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cassowaryhill

Biggest Beccariophoenix alfredii north of Monterey

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John Case
1 minute ago, Ben in Norcal said:

Sure...I picked one up at a big box to put in a 15g pot, which it will sit in a few years.  Have you had yours in any sun/outside?

They have been outside for 6 weeks in 3 hours of sun a day....

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_Keith

Mine, but hey it is Louisiana so shocked they are  still alive, lol.  Keeping up TropicDocs faith.

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Zeeth

Looking good! 

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Phoenikakias
On 25/3/2016, 3:48:15, cassowaryhill said:

All Very nice. Its hard to decide how to grow them here. Seeing we have the same weather as SanFran... Maybe more sunlight hours.. But move it full sun in winter? and then shade for Summer?

Hi there,

I think Melbourne can be very warm during local summer. In this respect it resembles Athens in Greece. maybe a semi shady spot would be better.

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Hammer
On 3/25/2016, 12:29:21, Pip said:

From what age should B. alfredii be planted out in full sun in climates similar to coastal California?

I had 2 in liners that I potted up to 1 gallons.  They were in full sun all summer next to a swimming pool.  They grew like weeds 

 

11 hours ago, _Keith said:

Mine, but hey it is Louisiana so shocked they are  still alive, lol.  Keeping up TropicDocs faith.

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Keith, what's the coldest temps and duration at that temp that your  Alfies have experienced? 

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cassowaryhill

Awesome guys!! Keep up the posts! 

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cassowaryhill
7 hours ago, Phoenikakias said:

Hi there,

I think Melbourne can be very warm during local summer. In this respect it resembles Athens in Greece. maybe a semi shady spot would be better.

Yeah that's what I would have thought but there is the one guy that has them in full sun in Melbourne and no leaf burn. 

Edited by cassowaryhill
Mistake

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cassowaryhill

I think Jeff Searles is the biggest .... 

But I think Lens looks the nicest ... :) 

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Ben in Norcal
32 minutes ago, cassowaryhill said:

Yeah that's what I would have thought but there is the one guy that has them in full sun in Melbourne and no leaf burn. 

These take 100+ degrees Fahrenheit, for days at a time (highs), in full sun, no worries.  These are full sun palms everywhere except perhaps extreme desert conditions, IMO.

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tim_brissy_13

Definitely full sun in Melbourne, no problems

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Hammer

Totally agree.  Except Phoenix or Palm Springs, full sun.

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RedRabbit
20 hours ago, _Keith said:

Mine, but hey it is Louisiana so shocked they are  still alive, lol.  Keeping up TropicDocs faith.

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It looks good! It is about the same size as mine, but I've still got it in a pot... Need to find a place for it and get it planted. :)

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palmfriend

Beautiful thread!

My little "army" of beccarios has just popped out of their seeds (22 out of 24), so if no one minds,

I am going to join this competition...:D

But , anyway, thanks for all the pictures and the information about this species (when to put in full sun etc.),

I am really appreciating it. 

Just one question:

Is anything known about how storm proof they are?

best regards

 

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Josh-O
1 hour ago, palmfriend said:

Beautiful thread!

My little "army" of beccarios has just popped out of their seeds (22 out of 24), so if no one minds,

I am going to join this competition...:D

But , anyway, thanks for all the pictures and the information about this species (when to put in full sun etc.),

I am really appreciating it. 

Just one question:

Is anything known about how storm proof they are?

best regards

 

welcome to the club :) 

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cassowaryhill

Today I went to the Melbourne  botanical gardens to find the sole Becarriophoenix alfredii... :) was quiet happy I found it! 

image.jpeg

Edited by cassowaryhill
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Mandrew968
On 3/25/2016, 10:44:32, Ben in Norcal said:

That's still 10 years and no trunking specimens...I consider that pretty slow.

Mine is not ten years old but it is what it is--I am just happy for a good looking palm that is not showing any signs of stress.

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buccaneers37

Planted out from a 10 gallon in June of 2010. 8" at the base, 12ft. to tip. Compare it to when it was planted. The one closest to the fence is less than 1/2 this size.

