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PS Palm Lover

Jubaea vs. Parajubaea in full sun, full heat of low desert

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PS Palm Lover

Hi All,

I have a question regarding which species would best tolerate full sun, heat (>100 days above 100F and many above 110F) in the SoCal low desert (Palm Springs, CA).

Parajubaea torallyi vs. Parajubaea sunkha vs. Jubaea chilensis. 

I have recently purchased all 3 but have not yet picked them up to plant them. I have 2 spots under a few larger trees' canopy so provides several hours morning and afternoon shade in the summer but need to plant one in a spot with full desert summer sun exposure. All are small 15-20g specimens not acclimated to the desert (Coming from San Diego region)

I am new to the forum and hoping some of you Parajubaea experts or fellow desert sun growers (Palm Springs/ Coachella Valley or Phoenix/low desert Arizona or other hot desert climates in the world) could help me out with this one. I appreciate your shared thoughts, thank you!

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Ben in Norcal
3 hours ago, PS Palm Lover said:

Hi All,

I have a question regarding which species would best tolerate full sun, heat (>100 days above 100F and many above 110F) in the SoCal low desert (Palm Springs, CA).

Parajubaea torallyi vs. Parajubaea sunkha vs. Jubaea chilensis. 

I have recently purchased all 3 but have not yet picked them up to plant them. I have 2 spots under a few larger trees' canopy so provides several hours morning and afternoon shade in the summer but need to plant one in a spot with full desert summer sun exposure. All are small 15-20g specimens not acclimated to the desert (Coming from San Diego region)

I am new to the forum and hoping some of you Parajubaea experts or fellow desert sun growers (Palm Springs/ Coachella Valley or Phoenix/low desert Arizona or other hot desert climates in the world) could help me out with this one. I appreciate your shared thoughts, thank you!

All should be fine with some acclimatization.  Keep the Parajubaea DRY in the summer months.

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DoomsDave

Welcome aboard, EssyN!

I'm pretty sure Jubes would be okay.

Parajubes, being from the Andes might not take the heat as well.

BUT! Try them and tell us, unless someone more experienced has a definite no!

How about some pictures of your garden?

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TexasColdHardyPalms

The pj tvt burns really bad here in the summer with full sun and 100 degrees. I had to put them all in afternoon shade after a few died. Jubaea take 105+ and full sun without too much issue. The older fronds will have the color wash out a bit. 

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Ben in Norcal

No issues here with 105+ degrees and full sun/low humidity for Parajubaea - UNLESS they are wet. Then they are door nails.

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PS Palm Lover

Thank you, all, I appreciate it! and thank you for the welcome!

Having read your comments here and on other threads on this wonderful blog, it seems too much water to the feet is bad for parajubes but too much to head bad for jubes. I saw a photo on one of the forums of a badly burnt jubes in Palm Desert (15 minutes down the street, same climate) and worried about that for this jubes from sun damage. This full spot sun is on a lawn and gets water from sprinklers... could be too wet possibly for both, yet I do not over water. Tricky though.

So, now wondering if you all think Ravenea glauca would be better in that full sun spot with lawn at feet and sprinkler water sprayed (not a bubbler sprinkler like in my other spots) on  the trunk (not to crown really) ?? 

Final advise appreciated, thanks again!

I will try and get some photos of my garden up. I have grown nicely in the low desert heat over the years these palm species with no issues: twin Roystonea regias, a few Dypsis decaryi, a decent Wodyetia bifurcata, a so-so Caryota urens (some sun damage in summer, bit more than the wodyetia though both are still fairly young, but I have seen a couple of much larger specimens of both in other gardens in Palm Springs) jubaea x butia and also syagrus hybrid (s.schyzo + s.romanz) D.lutescens in a shaded spot is thriving and all the usual other locally tried/tested palms (nannorrhops, sabals, phoenix species, bismarkia, syagrus, brahea, butia, and washingtonias of course!).  

I have noticed the Roystonea and Dypsis can get frost-bitten at 30 degrees, but minimal. The Dypsis don't mind some afternoon shade if possible but mine too tall now to cover and seem to have adapted well. The Wodyetia and Caryota need some shade for the summer here and are protected from afternoon sun under the canopy of other trees.

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DoomsDave

A lot of what's great here in places like OC and LA and IE will have a tough time in PS.

If not DOA, then dead after a while . . .

The key difference is that high heat lasts for months. It's not always easy to tell what will take that heat and what won't. Sometimes extra water won't do it. I'd check with "old desert denizens" before I spent a lot of money on a specimen I'm unsure of.

One thing that will take the heat is . . . . COCONUTS! Cocos are a huge fetish for us Californians, because the desert appears to be the only place they'll grow reliably well, as long as it doesn't freeze too often. They grow in Saudi Arabia. (Along with dates.)

I direct your attention to the Palm Society of Southern California's website, where a meeting in the Palm Desert area is described. The big attraction at the first garden was a maturing coconut! We screamed. We howled, we swooned.  PSSC November 2015 meeting

I am the Treasurer of the PSSC, and this is a blatant attempt to get you interested in joining, if you wish. PM me if you like, and I'll give you my secret cell phone number . . . You can also PM Mr. Lopez, our uber-gracious host of the November 2015 meeting.

There are lots of other cool palms that will take the heat, including Cocothrinax, Pseudophoenix, Phoenix, and many others.

 

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Ben in Norcal

I do not think a R. glauca will look it's best in full sun there, irrespective of water.  Also, confirming I would NOT put the Parajube in a full sun position that gets a lot of water unless drainage is VERY good.  Sounds like the Jubaea may be the best bet for that area - or some of the others Dave mentioned.

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Danilopez89

IMG_20151026_25965.thumb.jpg.e7ae896544f

IMG_20151026_45549.thumb.jpg.7d520208bb7

Jubea does good here. Even in full sun. The others mentioned won't take full sun like these fatty Jubes will.

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PS Palm Lover

Thanks all for the advice. I will put the Jubes in the full sun and the P.sunkha and R.glauca in the shadier spots.

Thanks for the invite, DoomsDave, I will join. I read the link, wish I could have seen both Coachella Valley homes. There are a few amazing homes in Palm Springs proper that I think are worth seeing for the next PSSC meeting if ever held in the CV again. 

I must confess I followed that amazing thread of yours, Danilopez, in the fall, regarding the 2 Cocos in the CV and found it mind-blowing and hard to believe, I guess you really have to see it to believe it. Given we have several nights of frost every year here in the winter, those Cocos must be tough! Seems the PSSC has made the LQ one official now.

I appreciate your photos on the jubes, are those 2 from a house in La Quinta?

Dani, any chance you would be willing to see one of those 2 Cocos I see you have home grown? They look promising, how much? ....I think I have just the spot for them.......

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Danilopez89

No, the Jubes are in Rancho Mirage. And no I will not sell my cocos:violin:Sorry. 

But I can let you know where you can buy some.:)

They usually have them for sale at Lowes or HD. Or you can buy some from ebay. There is plenty of coconut tree sellers on ebay.

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PS Palm Lover

ok, thank you and good luck on that new spot in your front yard, whether it be Cocos or Attalea.

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