIDP and a Butia. I turned the hosepipe on it to try and get rid of it as I couldn't get close enough to catch or kill it. It probably wasn't a RPW, but it has had me worried all summer now. I feel it is only a matter of time before the invasion arrives on our shores. That would be terrible news for the big CIDP's around London.

You say that the CIDP's were killed off in your last big freeze? Yet the Red Palm Weevil's are still there and have survived the freeze? That is very worrying if they survived the freeze as we do not even get cold enough to kill off the Canary Island Date Palms around London and the southeast of England. The Canary Island date palms survive just fine here and are really thriving in London and on the south coast. So if it was cold enough in northern Greece to kill CIDP's, but not the beetles, that means the beetle will survive winters here in the UK. Then again the lowest nighttime temperature in central London last winter was 1.5C (35F), meaning it was frost-free, which is obviously mild enough for larvae to survive through winter. I'm beginning to think southern England is a ticking time bomb for these beetles as well in the coming years. Either through infected palms that are imported or by them flying across the English channel from northern France. They may already be here.

Thanks. I didn't know they had arrived in the UK yet.. Then again, as you said, what you saw might not have been one.. In my experience they're not all that difficult to swat/catch as long as they stay in the same area for a bit, often landing on the ground and they don't have very fast reflexes. They're kind of stupid that way, as if they weren't used to having predators of their own... 

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Jan Jo
12 hours ago, palmfriend said:

@Jan Jo

An absolute amazing garden with a beautiful collection! The growth rate of some of your palms is amazing -

especially the Bismarckias are rocking! Until now I have planted out just one but now I know I need to clear some

space around it. ;) 

Great pictures, please keep them coming!

All the best for you and your garden from Okinawa -

Lars

 

Thanks Lars! 

I've often enjoyed looking at pics of your garden too ;)

Yes, careful with the Bismarckias, they do need their room and are difficult to move if you realise you planted them in the wrong place, as I discovered once myself!

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lzorrito
10 hours ago, UK_Palms said:

I have also heard that Chamaerops and Washingtonia Filifera are resistant to the beetle, or have a far lower chance of attack? Have you noticed this in your area?

 @UK_Palms around here the weevil has already already attacked some fan palms. I've heard about Washingtonia being attacked, but isolated cases, probably some unhealthy vulnerable ones. A friend palm enthusiast nearby told me that his R. rivularis also also attacked, a total loss.

List of Palmae species susceptible to the Red beetle Rhynchophorus ferrugineus: Areca catechu; Howea forsteriana; Arecastrum romanzoffianum (Cham) Becc; Jubea chilensis; Arenga pinnata; Livistona australis; Borassus flabellifer; Livistona decipiens; Brahea armata; Metroxylon sagu; Butia capitata; Oreodoxa regia; Calamus merillii; Phoenix canariensis; Caryota maxima; Phoenix dactylifera; Caryota cumingii; Phoenix theophrasti; Chamaerops humillis; Phoenix sylvestris; Cocos nucifera; Sabal umbraculifera; Corypha gebanga; Trachycarpus fortunei; Corypha elata; Washingtonia spp.; Elaeis guineensis.

2 hours ago, Jan Jo said:

I didn't know they had arrived in the UK yet..

Me neither. You must take some measures, then. Pheromone traps are in use here along with phytosanitary treatments with combining chemicals and biological(nematodes).

@Jan Jo, how is it going there in Cadiz and Jerez de la Frontera? Is it decreasing with treatments? I know some CIDP successful heavy treatment cases in Ayamonte and Huelva.

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Jan Jo
8 hours ago, lzorrito said:

 @UK_PalmsPheromone traps are in use here along with phytosanitary treatments with combining chemicals and biological(nematodes).

@Jan Jo, how is it going there in Cadiz and Jerez de la Frontera? Is it decreasing with treatments? I know some CIDP successful heavy treatment cases in Ayamonte and Huelva.