56f92176d1059_Beccariophoenixalfredii3-256f92178d36f9_Beccariophoenixalfredii3-2

56f9220372a70_B.alfrediiPT.thumb.jpg.646

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Mohsen
3 hours ago, cassowaryhill said:

Today I went to the Melbourne  botanical gardens to find the sole Becarriophoenix alfredii... :) was quiet happy I found it! 

image.jpeg

Thanks Shane for sharing...how long it has been there? do you have a closer pic?

Cheers

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cassowaryhill

Here is a close up. Sorry should have posted the close up as well

image.jpeg

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Phoenikakias
55 minutes ago, cassowaryhill said:

Here is a close up. Sorry should have posted the close up as well

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To be honest, it does not look to me happy enough! I think I see to many scorched leaflets...

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Kostas

These don't burn easily at all. Maybe not watering enough/watering too shallow or watering too much is its problem? Unless it was grown in deep shade, I don't see why it burned that much

 

the newest leaf does seem happy and adapted though, and that's what matters

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cassowaryhill

I think it's all got to do with watering. That's brown on the edges not the whole leaf. No nearby water sprinklers either 

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cassowaryhill

Otherwise it's actually not too bad .. It's still green as ... 

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Kostas

They are pretty reluctant to burn. They prefer to dehisce older leafs sooner if not getting enough water rather than burn on the edges. Probably a combination of sudden lack of water at first and coming out the shadehouse 

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cassowaryhill

I think low humidity as well. This guy would have come from QLD I recon 

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Kostas

I have planted one from a shady, humid/wet greenhouse in Germany in a sunny location in Greece and it just spotted(subsequent leafs downsized and took awhile for it to root enough to take off but existing leafs didn't burn)...Water availability was good though

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Tyrone

This is one species that seems to be growing awesome for me down here at 35S in WA. I'm not quite as far south as Melbourne Victoria. I have grown these since 2007 when I first could get seeds and they are basically a tropical looking palm that doesn't really need or want the tropics, or equatorial tropics anyway. Unlike the other Beccariophoenix, B alfredii does not like wet humid conditions at all. They want a drier cooler climate and this is all due to their mountain origins.

Honestly these can be considered a true cool climate coconut look alike. Whatever makes a coconut look good, makes these look good. That means full sun from an early age, good drainage and good watering through hot weather, along with a good amount of fertiliser. I let mine get a bit pot bound and shade grown, as I had no room to plant them out in my Perth garden and so I brought the lot down to my Albany property. They burnt a bit when thrown straight out into full sun from shade, but they quickly put out new fronds that didn't care about receiving 40 plus C in full sun. I'm going to plant some of my smaller ones out soon (just before winter) that have only started to go pinnate, as I reckon they will get into the ground and bulk up quicker than the ones left in the pots for a bit too long. I'm so glad that I can have a coconut look alike that will look pristine down here at the most southerly part of WA. They will really fool people when they get big.

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cassowaryhill
6 hours ago, Tyrone said:

This is one species that seems to be growing awesome for me down here at 35S in WA. I'm not quite as far south as Melbourne Victoria. I have grown these since 2007 when I first could get seeds and they are basically a tropical looking palm that doesn't really need or want the tropics, or equatorial tropics anyway. Unlike the other Beccariophoenix, B alfredii does not like wet humid conditions at all. They want a drier cooler climate and this is all due to their mountain origins.

Honestly these can be considered a true cool climate coconut look alike. Whatever makes a coconut look good, makes these look good. That means full sun from an early age, good drainage and good watering through hot weather, along with a good amount of fertiliser. I let mine get a bit pot bound and shade grown, as I had no room to plant them out in my Perth garden and so I brought the lot down to my Albany property. They burnt a bit when thrown straight out into full sun from shade, but they quickly put out new fronds that didn't care about receiving 40 plus C in full sun. I'm going to plant some of my smaller ones out soon (just before winter) that have only started to go pinnate, as I reckon they will get into the ground and bulk up quicker than the ones left in the pots for a bit too long. I'm so glad that I can have a coconut look alike that will look pristine down here at the most southerly part of WA. They will really fool people when they get big.

