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RobustaEnvirons

Washingtonia Robusta in pot- Tips/Tap Root, Watering

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RobustaEnvirons

Hello everyone! Its been a little while since I've been on PT. I've got a few questions about Tap Roots and watering my Washingtonia Robusta "Seedling". Not sure if you'd still call it a Seedling though. Haha. 

I've kept my small little W.Robusta in my West/South-West facing bay window for many months now (since August 2015). Its done quite well, and has not complained. Its thrived this winter even with our often times limited sunlight duration (NW Ohio). Since August its put out 2 large leaves, and another has begun in the center. After arriving here from Nevada I potted it in a Powerade bottle. And there its been since. Its been doing phenomenal in my book. I wouldn't have guessed it would thrive so well. I just leave it alone and it grows well. I'm really very proud of it. 

I've been told by Pando to use a smaller pot in a previous post, so I've kept with the Powerade bottle container its in. Its not seemed to mind thus far. I've been watering it in cycles every now and again, when the top 2 inches of soil become dried out or its soil in general looks dried out. Back in the Winter, I tend to water it a little more since we had the furnace up a little more. Our home stays around 73F-76F all year-round (either with the furnace or AC). 

http://www.palmtalk.org/forum/index.php?/topic/47697-washingtonia-robusta/#comment-732014

Lately, I've noticed my little Washy has generated a long root that's grown straight to the bottle of the container. I've observed it everyday and this root is now (and has been) growing rapidly around the bottom diameter of the container. It appears to just be following the contour of the bottom of the container. I'm sure this is what some have referred to as the long "Tap Root" that Robusta send down to search for a water source. I've tried to avoid over-watering, so I only water it when its really dried out (I observe the bottom of the containers soil also since its transparent). 

Would it be a good idea to place a drainage tray underneath the container and fill the tray with water? Do potted W. Robusta prefer watering from a tray or from pouring water down into the soil from the top like I've been doing? I'm of the opinion that they don't prefer this but I figured I'd throw it out there. 

My thinking is that the root would then have an abundant water source that it could draw water from at any time. But, it'd be sitting in it all the time. My worries are that it might trigger the tap root to grow through one of the 6 drainage holes on the container's bottom. I don't want that to happen. Or, it could cause the dreaded Root-Rot I worry about. Also, I know that W. Robusta are a dessert palm and do not require a lot of water. So I'm kind of thinking that whole idea would be unnecessary and I shouldn't try it. 

Since around February/March my Washy has pushed up its center-newest leaf, and then has since not shown any further leave development. Its leaves are very lush and green, its just not growing its leaves out any longer than they've been. With Spring now upon us here in NW Ohio, we've been getting many many days of Sunshine and all-day sun at that! I even put it out in my warm Sunroom to gather a lot of sunlight there (after the sun moves more to the West after 5pm). I'm thinking all its energy has been going to growing that Tap Root since everyday I see its root has grown longer. The roots been growing at a decent speed too (maybe 1/4 an inch a day). I don't think it needs more water since I can see the soils still moist. But, you never know. Lol. 

Whats everyone's take on this? As always I appreciate all the advice and input I can get. PT is always helpful. :D       

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Edited by RobustaEnvirons

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RobustaEnvirons

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Brad Mondel

It looks like they're doing very well. Keep up the good work. 

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RobustaEnvirons
52 minutes ago, Brad Mondel said:

It looks like they're doing very well. Keep up the good work. 

Thank you. I agree, it's doing really well. I love it. 

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PalmatierMeg

At some point it will need repotting as the container will fill with roots. You should be able to let it go outdoors soon, at least by the time nights are above freezing. It will grow even faster when it gets full sun, heat and rain. This is a palm that really wants to live outside as long as possible. BTW, palms don't grow tap roots, even though many people use the term over & over. Tap roots are structures grown by dicot trees. Germinating palms put out a long radicle from which first roots originate. Later on, roots emerge from a "basal plate" at the bottom of the stem/trunk.

