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Palmarum

The 18th Annual Spring 'Ganza in the So Flo. - Palms & Plants for the Masses

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Palmarum

The 18th Annual Spring Plant Extravaganza!

Searle Brothers Nursery, Inc. &

The Rainforest Collection®

----

SW Ranches, Broward County, S. Florida

March 4th, 5th, 6th - 11th, 12th, 13th - 2016

 

Warmer winter? So so. Plants growing? Check. Wet winter? Definitely. There were a surplus of positive growing conditions this past winter in S. Florida. It was evident throughout gardens, backyards, container collections, and other places friendly to plant-folk and their charges. Plants grown in the nursery were exhibiting spring fever as the rains came in late January and were more than ready for display when the time came for the Spring 'Ganza. This effect, combined with the ever increasing amount of palm and plant material, made for a rather large selection of species for a Spring sale. However, as it happens with most plant sale events, certain species were only available as a few plants, sometimes only as a sole individual. The plant hungry knew this. Throughout the six days of the gauntlet, collectors seemed to hone in on these rarer than rare species, leaving holes along the sidewalk and on the tables. One minute the plant was there, next it was gone.

I noticed a trend in among the collectors in attendance. They were more prone to being more experimental in their selections. Instead of grabbing one specimen, they would take two or three of the same species. The planned to try one in different subsections of their gardens; sun, shade, etc. This meant the selling out of plant size groups at a rapid pace, resulting in the rampant restocking where possible. This was constant and reduced the amount of opportunities I had for taking photos. I mentioned in the For Sale topic about trying video again, but I shall see.

The Spring 'Ganza was amazing considering the amount of plants available and the huge range of people in attendance. The familiar band of volunteers were there and all the regular Forum members were present, carts in tow. A lot of new faces were connected to numerous messages and emails. I like to comment on the weather where and whenever I can, but the weather for the first weekend was simply extraordinary.... beyond expectations. It seemed prepackaged for an outdoor event...

 

Friday, March 4th...

- 7:30AM - Early morning on the first Friday. A bit of a chill, but not enough for a jacket, knowing it will warm up quickly. I am in the shadehouse getting the palms ready, including any last minute signs, tags, plants, trimming, sale lists, etc. The tables were packed and I had to space some of the groups, just because the signs would over lap too much. The first table was loaded with the rarer of the rare.

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- One key spot along the shadehouse intersection was occupied by the Areca macrocalyx var. 'Mariae' collection, also known as the Red Macrocalyx, or the Red Highland Betel Nut Palm. The larger 10 gal. specimen was positioned to showcase the smaller 3 gallons around it.

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- The depth and hue of the color seems to be variable from plant to plant, but this individual has great color. The color increases in amount and intensity as the palm grows and ages. We were hoping the large one would remain at least long enough to sell all the smaller ones, (common dynamic situation at plant sales) but it doesn't always work out that way.

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- Organizing the tables can be compared to playing a three-dimensional game of Tetris. Not every species occupies a single row, some may be a lone 1 gallon or even a single 4 inch size, then working the sign in...

DSC_0265.jpg

Ryan

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Palmarum

- 7:31AM - Palms, palms and more palms... species of many different genera from all corners of the world.

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- The side entrance to the shadehouse, as the shaded palms along the sidewalk merge with the full sun section outside, turning to the right...

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- ... and to the left.

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- Turning around and looking back at the tables.

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Ryan

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Palmarum

- 7:35AM - At the end of the shadehouse by the main entrance, lies the tropical foliage section. Tables here are loaded with Aroids of different types, Philodendrons, Anthuriums, Calatheas and more.

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- The section can have, well anything. It is often a mixture of plants that need shade that do not fit into other groups. Volunteer and legendary plantsman Crafton Clift had just arrived and was looking over the Aroids.

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- 7:36AM - The sun was over the horizon and shining down on the landscape plants along the main road. The ground orchids, Epidendrum radicans, were new in this purple color. They were very popular and did not last long. They are usually seen in a orange/yellow color, like the single one on the left.

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- Last minute functions were being carried out all over the sales area. Amadeo was looking over the new layer of rock he added to the main road. That is Andrea Searle in the distance looking over the selection.

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Ryan

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Palmarum

- 7:36AM - As soon as Andrea got closer, she was spotted by Kylie. Reports of cars parking, and people gathering at the gate, began to filter their way to the sales area.