Yeah but you have so much amazing stuff... Lucky man! Iv see what you got Tyrone ! lol can I come steal some of your stuff? 

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Tyrone

That's probably from my Perth garden. I've had to start from scratch down here in a much harder climate to grow tropicals, although it is more humid than Perth. I've been madly collecting palms for 16 years, so you tend to get hold of some good stuff in that time, but the list of what I've killed will make you cry.

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Mohsen

thanks for the nice thread :)

anyone has any experiences how easy they are with transplanting? I might need to dig mine and plant it somewhere else soon...

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cassowaryhill
21 hours ago, Mohsen said:

thanks for the nice thread :)

anyone has any experiences how easy they are with transplanting? I might need to dig mine and plant it somewhere else soon...

Good question... Anybody else know

?

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Ben in Norcal

In my experience with transplanting, they tend to survive but are definitely set back.

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quaman58

I agree with Ben. Cardiff Bill transplanted a palm about 6' a bit over two years ago since it was too close to a sewer line. It looked like it wasn't going to make it, but about 3 months later began growing well again. 

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SoTropiCal Ben

Hey Shane, I haven't had problems transplanting any of mine and I've done it several times, I just use a good root activator with kelp, for several weeks after.

Also, I'm not north of Monterey but mine have seen wind-chills down to 29˚.  We also got an inch of snow back in December of 2013 (that was a shocker!)  They pulled through just fine.

Here are my largest ones... I measured them today and two of them are 10' tall from soil to top leaf and the bases are about a foot wide now, soon to trunk so I'm excited...

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Silas_Sancona
On 3/27/2016, 6:01:33, Hammer said:

Totally agree.  Except Phoenix or Palm Springs, full sun.

Hrmmm,, Test this theory here, i must.

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cassowaryhill
1 hour ago, SoTropiCal Ben said:

Hey Shane, I haven't had problems transplanting any of mine and I've done it several times, I just use a good root activator with kelp, for several weeks after.

Also, I'm not north of Monterey but mine have seen wind-chills down to 29˚.  We also got an inch of snow back in December of 2013 (that was a shocker!)  They pulled through just fine.

Here are my largest ones... I measured them today and two of them are 10' tall from soil to top leaf and the bases are about a foot wide now, soon to trunk so I'm excited...

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Yours are simply fantastic!!! Thank you for this... Given me a massive smile and very coconutty looking.... Iv lived in somewhere in comparison to Hawaii so I know a coconut when I see one 

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Tyrone
6 hours ago, SoTropiCal Ben said:

Hey Shane, I haven't had problems transplanting any of mine and I've done it several times, I just use a good root activator with kelp, for several weeks after.

Also, I'm not north of Monterey but mine have seen wind-chills down to 29˚.  We also got an inch of snow back in December of 2013 (that was a shocker!)  They pulled through just fine.

Here are my largest ones... I measured them today and two of them are 10' tall from soil to top leaf and the bases are about a foot wide now, soon to trunk so I'm excited...

FullSizeRender(8).jpg

IMG_2233.JPG

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If that's seen an inch of snow, WOW. A coconut look alike that takes snow, that's awesome.

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SoTropiCal Ben

Shane, Tyrone, I actually took a pic before all the snow melted and I did wash most of the snow that morning but there was light snow on most of the leaves...

IMG_0330.jpeg

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SoTropiCal Ben

Correction, it was actually Dec. of '14 not '13 when it snowed...  Here's a pic of the base for scale...  It could be more like 10", I was trying to get the edge of the last dead petiole...

IMG_2224.JPG

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cassowaryhill
8 hours ago, SoTropiCal Ben said:

Shane, Tyrone, I actually took a pic before all the snow melted and I did wash most of the snow that morning but there was light snow on most of the leaves...

IMG_0330.jpeg

WOW!! Look at that!! Come on Temperate and Subtropical world... Stop with the planting of Phoenix canariensis and start these guys for a truly tropical looking coconut substitute !!!!

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