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RobustaEnvirons
1 hour ago, PalmatierMeg said:

At some point it will need repotting as the container will fill with roots. You should be able to let it go outdoors soon, at least by the time nights are above freezing. It will grow even faster when it gets full sun, heat and rain. This is a palm that really wants to live outside as long as possible. BTW, palms don't grow tap roots, even though many people use the term over & over. Tap roots are structures grown by dicot trees. Germinating palms put out a long radicle from which first roots originate. Later on, roots emerge from a "basal plate" at the bottom of the stem/trunk.

How will I know when I have to run out and buy a bigger pot for it? What size? Pando had his in (what looked like) containers that were only slightly larger than the one I had mine in now. His were much larger and developed at that. That's one thing i've been clueless as to. How can I know? With my large Robusta I made the mistake of using too large a pot, and it struggled. 

I understand what your saying Meg. I would like to put it outside but I really worry about bugs infesting the soil, such as ants/beatles/etc. I also worry about it being bothered by someone or something (like when mowing the lawn or something). I could see my uncle or grandma knocking it over or destroying it (probably on accident).

I actually really don't have anyplace to put it outside, I don't have a concrete patio or deck or anything. I had thought of buying a bench or something and placing it outside up against our house (West/Southwest facing), and then placing my palms on top of the bench. 

But, it all comes back to the bugs and stuff. I don't need any of that being brought back into the house in the fall. My grandma would just straight out make me get rid of all my palms. She doesn't like bugs in her house, she's forewarned me. Lol. The troubles of having to live with family I guess. 

I have been putting it outside on really sunny days on occasion, but I've always have been bringing it back inside once they sun sets. Its still getting chilly here unfortunately. Next week there's a couple days it will only top out in the mid 50's. One day I think it's supposed to only reach 52F as a high. Yikes!

Edited by RobustaEnvirons

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Pando
23 minutes ago, RobustaEnvirons said:

Pando had his in (what looked like) containers that were only slightly larger than the one I had mine in now. His were much larger and developed at that.

Not me, it was probably someone else, as I've never grown washies in a container. I'm pulling out seedlings from my front yard instead...  :D

Good work Richard, are some of them from the seeds I sent you? Did any other seeds germinate as well?

Edited by Pando
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PalmatierMeg

You seem to have a phobia about bugs, but truth is houseplants that never experience a whiff of fresh air get bugs - scale, mealybugs, ants (ants come indoors too), fungus gnats,  spider mites, on and on. Keeping a plant indoors doesn't mean you won't get creepy-crawlies. If bugs disturb you that much, you should consider silk plants. One reason I don't keep houseplants, aside from my climate, is that I don't want to have to battle plant pests indoors. All your other excuses are just that. If someone knocks over a pot outdoors, pick it up. Better dirt on the ground than all over the white carpet.

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RobustaEnvirons
4 hours ago, Pando said:

Not me, it was probably someone else, as I've never grown washies in a container. I'm pulling out seedlings from my front yard instead...  :D

Good work Richard, are some of them from the seeds I sent you? Did any other seeds germinate as well?

Oh, lol. Haha, sorry. I think you're right. I was thinking of somebody else. I'm trying to think of the person on here. I remember he's from Germany and from what I've gathered he's pretty much a master of growing palms indoors and in containers.  I'll try to remember. 

And thank you Pando! Yes, all of the seedlings shown in my photo here are from what you have me! I've had zero losses so far, 100% success rate from your seeds! :D

I have grown the 4 Washingtonia Robusta seeds shown here. I'm growing them for family members. They are interested in them. They all have nice Southfacing Windows (and yards) to put them in. One person, my aunt has 20+ foot ceilings, so if I can teach her how to maintain it, it should last a while in her home. I've had a great time growing these. I've enjoyed watching them grow through there lifecycle so far, I observe and look at them daily. I care for them with water, and additional soil (when needed). 

Once I free up some space on my bay window, I plan to try out some of the other seeds you sent me. I love many palms, but I'm limited in my grow space (here at my Grandma's house). Once I give my family members these Robusta seedlings, I'll just have my one larger Robusta left. Then, I will probably try to germinate another Robusta seed (just for me to have) as a backup, and since I love them. Lol. 