I think there are fewer around than they used to be. Most surviving CIDPs belong to people who can afford the continuous expensive chemical treatments... Local government obviously uses them to protect existing large public CIDPs, but doesn't plant new ones... 

Meanwhile, the beast broadens its appetite and turns its attention to other less common palms (Pritchardia and Ravenea I can vouch for), though it seems to generally ignore Washingtonia Robusta (prefers Filifera) and Syagrus Rom. (both very common here).  

As far as the pheromone traps go, I've always thought they sounded like a good idea but I've never actually used them personally... Here, some garden centre owners I've spoken to say they'd rather not use them on the basis that they'd rather not attract the weevils in the first place, which may or may not go for the traps and may instead go for the very same palms nearby which the traps are meant to protect... Who knows? 

Edited by Jan Jo

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Astrophoenix
19 hours ago, UK_Palms said:

-6C at noon!? :bemused: That is crazy. No wonder the CIDP's didn't survive. The coldest I have ever seen at noon here is around 0C during an exceptionally cold spell. My lowest maximum last winter was +4.1C though, although that was during one of the mildest winters of record. Certainly mild enough for RPW to survive, assuming it is even here yet.

You mention the weevil problem is rather bad where you are and that the big freeze only occurred a few years ago. So do you know whether the beetles survived these low temps in your area? Or were the beetles and larvae killed off during the severe cold, which would certainly be the case if there were little to no beetles later that summer? Or did the beetles get killed off by the freeze and then new ones quickly come back again, coming up from the south of Greece? I'm curious to know what the temperature threshold is for the RPW to survive.

I have also heard that Chamaerops and Washingtonia Filifera are resistant to the beetle, or have a far lower chance of attack? Have you noticed this in your area? If so, badly affected areas should maybe focus on planting various Chamaerops types and Filifera. I don't know whether this is something that is already being done around the Med?

Yeah, crazy cold! Mi amigo, this happened around 18 months ago. In january 2019. A few months after the deep freeze, in the summer of 2019,say five months later, I noticed an adult weevil on my balcony.  I dont think it came from the south.? How can i ensure that my palms(hypothetical, I want to plant a couple large trachycarpus if i can offer them sufficient protection) dont get infected and killed from the beetle. Is this feasible? 

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Jan Jo
5 hours ago, Astrophoenix said:

Yeah, crazy cold! Mi amigo, this happened around 18 months ago. In january 2019. A few months after the deep freeze, in the summer of 2019,say five months later, I noticed an adult weevil on my balcony.  I dont think it came from the south.? How can i ensure that my palms(hypothetical, I want to plant a couple large trachycarpus if i can offer them sufficient protection) dont get infected and killed from the beetle. Is this feasible? 

Hi George, I wouldn't get too obsessed about the weevil, if you like a palm and it does well in your area, plant it. I would use one of the recommended insecticides in the warm months, try not to prune during those warm months because that attracts the RPW (and if you do, apply the insecticide on the parts where you prune), keep an eye on it and hope for the best.. I know Trachycarpus are on the weevil's menu, but I lost a Ravenea and a Pritchardia and I would (and did) still plant those species (genera) again...

We can't live in fear of it ;)

Edited by Jan Jo

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UK_Palms
11 hours ago, Jan Jo said:

Thanks. I didn't know they had arrived in the UK yet.. Then again, as you said, what you saw might not have been one.. In my experience they're not all that difficult to swat/catch as long as they stay in the same area for a bit, often landing on the ground and they don't have very fast reflexes. They're kind of stupid that way, as if they weren't used to having predators of their own... 

So the RPW is not officially in the UK yet. However, we have had a handful of cases in the UK where imported palms coming from Spain and Italy have been carrying the beetle. So they have definitely reached these shores, and have been found in the UK, leading to tighter restrictions and regulations on palm imports to prevent the spread of this weevil. 