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- 7:38AM - A large Copernicia macroglossa, Cuban Petticoat Palm, anchored the corner display, where the main road turns and meets the side road. The prolifically flowering pink Pixie roses were in prime display mode. They are a type of polyantha rose. I had a photo display card for the roses, showing the flowers, but figured it wasn't needed...

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- 7:40AM - Donuts! The breakfast of champions. We each took turns grabbing one, or two. Kylie Searle had the first choice. 

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- 7:50AM - For those who like color, may I introduce the Croton section. It was a record number of cultivars for a Spring sale.

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Ryan

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Palmarum

- 7:52AM - Travis Searle walks daughter Kylie over to check out the Bromeliad section. She pets the new nursery puppy being held by great-uncle Larry Searle.

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- 7:53AM - Travis checks the time as Amber and Andrea watch Kylie pet the veteran nursery dog, Dumbo2. I could see movement in the distance as customers started to move from vehicle to a position near the gate. It was almost time to open.

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"By the way, where is Michelle?"

- 7:56AM - - With Jeff at the wheel, Himself, Andrea and I headed to the gate to open. As we went forward, we noticed a white car weaving through customers at the gate. It took a second to realize it was Michelle, who was late to the show.

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- As we got closer, customers got bunched up at the gate. Randy Searle gets the gate ready to swing open.

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Ryan

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Palmarum

- 7:57AM - Jeff jumped off the golf cart, greeted everyone to the nursery, then jumped back on as Andrea opened the gate.

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- As customers began to enter, Jeff took off with the golf cart... leaving Andrea behind...

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- We kept ahead of the wave as the customers walked right into the rising sun.

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- They were not running, but it was a speedy walking pace.

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Ryan

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Palmarum

- 7:58AM - Jeff pulled up and dropped me off so I could take a position to photograph. He double-backed to that spot on the left to greet people as they came in to the nursery.

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- Customers who spotted me in the glare said hello as they passed by.

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- Staying upfront, I was quickly outpaced by the faster first wave. Many of them had grabbed a cart and took off in any of a half-dozen directions by the time I made it over to the Holding Area. In the center, Forum member Rory (Rory) looks over the carts before selecting one.

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- Those customers that were not in too much of a hurry began to enter the sales area, with those now arriving in behind.

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Ryan

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Palmarum

- 7:59AM - In the center, customers and avid Croton collectors Mike and Lamar talk and walk at the same time as they make their way to the shadehouse. Off to the right and in the distance, I see a familiar collector with crutches...

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- Collector and sale regular Steve had made it to the sale, even with some special furniture attached to his leg.

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- 8:00AM - It took only a few minutes for the craziness to ensue over at the shadehouse entrance.

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- A cart parking lot formed as Croton collectors dove into the section. Lamar was quick and knew which ones to get first. I think that one in his hand is called 'Jungle Queen' but so many of them look-a-like to me.

DSC_0304.jpg

Ryan

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Palmarum

- 8:02AM - With the selection mixed and randomized, collectors went through in different ways. Some looked for leaves they knew (or didn't know) while others went group to group, checking tags.

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- 8:04AM - Customers hit the sidewalk and tables in force. I was pointing out species and locating others faster than I could photograph the action. Crafton was moving from section to section, answering questions.

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- Well it happened. The larger, more colorful representative of the Areca macrocalyx var. 'Mariae' group was grabbed before any of the smaller ones sold. It doesn't always happen, but it does. It was joined by a 5 gal. Calyptrocalyx leptostachys, 7 gal. Cyrtostachys renda (Red Sealing Wax Palm), and a 3 gal. Hydriastele sp. 'Highland P.N.G.'.

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- Landscape designer Greg K. walks up the sidewalk carrying a 7 gal. Pinanga sp. 'Blue Fruit'. A bit of glare got into the shot at the last second.

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Ryan

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doranakandawatta

OMG :yay:

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Palmarum

- 8:19AM - The sidewalk narrowed as carts became mobile holding areas.

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- 8:23AM - The stretch of sidewalk by the tables is often ample enough to allow traffic. But at times it gets packed solid and a little traffic control is needed.

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- 8:31AM - The leaf that sold a thousand plants. Well not a thousand but quite a few. This emerging red leaf on a Chambeyronia macrocarpa was perfectly timed with the first 'Ganza weekend. It was flawless and brilliant red. It was labeled 'not for sale' and placed behind the species group of 1 gallon, 3 gallon, 7 gallon and 15 gallon plants. They all sold and after restocking a few times, we ran out.