Edited by RobustaEnvirons

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RobustaEnvirons
28 minutes ago, PalmatierMeg said:

You seem to have a phobia about bugs, but truth is houseplants that never experience a whiff of fresh air get bugs - scale, mealybugs, ants (ants come indoors too), fungus gnats,  spider mites, on and on. Keeping a plant indoors doesn't mean you won't get creepy-crawlies. If bugs disturb you that much, you should consider silk plants. One reason I don't keep houseplants, aside from my climate, is that I don't want to have to battle plant pests indoors. All your other excuses are just that. If someone knocks over a pot outdoors, pick it up. Better dirt on the ground than all over the white carpet.

Well, so far actually we've only seen a couple of bugs indoors. I did have a gnat problem back in the fall (around the bay window), we kept spraying and they stopped. I also saw one ant, and a yellow lady bug thing. But, overall that's been it. They've been very clean. We do spray seasonally. It's not so much me, it's my family I live with. I live at my Grandma's house with my grandma, and uncle. 

But, I hear what your saying. I understand. I'm going to try to figure something out to keep them outside. 

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RobustaEnvirons
5 hours ago, Pando said:

Not me, it was probably someone else, as I've never grown washies in a container. I'm pulling out seedlings from my front yard instead...  :D

Good work Richard, are some of them from the seeds I sent you? Did any other seeds germinate as well?

AAH! I found out who I meant to say! I meant to say it was Pal Meir that had his Washingtonia Robusta in a container around the same size as my container. Lol, sorry about that. He said his were 2.5 years old and looks to have them in a pot about the same size, he said they were 12cm containers. http://www.palmtalk.org/forum/index.php?/topic/48483-helpadvice-on-repotting-my-wrobusta/

56aa8a2d00ecf_Washingtonia1984-01-08.thu

Edited by RobustaEnvirons
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RobustaEnvirons
On 4/25/2016, 2:14:38, PalmatierMeg said:

At some point it will need repotting as the container will fill with roots. You should be able to let it go outdoors soon, at least by the time nights are above freezing. It will grow even faster when it gets full sun, heat and rain. This is a palm that really wants to live outside as long as possible. BTW, palms don't grow tap roots, even though many people use the term over & over. Tap roots are structures grown by dicot trees. Germinating palms put out a long radicle from which first roots originate. Later on, roots emerge from a "basal plate" at the bottom of the stem/trunk.

Lately, I've noticed that the leaves aren't really doing too much. They're all still a vibrant green, but the leaves never seem to grow much these days. The center newest leaf is still just as long now as it was 2-3 months ago. 

I have noticed that all the growth has seemed to be redirected to the roots. They're growing pretty steady, especially that long radical at the bottom. It's all still green and healthy, just doesn't seem to be growing much above the soil these days. New offshoot roots have also grown (as shown in the pictures). I tend to agree, that sooner or later I will need to re-pot it. 

So is this an indication that I need to repot it then? If so, what size pot should I get? I'm sorta confused on pot sizes and how to know what size is right to get for it. What's weird is that I never would have imagined that it might be time already to re-pot it, Pal Meir's appears to have been quite a bit larger, and in a pot similar size. 

But, I'm not opposed to repotting it if that's what's best for it. 

Edited by RobustaEnvirons

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Patrick Palms

My washingtonua robusta survived winter ok.  Covered, with fleece.   Buf now yelliwing and going brown in one case.  What can i do to help these, palms ?? 

20160528_185124.jpg

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RobustaEnvirons
2 hours ago, Patrick Palms said:

My washingtonua robusta survived winter ok.  Covered, with fleece.   Buf now yelliwing and going brown in one case.  What can i do to help these, palms ?? 

20160528_185124.jpg

I'm not sure exactly what it is. If the center sphere remains green after all the the foliage dies, they could survive. That center sphere is all that really matters in the end. It could be an adjustment to light, could be root rot, could be fungas, or something else. I don't know. 

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PalmatierMeg

Do you fertilize them? Your potting mix looks dense and mucky. Do pots drain well?