However, I cannot rule out the possibility of infected palms still being placed in UK gardens, or rogue beetles flying across the English channel, from France, into southern England. So the threat of a weevil invasion remains very real. Especially since the south coast and central London did not drop below freezing last winter. Definitely warm enough for their survival here. I think it is more than likely that there are RPW colonies in the UK somewhere already, either around London or on the south coast. 

The beetle I saw was probably not a RPW, and rather a stag beetle of some kind, although I cannot be sure. It could have been a RPW for all I know. It certainly looked like one. Over the past 2-3 years, I have seen a number of new insects here, which were not here a few years ago - oak processionally moths, Asian giant hornets, Harlequin ladybirds, Argentine ants etc. Lots of sub-tropical species adapting easily to our climate and becoming a problem. I don't see why the RPW will find it a problem here with mild winters and warm, dry summers in the southeast of England. I think UK palm growers need to be on the look out, and ready, for the arrival of this pest...

 

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UK_Palms
14 hours ago, lzorrito said:

 @UK_Palms around here the weevil has already already attacked some fan palms. I've heard about Washingtonia being attacked, but isolated cases, probably some unhealthy vulnerable ones. A friend palm enthusiast nearby told me that his R. rivularis also also attacked, a total loss.

List of Palmae species susceptible to the Red beetle Rhynchophorus ferrugineus: Areca catechu; Howea forsteriana; Arecastrum romanzoffianum (Cham) Becc; Jubea chilensis; Arenga pinnata; Livistona australis; Borassus flabellifer; Livistona decipiens; Brahea armata; Metroxylon sagu; Butia capitata; Oreodoxa regia; Calamus merillii; Phoenix canariensis; Caryota maxima; Phoenix dactylifera; Caryota cumingii; Phoenix theophrasti; Chamaerops humillis; Phoenix sylvestris; Cocos nucifera; Sabal umbraculifera; Corypha gebanga; Trachycarpus fortunei; Corypha elata; Washingtonia spp.; Elaeis guineensis.

Me neither. You must take some measures, then. Pheromone traps are in use here along with phytosanitary treatments with combining chemicals and biological(nematodes).

That is very disconcerting as I had heard that the Washingtonia Filifera is resistant to RPW attacks, although you suggest otherwise. Unless it is Robusta being attacked (which may not have the same resistance) unlike Filifera? Can you confirm this? Was it Robusta that was attacked, or Filibusta, or a Filifera? It obviously helps to know...

Something has definitely been affecting my Phoenix Dactylifera in recent weeks. I don't know what, but the trunk is looking a bit dodgy and weak. It sailed through winter and spring here, but is looking a bit odd now going into August. We have had a pretty dry year as well (8 inches of rain to date) and it has been fairly warm this summer. No reason for the Dacty to look the way it is. I will investigate it tomorrow, checking the trunk, in case there is a weevil attack. I am certainly on edge over this now, compared to recent years. Especially after seeing that red beetle earlier on in summer (although I doubt it was RPW). 

I doubt I will try Pheromone traps unless the RPW becomes a genuine issue here in the south of England, although it may already be present here now. It could have already established in the south coast and London regions over the past year or two. In which case we could be looking at a full scale invasion in coming years, given the amount of palm plantings. I guess time will tell. There are more palms being planted now than ever, and bigger palms every year here, so if it does become an issue in the south of England, the RPW will have a field day here... :bummed:

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UK_Palms
5 hours ago, Astrophoenix said:

Yeah, crazy cold! Mi amigo, this happened around 18 months ago. In january 2019. A few months after the deep freeze, in the summer of 2019,say five months later, I noticed an adult weevil on my balcony.  I dont think it came from the south.? How can i ensure that my palms(hypothetical, I want to plant a couple large trachycarpus if i can offer them sufficient protection) dont get infected and killed from the beetle. Is this feasible? 