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- 8:46AM - Some plants just beg to be taken. Hard for plant-crazy enthusiasts to say no, especially to this Areca vestiaria.

DSC_0316.jpg

Ryan

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Kris

Dear Ryan,

Thanks for the visuals...and like always Jeff's Collection of palms are mind blowing.

This time i will be seeing this thread in all its grandeur.

Thanks & Love,

kris.

 

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Rafael

Unmistakable thread :drool:

The assortment of palm species, its healthy looking, with no exception, the "gate opening ritual", the way Ryan describes everything... :greenthumb::greenthumb::greenthumb:

Thanks Ryan! ;)

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Jeff Searle
1 hour ago, Rafael said:

Unmistakable thread :drool:

The assortment of palm species, its healthy looking, with no exception, the "gate opening ritual", the way Ryan describes everything... :greenthumb::greenthumb::greenthumb:

Thanks Ryan! ;)

Your definition of Ryan describing the Extravaganza Sale is pretty funny. Please consider in joining us for the next one........with a red shirt of course!

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doranakandawatta
6 hours ago, Rafael said:

Unmistakable thread :drool:

The assortment of palm species, its healthy looking, with no exception, the "gate opening ritual", the way Ryan describes everything... :greenthumb::greenthumb::greenthumb:

Thanks Ryan! ;)

YES, :greenthumb::greenthumb::greenthumb:,

Gladly it happens only once a year, it upsets too much my jealousy . :yay::yay:

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Palmarum

- 8:59AM - A stash begins to accumulate on a cart near the Croton section. The palm species ranged from fairly uncommon to extremely rare. The taller 3 gal. plant is a Golden Betel Nut Palm, Areca catechu cv. alba. From left to right, a 4in. Licuala montana, 1 gal. Licuala sallehana, (a small quart-sized Licuala thoana) 1 gal. Calyptrocalyx pachystachys, 1 gal. Basselinia pancheri, and a 1 gal. Dypsis sp. 'Bejoufa' on the right corner. A few other smaller palms are mixed in with them. This was just the first run through the shadehouse for this customer.

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- 9:03AM - The perfect weather of the first weekend included rather low humidity. It required some extra watering where needed, especially for the aroids, which included the Flowering Anthuriums.

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- 9:29AM - Friday morning saw no cease in activity. Everything from the small to large, common to rare were being carted off. In front of the white tent, the two specimens of the Sealing Wax Hybrid, Cyrtostachys sp. 'hybrid' were being grabbed in a hurry. The smaller of the two, a 10 gal., was being maneuvered by Tim on the left, while the larger 25 gallon plant was off frame to the right, too large to be photographed decently; it was touching the shade cloth 15 ft. (4.5m) above.

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- Jeff was describing the growing habit and required conditions of the Hybrid to the customer, who bought both plants.

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Ryan

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Palmarum

- 9:42AM - The full sun section of palms was looked through just as much as the shadehouse sidewalk. One notable palm from this area to make it onto a cart was a 20 gal. Coccothrinax miraguama subsp. havanensis. It is going to a great home via an enthusiastic customer.

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- 10:10AM - The 10 gal. Cyrtostachys sp. 'Hybrid' gets escorted by Travis to the holding area. The larger one would have to be delivered and was too large and the shadehouse too busy, for it to be moved out.

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- 10:13AM - I see Forum members throughout the 'Ganza and it has become second nature, but I had to capture a shot of the Forum's own Hammer in action, Adam Brohimer, fresh in from Southern California. He had missed out on the 'Ganza before even with previous attempts to attend, due to scheduling issues, but had made it this time via an extra effort. It was great talking with him as we got serious insight to the SoCal palm world. He is holding his new Lanonia dasyantha that would hopefully work out as a 'personal item'.

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- 10:26AM - Up front, all is well. It was busy enough to warrant two lanes. The Citrus and Tropical Fruit Tree section on the left had a prime location in the sales area and was often the first area customers went in to browse.

DSC_0325.jpg

Ryan

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doranakandawatta

Sincerely, many thanks Ryan for all these pics.

How is Stromanthe stromanthoides 'Charlie' you showed us last year doing?
Did you see any beautiful beds of this Stromanthe 'Charlie'? It seems to be impossible to get it in Europe, sadly.