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Patrick Palms

I. Did use cactus soil mix with local ground covering soil on top.  

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Pal Meir

This thread is a total riddle to me. :blink: I can’t understand that Washies make any trouble. :huh: They were the most easiest to germinate palms to me. :greenthumb::D The only problem was that they were growing too fast. :wacko: That was one reason why I kept them in small 12x12cm pots as long as possible. And they accepted even my worst soil mixes, the old used remainder of other palms’ soil … :evil:

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Howeadypsis

Interesting.  I thought it was a bad idea to use clear containers as it harms the roots?

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RobustaEnvirons
4 minutes ago, Howeadypsis said:

Interesting.  I thought it was a bad idea to use clear containers as it harms the roots?

So far my Washies have not had any problems. My one Washy has been thriving for over a year now (it was plucked from a backyard already established) since I bought it on eBay from some guy in Nevada. I've always used clear Powerade bottles since they're cheap, a decent size, and you can watch the soil. 

Edited by RobustaEnvirons

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Howeadypsis
25 minutes ago, RobustaEnvirons said:

So far my Washies have not had any problems. My one Washy has been thriving for over a year now (it was plucked from a backyard already established) since I bought it on eBay from some guy in Nevada. I've always used clear Powerade bottles since they're cheap, a decent size, and you can watch the soil. 

Sounds good to me. And for other plants too?

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Pal Meir

I’ve found some old pics from 1972 and 1974, taken in Hamburg. The first photo was taken on 1972-11-09 and shows a Washingtonia which germinated on 1972-02-26, the second photo was taken in summer 1974 (I guess in July), showing the same Washingtonia, now nearly 2½ year old. As the growth was too fast I didn’t repot my later Washies in so big pots, but waited with repotting as long as possible.

57585548c6a90_Washingtonia72N11-0401.thu

5758554dc2dcd_Washingtonia74N07-0305.thu

 

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Pal Meir

What I forgot to add is: I put them in direct sun (as much as possible in N Germany) and watered them regularly: SUN & WATER. But when they were still small I gave them almost no fert. :greenthumb::)

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Patrick Palms

Could cold wind cause leafs, yellowing. 

 

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RobustaEnvirons
49 minutes ago, Patrick Palms said:

Could cold wind cause leafs, yellowing. 

 

I would imagine that it could. When people unwrap there palms for the season, they often find the leaves with burnt tips or entire fronds burnt. But, assuming the center sphere is still green, the palm should regenerate many fronds by seasons end. That's if it's that issue thats causing it. 

Edited by RobustaEnvirons

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RobustaEnvirons
9 hours ago, Pal Meir said:

What I forgot to add is: I put them in direct sun (as much as possible in N Germany) and watered them regularly: SUN & WATER. But when they were still small I gave them almost no fert. :greenthumb::)

Did you have an apartment, and keep your palms out on a balcony?

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Pal Meir
4 hours ago, RobustaEnvirons said:

Did you have an apartment, and keep your palms out on a balcony?

Yes, I lived near to the city centre. And I kept the Washies all the year as long as possible on the balcony.

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Patrick Palms
21 hours ago, Pal Meir said:

This thread is a total riddle to me. :blink: I can’t understand that Washies make any trouble. :huh: They were the most easiest to germinate palms to me. :greenthumb::D The only problem was that they were growing too fast. :wacko: That was one reason why I kept them in small 12x12cm pots as long as possible. And they accepted even my worst soil mixes, the old used remainder of other palms’ soil … :evil:

Which country you live in ??  Yes, i know washies, are, tough but english winters with wind chill can kill them.  I have to keep them outside for now in pots.  Maybe its nust transportation shock combined with cold wind at times.  But i am hopeful most will be ok.  The one very brown was, knocked down by the wind.  Although covered ,  much soil came out of its, pot.  So i do fear that ,  that one is a gonner.  

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Pal Meir
29 minutes ago, Patrick Palms said:

Which country you live in ??  Yes, i know washies, are, tough but english winters with wind chill can kill them.  I have to keep them outside for now in pots.  Maybe its nust transportation shock combined with cold wind at times.  But i am hopeful most will be ok.  The one very brown was, knocked down by the wind.  Although covered ,  much soil came out of its, pot.  So i do fear that ,  that one is a gonner.  

