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colin Peters

Nice pics Tim, any idea where those were.??  Those are really tall in comparison to the upper level ones .

aloha

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Big Eye
On 6/5/2019 at 1:38 PM, Tracy said:

I'm just not feeling Pritchardia martii at this point with mine.  Curious what your little guy looks like 2 years later Matt (the one pictured above for the leaf underside).  Can anyone match it with a different Pritcharida species?

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@Tracy Did you come to a conclusion on what this may be?  I am in the same boat as you are/were.  I would guess maybe beccariana?  Please don't take my guess serious.  I'm as green as the underside as those leaves :floor:

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Big Eye

Here is a pic of mine that was purchased as perlmanii. The undersides are green like yours but have some browning/whitish "fuzz" on the petiole. 

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Tracy
55 minutes ago, Big Eye said:

@Tracy Did you come to a conclusion on what this may be?  I am in the same boat as you are/were.  I would guess maybe beccariana?  Please don't take my guess serious.  I'm as green as the underside as those leaves :floor:

I am still waiting for it to get larger and someday produce fruit that may assist in the id.  I do know that it is very different from my Pritchardia beccariana which has flatter more 2 dimensional leaves and proportionally for the plant much larger leaves.  Here P beccariana is also much more susceptible to spotting from our coldest winter temps.  Good luck with your id.  For those more familiar with the genus, photos of the entire palm as well as close ups of the trunk will be helpful.

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Tracy
On 6/5/2019 at 8:01 PM, quaman58 said:

have to agree, probably not martii. But it's got the nice big circular flat leaves, which is cool. It is a knock off of a Jungle Music "lanaiensis" that I'm growing. So, assuming that it was correctly labeled when I bought it (always a precarious assumption with Pritchardia), if you follow that bread crumb trail through Don Hodel's book, it would be glabrata. I know, that's a lot of assumptions...

So Bret, do my updated photos still look like the plant you got from Jungle Music as Pritchardia lanaiensis?  Mine is starting to show some lepidota on the underside of the leaflet margins, but not dispersed through the rest of the leaf underside.  It doesn't have the prominent triangular liguales that Matty's P martii have as shown in photos earlier in this thread.  It's attractive even though I have no doubt at this point that it is not Pritchardia martii.

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Frond-friend42

I'm thinking that is P. glabrata, Tracy. Looks like the palmpedia pics. Such a beauty!

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quaman58

Tracy,

 Yours is a lot more lush looking than mine is, so I guess you need to compare with a somewhat filtered eye.   Whether it is the palm itself, or the rather exposed area  (only a few feet from a big Washingtonia as well), it is somewhat slow growing, and has remained rather short and stocky.  Interestingly, it also yellows out a lot during the winter, only to green up nicely with the return of warm weather, year in, year out. It's the only Pritchardia have that does this. The yellow mid-rib on the leaves stand out a lot on this one. Here you go..

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Edited by quaman58

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Tracy
7 hours ago, quaman58 said:

Whether it is the palm itself, or the rather exposed area

Very nice specimen Bret.  There is definitely a difference in exposure that yours receives compared to mine.  Mine receives almost the opposite, some filtering from my neighbor's Howea's on the other side of the fence, my house to the south blocking winter sunlight and a solitary Dypsis pembana overhead immediately to the west.  As you note, it's hard to ascertain if the cultural differences translate into the appearance differences or if it is more fundamental genetics.  I had some droopy leaftips after the Dypsis pembana dropped a frond on them, but as soon as I bent them back up the droopy leaf tips disappeared on the two leaves.

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realarch

Tracy, not so sure yours is P. martii, and I doubt it is P. glabrara either. Given the variability of the species and the difficulty of identifying younger plants, your’s just doesn’t look like a P. martii as you’ve already suspected. To be even less help, I have no idea what it could be.

The seed for my P. Martii came from a wild population on Oahu and I must say, it’s just a stunning palm. To me, it’s right up there with P. viscosa. 

My P. glabrata also came from a trusted source and the two species, appearance wise, could not be more different. 

Here are a few photos of both palms and check out the leaf stiffness and the amount of lepida on the P. martii, both on the underside and the apical end of the petiole.  

The P. glabrata will be on a separate post.

Tim

 

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realarch

Here are a few photos of P. glabrata, so different. Squat, wide, soft pendulous leaves, and copious clusters of seed,  In one of the photos there is a P. martii in the background, the difference is obvious. These natives are located in the ‘wild’ part of the garden.

Tim

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Tracy
3 hours ago, realarch said:

Tracy, not so sure yours is P. martii, and I doubt it is P. glabrara either. Given the variability of the species and the difficulty of identifying younger plants, your’s just doesn’t look like a P. martii as you’ve already suspected. To be even less help, I have no idea what it could be.

The seed for my P. Martii came from a wild population on Oahu and I must say, it’s just a stunning palm. To me, it’s right up there with P. viscosa. 

My P. glabrata also came from a trusted source and the two species, appearance wise, could not be more different. 

Here are a few photos of both palms and check out the leaf stiffness and the amount of lepida on the P. martii, both on the underside and the apical end of the petiole

I fell in love with P martii while visiting some public gardens on Oahu while surfing the north shore with my sons several years back.  When I saw one come up at a palm society auction I wasn't going to miss the opportunity.  Initially when this wasn't looking like a P martii, I considered removing it and trying to find the real deal to replace it.  I've given up on that, as much as I love the P. martii look and decided to keep this one in place, whatever it is.  I have to agree that your P glabrata looks different as well.  Mine has none of the pendant leaftips one would expect of P glabrata.  I guess I have the inverse of your trusted seed sources for my Pritchardia, not that I'm saying anyone did anything intentional to mislabel it.  Perhaps the difficult identification is because it's a hybrid and so doesn't show all the right characteristics for any true species.  Someday it will flower and hopefully that will provide additional clues to the puzzle.

I love your P martii and really like the P glabrata!  :drool:

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Briank
On 11/17/2020 at 7:11 AM, quaman58 said:

Tracy,

 Yours is a lot more lush looking than mine is, so I guess you need to compare with a somewhat filtered eye.   Whether it is the palm itself, or the rather exposed area  (only a few feet from a big Washingtonia as well), it is somewhat slow growing, and has remained rather short and stocky.  Interestingly, it also yellows out a lot during the winter, only to green up nicely with the return of warm weather, year in, year out. It's the only Pritchardia have that does this. The yellow mid-rib on the leaves stand out a lot on this one. Here you go..

IMG_1405.JPG

IMG_1406.JPG

My Martii looks Like that!  Can’t wait for 10 more years to see it grow little taller lol. 

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