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Palmarum
24 minutes ago, doranakandawatta said:

... How is Stromanthe stromanthoides 'Charlie' you showed us last year doing?
Did you see any beautiful beds of this Stromanthe 'Charlie'? It seems to be impossible to get it in Europe, sadly.

'Charlie' has become a great plant for the shade and grows well in containers, but is a serious drinker (as expected) when it comes to water consumption when used in the landscape. It is still grown and produced, but perhaps not in as many numbers as it was last year. There is a constant supply of new plants being introduced to the market. They are always competing for attention and tend to push plants from previous years to the 'back burner'. I like the plant and think it should be used more often. It has great color and the bloom is unique with its yellow/orange color. It was named after the owner and grower of the original source plant, Charlie McDaniel, who I first met many, many years ago and was a world authority on medicinal plants and species of the Amazon. He passed away before he got to see his favorite rare plant in production.

I see planted groups here and there in collections and they look great. It is still considered a fairly new plant so if its popularity increases, so will its production, possibly ending up across the Atlantic. You might find a small plant or division for sale on eBay.

Ryan

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Palmarum

- 10:27AM - Volunteer Michelle Searle writes up a pair of orders. Sometimes the question of "who gets what" among friends isn't answered until the plants are in the checkout lane.

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- 10:30AM - The registers were three orders deep as Carlos was coming back with the tractor.

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- Had to make room for him as he was carrying more than plants...

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- He was pulling some extra Fakahatchee Grass, Tripsacum dactyloides, and picked up two customers in the process.

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Ryan

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Palmarum

- 10:31AM - Working his way through the holding area on crutches, collector Steve Resh talks with Jeff in behind everything as his wife, Carni pulls the cart out towards the road. This side of the cart shows a 3 gal. Areca catechu cv. alba, 5 gal. Calyptrocalyx leptostachys, and a 7 gal. Syagrus weddellianum (formerly in Lytocaryum).

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- On the other side, a 7 gal. 'Pink Diamond' Cordyline, 3 gal. Calyptrocalyx aff. fasiculatus, a 3 gal. Golden Brush Ginger, Burbidgea schizocheila, and a 1 gal. Chamaedorea ernesti-augusti.

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- 10:36AM - Carni and Steve were invited over to the house by Andrea for the traditional, Friday after sale Post Tour. It was going to be great as usual.

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- Travis gives a 'thumbs-up' as he escorts another group of plants out of the holding area.

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Ryan

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Palmarum

- 10:36AM - As he was moving out with the tractor and trailer, I noticed the 7 gal. Coccothrinax borhidiana at the rear of the group.

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- A pause in answering questions got me a moment to photograph this palm-rich group being formed in the holding area. A 7 gal. Calyptrogyne ghiesbreghtiana anchored the cart, and it was joined by a 4in. Dypsis dransfieldii, a 1 gal. Loxococcus rupicola, a tall 3 gal. Areca catechu cv. alba, and a 1 gal. Chamaedorea ernesti-augusti.

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- 10:39AM - We were once again, fortunate to have volunteer Crafton Clift during the 'Ganza. His knowledge is vast and ever expanding, as he continues to explore the world of plants.

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- 11:29AM - This could be considered the Extravaganza of the Babies, as young kids and young animals were a common trend throughout both weekends. Travis is holding new nursery puppy Gypsy Rose and is showing her to customer and palm world acquaintance Danielle and her new son, as Kylie looks on.

DSC_0341.jpg

Ryan

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Palmarum

- 11:30AM - Danielle's son was having his first interaction with a puppy. He was without an outfit due to an 'incident' with a muddy puddle shortly before entering the shadehouse.

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- Gypsy was exploring constantly and she was quickly learning the ways of the nursery. She was dropped off at the nursery gate by someone one morning and Larry found her yelping and stuck in the fence.

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- The puppy made the rounds from person to person, including getting a good looking over by volunteers Jim & Judy Glock. Judy implied she would take Gypsy home if given the chance.

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- 11:34AM - Travis guided Gypsy back up front, via the side entrance and via many curious customers.

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Ryan

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Palmarum

- 11:47AM - Lunch time was approaching so the sales area began to thin out. Jeff helps a customer in the holding area next to a cart filled with a grouping of different Heliconias, Tree Ferns and a pair of Rojo Congo Philodendrons.

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- 11:48AM - Brett and Danielle exit the shadehouse with a cart filled with all sorts of plants.