You can’t keep them in such small pots at temps below 0°C for a longer time outdoors. They will either dry out or get frozen or both.

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Patrick Palms

I think i will plant them in the ground.  Do you guys use perlite mixed with peat moss?  And at bottom of hole dug,  place some small stones

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RobustaEnvirons
On 6/8/2016, 11:20:41, Howeadypsis said:

Interesting.  I thought it was a bad idea to use clear containers as it harms the roots?

So actually, as of the last week or so my Washies haven't been doing the best. I've noticed that tips of all the leaves are browning. My larger Robusta has almost lost its oldest leaf and its newest sphere has a brown tip also! I've been providing them plenty of consistant water, and they've been placed outside now that its summer. 

After some investigating I kind of suspect that this could be due to the clear containers. I'd actually never thought that clear containers could harm them, but they apparently can. 

I spoke with someone at a local shop and they informed me that it sounds as if this is all probably due to the clear containers. I described whats been happening to them. They instructed me to apply black duck-tape to the outside of my palms containers. They said the roots will become damaged when exposed to sunlight along the side of the container. I've now applied the tape, this so I hope that will help them and allow them to recover. I put 3 layers of tape on it just to make sure. But, it makes a lot of sense, sense you don't ever see clear pots for sale. Probably for this reason. 

Once my Washy builds up its roots more I'll re-pot it into a larger black container I bought today. Its just about 12CM X 12CM so it should allow more room for it to grow.      

Edited by RobustaEnvirons
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Laaz

Stick them in the ground... These are 10 years from 1 gal size, now 30 ft tall.

2nro8ow.jpg

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smithgn
4 hours ago, Laaz said:

Stick them in the ground... These are 10 years from 1 gal size, now 30 ft tall.

2nro8ow.jpg

Laaz, even in our past winter where I got down to 20 and 19 degrees, my robustas exhibited a lot of burn.  I don't think RobustaEvirons wants to kill his Robustas, as he's in Ohio; they wouldn't stand a chance. I think he plans on keeping them indoors during the winter and outdoors during late spring through early fall. I think it can be done, but there are going to be side effects. RobustaEnvirons, have you thought about going balls to the wall with outdoor protection if you ever did consider planting outdoors? It can be done, but of course would be A LOT of work and planning.

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Laaz

Robusta's grow so fast it is about impossible to grow them as house plants.

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RobustaEnvirons
3 minutes ago, Laaz said:

Robusta's grow so fast it is about impossible to grow them as house plants.

Well, so far my largest Washy hasn't been in a big hurry, it's not too large. I've had it a year since buying it in eBay from a seller in Nevada (they got it from their backyard). It was probably 6 months old then.

I myself started 4 seeds back in January & February and two of them have been fast to grow. The other two have been rather slow. They don't seem bothered honestly.

They are all healthy, just don't seem to grow as rapidly as you all seem to keep saying. For peets sake, one of my two smallest seedlings (from seed) still has only 3 "grass-blade" size leafs on it! All my seeds sprouted with exactly the environmental variables, soil mixture, moisture level, sunlight level, and temperature. But, each seed has grown at slightly a different speed.

Haha, the two smallest sprouted in January but the seeds that sprouted in February have rapidly grown! The February seeds have wasted no time, they are strong, tall, and vibrant.

I think here in my climate they grow much slower overall, they do seem to grow but indeed slower. 

I have to keep them potted for mobility and take them indoors at the end of Fall since Winter will destroy them here (we can get as cold as -10F in Winter with various feet of snow, ice, no sunshine for sometimes a week or so at a time).

In my Southwest facing bay window they seem to do quite nicely in Winter. Our house is set at 73F-78F in Winter. They make it through Winter decently, and I put them back outside when Spring eventually rolls back around. 

I'm trying to meet their environmental requirements the best I can. I like them potted, and I'm trying to achieve this the way Pal Meir did (or does) with his Palms. It is possible to keep Washies and many other palms potted for a very long while if done correctly. I've him so it, and he's in Germany which probably gets colder than me. My goal is to try to keep it going for 7-10 years, in its potted environment meeting it's requirements. 