Very, very worrying. Your comments suggests to me that the RPW will have no issues in the south of England should it become established here. Recent winters are certainly mild enough for it to survive and recent summers are certainly warm enough for it to breed profusely. If it gets established here, it will almost certainly survive in London and the south coast. Then it will affect the whole southeast region during the summer months. So alarm bells are certainly ringing here from me. 

I would maybe suggest you use the pheromone traps to catch as many beetles as possible in your yard, in order to prevent them going onto your palms. Although that could also draw even more beetles to your garden, so it is a catch 22. Do you know whether Trachycarpus is less susceptible to attacks than say Phoenix Canariensis or Dactylifera? Maybe you will be much better off planting Trachy's than other types of palms? If they are attacked less? And then try to keep an eye out for beetles on a weekly basis, treating palms with disinfectant and applying treatments as soon as you see an attack??

Other people in affected areas will be able to advise you much better than I can pal...

All the best.

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lzorrito
UK_Palms
3 hours ago, lzorrito said:

So Washingtonia Filifera definitely seems to have resistance against the RPW then and we might be able to use it's extracts to combat the weevil. I'm guessing the jury is still out on how resistant Chamaerops Humilis is to this pest, but it certainly seems like it may also have at least some resistance to attacks.

Back in May of this year, a family on the south coast of England found a RPW in a packet of supermarket Broccoli. The broccoli was supposedly imported from Spain (according to Tesco), however government officials claim it was produced and packaged in the UK. Either way the beetle, and many more, are clearly here in the UK now via plant and palm imports. I wouldn't be surprised if there are already a few infestations quietly taking place in London or on the south coast, where they have not seen a frost for over 2 years now.

In this particular case, the broccoli and the weevil were left in the family's fridge for weeks, enduring temperatures of 5C consistently for 15 days. Yet the weevil was still alive and moving around when the family took the bag out of the fridge to throw away, thus discovering it. So it can clearly survive low temperatures and remain active, providing it doesn't freeze. Government officials collected it and determined it to be a female carrying eggs.

0_broccolitwo.jpg.d770fc6cad47dc01b32dc702d4bbed8d.jpg

 

And this is the specimen they found in Essex, just to the east of London, back in 2016. Also a female, which had already laid eggs on the infested palm it came off...

download-20161115121934820.jpg.410271692128bcc89379a3080d34f314.jpg

 

If the beetle reaches Tresco and Cornwall, it would be devastating for the palms there. We could lose the biggest CIDP's in northern Europe here at 50N, and also the biggest CIDP's in the world above 44N. The RPW would have no problem at all surviving in Tresco, since it has the mildest winters in Britain, plus the beetle will have an abundance of large palms to feast on. Especially the big CIDP's. Very worrying times ahead... :bummed:

513930012_TrescoCIPD1.jpg.33a46922ebe7f69d3c34836aa88a9661.jpg

tresco-abbey-gardens.thumb.jpg.29afec012279ffb715a9cfdf533c6ec2.jpg

Horn_TAG_161.thumb.jpg.8e6891f185935f1d3b1de9f320ba4c56.jpg

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The largest CIDP is 60 feet tall (18 meters) so it would be devastating to see the RPW arrive and wipe out the CIDP's on Tresco, or those in southern England in general. There are also Trachy's everywhere, on almost every street in southern England, which will also be targeted by the weevil. As of right now, the RPW is established at 46-47N on the west coast of France. 4 years ago it was confined to the French Med at 43N, but it has clearly moved further north each year. It could be as high as 51N now in southern England, if London does have isolated infections that are going unnoticed at this stage. I guess we'll find out in the coming months/years...

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Jan Jo
On 8/22/2020 at 12:37 PM, lzorrito said:

Thanks! Interesting articles. I'd heard local reports that Washingtonia Filifera were more prone to attack, glad to hear that's not the case..  Sounds like Filiferol may be the way forward then! 