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- 12:38AM - Don't touch. While trimming a palm, I came upon a Io Moth caterpillar, Automeris io, as it was venturing across the edge of the pot. I made sure to avoid it as it has a mighty sting. Ironically, I was later stung by a Saddleback caterpillar while pulling plants.

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- 2:16PM - It was later in the day and time came to restock plants where we could. It was tough to do, as many size groups were sold out. Volunteer, landscape designer and FM. Tim O'Donnel (kwtimo) carries in a pair of 3 gal. Verschaffeltia splendida to replace those that had sold.

DSC_0351.jpg

Ryan

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Palmarum

Post Tour - Searle Residence

After the first day of the Extravaganza was completed, staff, friends and volunteers made their way over to the Searle homestead. They would get some great food, drink and various different tours of the grounds. It has become a tradition, as Forum members, friends and various plant aficionados have attended in the past. 

- 5:25PM - "What is this thing?" Back at the house and while relaxing on the couch, Travis found a vaporizer belonging to someone and decided to try it out.

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- After a long draw on the device and holding without inhaling it, he spewed it out as a thick, heavy vapor. I forgot what the flavor was supposed to be, but to me it smelled like burnt shoes.

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- Even Michelle liked it.

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- 5:35PM - We were given a rather large Passion Fruit to try so we took it to the house. We cut it open and found out it is very cavernous inside, with a fair amount of sweet, almost tart pulp.

DSC_0363.jpg

Ryan

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Palmarum

- 5:37PM - With drinks in hand, the tour began on the patio. Jim and Jeff look over the ever impressive specimen of Dwarf Betel Nut, Areca catechu cv. 'Dwarf', that resides next to the pool. It is holding a couple batches of seed.

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- 5:40PM - Palms, people, dogs. We made our way across the patio to this Sealing Wax Hybrid, Cyrtostachys sp. 'Hybrid', growing in the corner. It has enjoyed this prime spot ever since it was planted. It loves the full sun and has grown very fast. It was a popular palm during the first Friday as both plants sold out early in the morning. This fact was echoed by Tim, Judy and Jim as they discussed how the palm looks with Jeff. Kylie keeps the dogs, Brindle, Kona and the Glock's dog Belle corralled. 

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- 5:44PM - Within the hybrid complex, the color of the crownshaft, petioles, rachises and trunks vary. Some seem to be more red, a few with little red, and others like this specimen are more orange-red with blotches of yellow mixed with faint striations of light green. The lower part of the leaf sheath tends to be deeper red when first revealed by an older leaf base.

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- For size and color comparison, a Diet Coke can for scale.

DSC_0369.jpg

Ryan

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doranakandawatta

That's a very healthy Cytrostachys renda, isn't it? :)

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Palmarum
12 minutes ago, doranakandawatta said:

That's a very healthy Cytrostachys renda, isn't it? :)

It is the Sealing Wax Hybrid, Cyrtostachys sp. 'Hybrid'. Sometimes you notice the post and reply before I can finish editing it. That is one of the more uniquely colored examples of the Hybrid. I keep trying to get Jeff to attach a name to the Hybrid, but nothing so far. I thought of 'aurantiacus' which means "orange-red" or '-striolatus' or "somewhat striped". Anything is possible at this point.

Ryan

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Palmarum

- 5:46PM - We left the patio and hit the pathways, with no set direction or time-table. You could describe it as 'plant driven wandering' at its finest. I tend to describe the process as a linear trip through the yard, but it often is not like that, as it can be totally random. We walked past this younger Cuban Petticoat Palm, Copernicia macroglossa, on our way east. As we walked by, we noticed the palm held a surprise...

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- ... it was flowering for the first time.

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- 5:48PM - I was informed by Jeff that a flowering tree was in bloom and set off from the group to find it. Which was not hard to do, considering how large and showy these blooms were, like a giant neon sign. This is Saraca cauliflora, with large, rounded flower clusters that emerge off the branches. 

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- The tree was blooming on and off throughout its branches and was growing in the filtered sun, mostly shaded by a nearby grouping of large Bismarck Palms, Bismarckia nobilis.

DSC_0376.jpg

Ryan

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doranakandawatta
24 minutes ago, Palmarum said:

It is the Sealing Wax Hybrid, Cyrtostachys sp. 'Hybrid'. Sometimes you notice the post and reply before I can finish editing it. That is one of the more uniquely colored examples of the Hybrid. I keep trying to get Jeff to attach a name to the Hybrid, but nothing so far. I thought of 'aurantiacus' which means "orange-red" or '-striolatus' or "somewhat striped". Anything is possible at this point.