I'm moving to Florida next Summer anyhow, so even if I'm not as successful as I'd like at least I'll then be in a more Palm conducive environment. 

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RobustaEnvirons
8 hours ago, smithgn said:

Laaz, even in our past winter where I got down to 20 and 19 degrees, my robustas exhibited a lot of burn.  I don't think RobustaEvirons wants to kill his Robustas, as he's in Ohio; they wouldn't stand a chance. I think he plans on keeping them indoors during the winter and outdoors during late spring through early fall. I think it can be done, but there are going to be side effects. RobustaEnvirons, have you thought about going balls to the wall with outdoor protection if you ever did consider planting outdoors? It can be done, but of course would be A LOT of work and planning.

That's exactly right! You hit the nail on the head. I could never plant any palm tree outside aside from Needle palm or maybe Trachycarpus Fortunei and Trachycarpus Wagneriuanus. The Trachy's would probably need some kind of Winter protection though since even as tough as they are, they wouldn't probably survive our Winters. I think the Needle palm could survive my zone 6B winters unprotected, but I don't know. Certainly for the first couple years I'd need to protect it. The Needle palm is the hardiest of all palms.   

A Washingtonia Robusta would (like you've stated), stand no chance. It can drop below their threshold well before Halloween around my region. You're right though, I plan on keeping my Washies in a pot, indoors for as long as I can. I do put them outside once Spring rolls in, around April/May. They'll thrive in Late Spring/Summer/Early Fall. Then when late September hits, I pull them inside and they'll coast through Winter, hopefully just maintaining what foliage they have. 

I have actually given a lot of thought about planting a palm tree outdoors in the ground. Its interesting to me. Even though I know they couldn't ever make it through the Winter (if left unprotected), I can't help but think If I could somehow just get them through they'd arrive in Spring and be able to continue normal growth.

I think if I did ever plant them, I'd spray their leaves with "FreezePruf", then I'd wrap them with Christmas lights (non-LED), then I'd cover them with a burlap bag (snugly with tape), and lastly I'd try to make a shelter for it from a wood frame and plastic wrap. I think it could have a good chance of survival with all that stuff every year. But, it would indeed become very challenging once it got too tall. Not to mention that's a lot of work too, I'm not sure if I could keep it up indefinitely. 

In September of 2017 (the end of next summer) I'm permanently moving down to Florida anyhow, so there wouldn't be any point in planting any palm trees here in NW Ohio.  

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RobustaEnvirons

UPDATE: I just wanted to update everyone on how my little Washingtonia Robusta are doing! They're indeed becoming not-so-little anymore, lol. They're growing at a steady and consistent rate now. I've been leaving them outside everyday now for about a month or so. I bring them inside every evening after sunset. They've responded very positively to be outside. We've had mostly sunny days with temps in the 80s and 90s since I've put them outside. 

Since starting these from seed (sent to me from Pando in California) in January and February they've done pretty well. So far I've sprouted a total of 6 Robusta from seed and I've had zero losses. So that's good I think. I'm giving some of my Robusta to a couple family members; they want to try their hand at keeping them. I've written up instructions for them that explain how to keep them going.  

And a couple of weeks ago I decided to sprout another from seed (for my personal collection). I wanted to see if one would go if I neglected it and didn't put any effort into sprouting it. All I did was just drop it into an old flowerpot (with an existing flower still in it, lol) full of left over potting mix that I had sitting on our deck outside. I gave it no attention and it sprouted without a problem. It took about 2-3 weeks outside in that flower pot. I can't believe how truly easy Washy are to propagate!

I dug it up to check on its progress, and I dropped it into a new pot. I made up a fresh mix (a legit pot I bought from a local shop) where it'll live from now on. This new pot is probably what I should've been using from the start; its black to keep out light, a decent size, has drainage holes on the bottom sides (instead of the bottom), and is a standard size (rather unlike the Powerade bottles I've been using).

For my personal collection I'm up to a total of 3, and possibly 4 if my aunt decides not to take hers. If she doesn't want hers I'll keep it and have 4! I never tire of Robusta! I'd have 100 if I had the space. 