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Jan Jo
On 8/22/2020 at 5:30 PM, UK_Palms said:

So Washingtonia Filifera definitely seems to have resistance against the RPW then and we might be able to use it's extracts to combat the weevil. I'm guessing the jury is still out on how resistant Chamaerops Humilis is to this pest, but it certainly seems like it may also have at least some resistance to attacks.

Back in May of this year, a family on the south coast of England found a RPW in a packet of supermarket Broccoli. The broccoli was supposedly imported from Spain (according to Tesco), however government officials claim it was produced and packaged in the UK. Either way the beetle, and many more, are clearly here in the UK now via plant and palm imports. I wouldn't be surprised if there are already a few infestations quietly taking place in London or on the south coast, where they have not seen a frost for over 2 years now.

In this particular case, the broccoli and the weevil were left in the family's fridge for weeks, enduring temperatures of 5C consistently for 15 days. Yet the weevil was still alive and moving around when the family took the bag out of the fridge to throw away, thus discovering it. So it can clearly survive low temperatures and remain active, providing it doesn't freeze. Government officials collected it and determined it to be a female carrying eggs.

0_broccolitwo.jpg.d770fc6cad47dc01b32dc702d4bbed8d.jpg

 

And this is the specimen they found in Essex, just to the east of London, back in 2016. Also a female, which had already laid eggs on the infested palm it came off...

download-20161115121934820.jpg.410271692128bcc89379a3080d34f314.jpg

 

If the beetle reaches Tresco and Cornwall, it would be devastating for the palms there. We could lose the biggest CIDP's in northern Europe here at 50N, and also the biggest CIDP's in the world above 44N. The RPW would have no problem at all surviving in Tresco, since it has the mildest winters in Britain, plus the beetle will have an abundance of large palms to feast on. Especially the big CIDP's. Very worrying times ahead... :bummed:

513930012_TrescoCIPD1.jpg.33a46922ebe7f69d3c34836aa88a9661.jpg

tresco-abbey-gardens.thumb.jpg.29afec012279ffb715a9cfdf533c6ec2.jpg

Horn_TAG_161.thumb.jpg.8e6891f185935f1d3b1de9f320ba4c56.jpg

3919555950_655ff0baa1_z.jpg.e3783b36830d1fb0648c5810bc324cb2.jpg

The largest CIDP is 60 feet tall (18 meters) so it would be devastating to see the RPW arrive and wipe out the CIDP's on Tresco, or those in southern England in general. There are also Trachy's everywhere, on almost every street in southern England, which will also be targeted by the weevil. As of right now, the RPW is established at 46-47N on the west coast of France. 4 years ago it was confined to the French Med at 43N, but it has clearly moved further north each year. It could be as high as 51N now in southern England, if London does have isolated infections that are going unnoticed at this stage. I guess we'll find out in the coming months/years...

RPW in the broccoli? Ayayay! 

As you say, let's pray they don't break out in Southern England, keep us updated... 

 

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lzorrito
1 hour ago, Jan Jo said:

Thanks! Interesting articles. I'd heard local reports that Washingtonia Filifera were more prone to attack, glad to hear that's not the case..  Sounds like Filiferol may be the way forward then! 

On 8/22/2020 at 4:30 PM, UK_Palms said:

So Washingtonia Filifera definitely seems to have resistance against the RPW then and we might be able to use it's extracts to combat the weevil. I'm guessing the jury is still out on how resistant Chamaerops Humilis is to this pest, but it certainly seems like it may also have at least some resistance to attacks.

:greenthumb:We must keep updated and share all the information gathered...I´m really sick of seeing CIDP, and others being wiped out by RPW!

On 8/22/2020 at 4:30 PM, UK_Palms said:

a family on the south coast of England found a RPW in a packet of supermarket Broccoli.

1 hour ago, Jan Jo said:

RPW in the broccoli? Ayayay! 

There's something really, really strange...it seems like an X-Files case! I'm speechless with it...:blink:

 

Edited by lzorrito
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