Ryan

That's a marvel , thanks.
Sorry if I reply too fast, it's so exciting ! Many thanks.

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Palmarum

- 5:49PM - I doubled back to the group to find them in among the land of Copernicias. Steve moves steadily along, as the yard might reach out and grab the crutches. We take a minute to stand in awe of the Copernicia gigas.

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- Jim tries to loosen an old leaf base for the fun of it.

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- 5:50PM - This Copernicia rigida has grown tired of the shade and has leaned over in the attempt to find more sun.

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- 5:51PM - Jeff guided us over to a new area that was recently planted. An area that was once in full sun has become shaded. An assortment of understory palms were planted in the area, including a small grove of Licuala sallehana.

DSC_0380.jpg

Ryan

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doranakandawatta

Nice Licuala sallehana group planting, how old are they?

Or am I wrong?

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Palmarum
8 minutes ago, doranakandawatta said:

Nice Licuala sallehana group planting, how old are they?

Or am I wrong?

You are right, with a note on the one on the far left, which is actually Licuala sallehana var. incisifolia, but I have a better photo of it coming up. They are not fast growing by any means, so those are a few years from a smaller one gallon plant, which was a large, established seedling.

Ryan

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foxtail

OK...OK... Forget Chuck Norris, Mr. Searle is my new super hero!!!

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Tassie_Troy1971

wow what a day - fantastic coverage as always !

 

Troy

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Bill Austin

Thanks Ryan great job once again, I always look forward to this every year and seeing Jeff's incredible garden.

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Palmarum

- 5:51PM - A closer view of one Licuala sallehana, looking down into the crown.

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- The area is still a work in progress so more species are going to be added over time. This highly rare palm is an undescribed species from Papua New Guinea known as Licuala sp. 'Romber'. It has a uniquely-shaped leaf, with six, angled, pleated segments that radiate outward, without a rounded form, almost like a large Rhapis leaf. Perhaps representing the side of Licuala that shares a relationship border with Rhapis.

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- One of my favorites, Licuala bayana. Those leaf blades will get much larger, while keeping the distinctive, 3-segment division; with the center segment being much larger than the other two. It should be grown more, as distribution and population allow.

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- 5:53PM - Tim goes in for a closer inspection of the Licuala sallehana var. incisifolia, the split-leaf variety of the species.

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Ryan

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Palmarum

- 5:54PM - Judy and Belle check out a robust Attalea sp. that looms over the entire area.

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- I think the tag got lost or eaten so the identity is still questionable. I always thought it looked like regular A. cohune. It is hard to take a photo of the entire palm.

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- 5:58PM - A crown shot of an Orania palindan. We picked up the pace as we knew dinner could be ready at any time.

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- 6:00PM - Not every palm grows better in the ground. Some enjoy being containerized and root-bound such as this Johannesteijsmannia perakensis, or Perak Joey, or even 'Joey-on-a-stick'.

DSC_0388.jpg

Ryan

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- 6:03PM - Belle was getting ahead of the group and waiting for us to catch up. We entered Palm Circle, the smaller, contained section of the rarer of the rare in the corner of the yard.

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- A crown view of a Drymophloeus litigiosus, formerly known as D. beguinii. It had a huge, over-sized inflorescence that was right in your face, with heavily-branched rachillae all over the place which were difficult to photograph.

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- 6:08PM - The group moved out of Palm Circle and ventured across the back of the yard heading towards the west side. I hung back to take some photos. When I caught up to the group, they were looking over this colorful croton named 'Thea'. The croton people in attendance were 'ooh'ing and 'ahh'ing' over the amount of color being exhibited. They considered this plant to be a perfect example of what the type cultivar should look like.

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- 6:15PM - Funny. Laughs and commentary so unique to the experience that it is hard to repeat them here.

DSC_0392.jpg

Ryan

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- 6:22PM - The southwest corner of the yard has become a new plot for palms and other exotics. The area was once left open for events, but has been succumbed to the ever increasing demand for planting space. Judy shares a laugh while looking over a mature Lanonia dasyantha.

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- The palm was part of a grouping that was planted not long ago. They have adapted quickly, grown fast and tolerate some serious bright light. This is one inflorescence, of which gender I do not know.

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- The entire palm. Notice the mottling on the newer leaves.