Robusta I have in my collection: 

  1. 1-Robusta I bought in July 2015 from an ebay seller in Nevada (they dug it up from their backyard)
  2. 1-Robusta I started from seed in January
  3. 1 Robusta that I'm growing for my aunt, if she doesn't want it I'll keep it (started from seed in February)
  4. 1-Robusta that I just dropped into soil a few weeks ago with little care for. 

I've learned so much this past year trying to grow Robusta. Even though I love them, once I move to Florida next year I plan on trying some other species to add to my collection. Palms are quite a hobby to have.  

 

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Edited by RobustaEnvirons

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RobustaEnvirons

IMAG1517.jpg

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Alicehunter2000

Richard you should probably think about more sustainable long term species and expand your collection to include them. That way when your little washies become too big you will still have other palms longer term. Phil from Jungle Music has a couple of great informational articles on Palms in Containers and Palms as Houseplants that get into the best species for long term pot culture and interior light levels etc. Additionally PT has many threads relating to the subject as well....Pal Meir's expertise on the subject is one example...... Just because you are in Ohio doesn't mean that you can't grow palms.....but you might want to rethink your long term strategy. BTW your washies look great. 

http://www.junglemusic.net/palmadvice/palms-containers1.htm

http://www.junglemusic.net/palmadvice/palms-houseplants1.htm

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RobustaEnvirons
2 hours ago, Alicehunter2000 said:

Richard you should probably think about more sustainable long term species and expand your collection to include them. That way when your little washies become too big you will still have other palms longer term. Phil from Jungle Music has a couple of great informational articles on Palms in Containers and Palms as Houseplants that get into the best species for long term pot culture and interior light levels etc. Additionally PT has many threads relating to the subject as well....Pal Meir's expertise on the subject is one example...... Just because you are in Ohio doesn't mean that you can't grow palms.....but you might want to rethink your long term strategy. BTW your washies look great. 

http://www.junglemusic.net/palmadvice/palms-containers1.htm

http://www.junglemusic.net/palmadvice/palms-houseplants1.htm

Thank you for all the great information. I appreciate your advise and encouragement. I agree with you though, and I definitely want to think about other long-term species to add to my collection. I do want to have more variety in my collection. The only thing right now is my rather limited space. I live with family, and I am booked up on available space for palms. My grandma (who I live with) doesn't really want me to have more than 4 palms. And that's what I'm about up to now. Since I live with family, I have to rely on using our southwest-facing bay window in the living room during the winter to get my palms through to springtime. I myself live in an unheated/uncooled sun-room year-round, so my palms cannot survive out there once fall swings around in October. 

I don't plan on living in Ohio forever though. I have a plan to move out of my grandma's house in September of 2017, and move to Florida (probably the Orlando vicinity to begin with). So I'm limited on space to grow palms and money for tinkering with them as well. So I think for now I'm probably just going to have to just stick with my Washy's I've got. Then, when I move to Florida I can probably begin experimenting with various different species and stuff. Plus I'll have a more suitable climate for different types of palms.        

Thanks for the links, Its looks like great information. I really could have used a lot of that info when I first started back in the fall 2015. Lol. I made mistake after mistake, but I've learned from them. I still make mistakes, lol. I have heard of Pal Meir here on PT. He really knows a lot! Especially about growing palms in pots! He has posted on a couple of my other threads as well, his info is always helpful.

I personally try to take great pride and care with my Washies and I tend to them everyday. I think with stragegic re-potting, and tending to them, I think I could probably get 7-10 years out of a Washy.  

I appreciate the comment! I've tried hard with them. Its not been a cakewalk, but with constant learning and trying out things to see what works I think they look good too! 

Thanks again!

Edited by RobustaEnvirons

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Mohsen

@Pal Meir

I bought this one few weeks ago as " American Cotton Palm" so my guess was it should be Filifera but now I am not sure...as the petioles are not pure green?

anyone can tell from the pics?

IMG_7283.JPG

IMG_7284.JPG

IMG_7285.JPG

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