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- A Triangle/Teddy Bear Palm Hybrid, Dypsis decaryi × leptocheilos, gets a gentle rub from Tim. Describing this palm as fast growing is an understatement.

DSC_0396.jpg

Ryan

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    • Palmarum
      By Palmarum
      Searle Brothers Nursery, Inc. & The Rainforest Collection®
      presented...
      The 22nd Annual Fall Extravaganza
      October 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th - 9th, 10th, 11th - 2020
       
      The Few and Far Between - A Palm Sale During the Pandemic
      Unknowns. The unknown elements pertaining to having a plant sale during the pandemic created the most concern. We didn't know what the interest level would be, or if there would be any demand. I figured there would be at-least some need for landscape material, as there always is... as long as there is any urge for homeowners and gardeners to play in the dirt. As for the plant explorers, enthusiasts and collectors, I personally had no idea as to who might show up; and if they did, do they have their list or cart in hand, or would they just be browsing for eye candy? For those who may not know, South Florida has been hit especially hard by the pandemic. So to have both the desire for plants and the urge to travel during the age of Covid-19, is a particular combo.
      The nursery had put every pandemic-related safety measure into place. Signs for social distancing and mask usage, a different entrance pathway for customers entering the sales area, screens and safeguards throughout the checkout process and enough hand sanitizer to sink a ship. Hand washing stations were spaced around the sales area and cleaning materials were used to clean the bathrooms and high-volume surfaces after each use. All we needed then was customers. The 'Ganza was effected by other factors as well. Due to the pandemic, we were short on volunteers that often help during the sale days. These included not only those happy to load a trailer, but those with plant knowledge. To reduce movement through the sales area we had assigned locations during the event. I was positioned at the white tent in the main shadehouse. This factor, along with the intermittent rainfall, greatly reduced the amount of photos I took during the sale.
      Leading up to the sale, I was monitoring the online plant world as much as I could to try and get a feeling as to the 'mood' of plant people. I do this regularly, but I was trying to get an idea of how well the sale might be as a result. The usual amount of communication I had regarding the 'Ganza was way down and those communications I did have had represented a mix of moods, from low to high. I waited to see how this would correspond with customers attending the sale.
       
      Thursday, October 1st
      - 7:41AM - For the first time, the Extravaganza opens on a Thursday morning. This was done to try and maintain social distancing and to help alleviate the crowding that normally occurs on a Friday morning. It didn't work. Most everyone that could attend on a Friday, came Thursday. Plant fanatics follow the credo, 'If they can seek plant, they shall'. It was still early, with the sun fighting to rise among a cloudy sky. The rain was going to play a big part during this already unusual 'Ganza. I took a long gaze down the sidewalk while at the main shadehouse entrance, looking over the Palm selection and anything that might need attention; a fallen plant, a stray hose, etc. Looking to the left (B) the Croton selection was primed and ready for the oncoming onslaught. Hard to make out, but there were 144 different cultivars in there; available in varying amounts.

      - On the right, the Aroid tables were packed with plants of all sorts. (B) The side road had more than its fair share of plant material ready for customers. In addition to the usual spread of Cordylines and ground orchids, there were unusual flowering shrubs, trees and vines. A botanical oddity or two was mixed in for good measure.

      - 7:43AM - Under the barn, the Orchids were on display. They were arranged in their groups, most if not all had a photo of the bloom, if they were not in bloom themselves.

      - 7:47AM - Red leaves everywhere. For some reason, the timing mechanism that controls the newly emerging leaves throughout the Chambeyronia macrocarpa population was in sync. In behind the sidewalk and yellow caution tape, almost every specimen of C. macrocarpa, whether it was a single or multiple, had a new red leaf. It was cool and freaky at the same time. I was not the only one to notice, as the showy leaves waved down customers throughout the first weekend, selling many of the plants in the process.

      Ryan
       
      - Link to For-Sale Topic: The 22nd Annual Fall Extravaganza - For-Sale Topic
      ----- ----- -----
    • Palmarum
      By Palmarum
      Searle Brothers Nursery, Inc. &
      The Rainforest Collection®
      presents...

      The 22nd Annual Fall Plant Extravaganza!
      October 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th – 9th, 10th, 11th - 2020
       
      The upcoming sale is going forward, mostly as usual... with some exceptions and additions. As mentioned on the flyer, all pandemic related conditions will be enforced, including social distancing and the use of masks. Masks will be needed to enter the nursery and need to be worn throughout the sales area. No exceptions. There will be hand sanitizer provided around the sales area, not sure where yet. The Thursday before the first weekend has been turned into a sale day.* This has been done to potentially alleviate the traffic flow on Friday and keep the sales area more spaced out. Certain other elements have been implemented to help keep people spaced apart. More changes and provisions can be made at any time.
      The Searle Brothers Plant Extravaganzas have become exciting plant events and a great way for IPS Members, Palmtalk Forum Members and fellow tropical palm & plant enthusiasts to come together and meet in the South Florida area. The events have always been a great way to spend a weekend (or two) in the company of those who share your passion for gardening and collecting tropical ornamental plants. To describe the events as just mere plant sales would be an understatement; as they have become much more in the form of social events for our friends and family. Forum members, friends and fellow plant collectors have all come from far and wide to attend and we are continuously surprised in the distances they will cover to share in the event. In regards to the following details, I have tried to include as much information about the upcoming Fall 'Ganza as I could. If you see something that you know should be included and it is absent, please post the idea(s) here or contact me, Jeff Searle or the nursery with the methods listed below and let us know...
       
      South Florida Location:
      Searle Brothers Nursery, Inc.
      6640 SW 172nd Avenue
      Southwest Ranches, Florida 33331
      Western Broward County
      *see Map below...

      Fall 2020 Schedule:
      Thursday*, October 1st - 8:00AM - 5:00PM
      Friday, October 2nd - 8:00AM - 5:00PM
      Saturday, October 3rd - 8:00AM - 5:00PM 
      Sunday, October 4th - 9:00AM - 4:00PM
      also, the following weekend...
      Friday, October 9th - 8:00AM - 5:00PM
      Saturday, October 10th - 8:00AM - 5:00PM
      Sunday, October 11th - 9:00AM - 4:00PM
       
      Contact List:
      Nursery Office #: (954) 658-4319 Nursery Fax #: (954) 680-2750
      Jeff Searle: phone #: (954) 658-4317 Email: palms@rainforestcollection.com
      Ryan (Palmarum) Email: palmthetree@yahoo.com or PM me a message through the Forum
       
      Directions:
      The map below is a general street map of western Broward County, Florida showing the location of the nursery (Palm tree symbol). Using Sheridan Street would be the best option to get to the nursery if you are heading west through the area. If you are taking the Florida Turnpike, use the Griffin Road exit from the north, or the Pines Blvd. exit from the south. If you need any additional directions, please contact the nursery, Jeff or I (Ryan). When you get close to the nursery, look for large power lines as they run east and west above the nursery. Parking is along the shoulder of 172nd Avenue in front of, and down the street from, the nursery entrance. If you intend to arrive early before sunrise (and many usually do) be wary of hard-to-see speed bumps along 172nd Avenue and there is a possibility of a speed trap as well. There has been considerable construction along I-75 so the exits near Sheridan Street and Griffin Road have been changed slightly compared to previous years. Express lanes have been added to I-75, they may or may not make the trip faster.


      Plant Availability, Photo Requests:
      For plant availability including a copy of the ever-growing list of palms, cycads and other information regarding which plants and species will be for sale, please contact the nursery, Jeff Searle or I (Ryan). The plant selection process has already begun and will continue right up to the last day before the first morning of the Extravaganza, (sometimes even on the mornings of each event day if the need applies.) The sale lists for palms, cycads and crotons will be made available as soon as they are completed. Special selections might be pulled for sale as requests, but only if the plants are available. There will be certain species, varieties and cultivars that will only be available in limited quantities. These rarer plants will likely sell out quickly in the morning hours, so be sure to arrange your wish list accordingly. Plant groups may have been moved around the sales area, relocated or added in with others. In order to speed your way to your favorite plants please ask a nearby staff member or volunteer as to their location.
      Each plant will be priced with either a lavender tag or will have the price written on the pot and/or on the display card or sign.

      Featured Plant Groups:
      The plant selection at the Extravaganza is constantly growing and changing. The largest and most diverse group is by far the Palms, of which there will be over 300 species available in various different sizes. The plant selection will include genera, species, hybrids, cultivars and varieties representing various plant families from around the world. A large number of Croton cultivars will also be on display as their demand has increased production to new levels. There are always new plants to be added to the selection, as the demand for new, exotic and unusual material remains constant...
      Palms:
      Aroids: - Bromeliads:
      Butterfly Plants: - Cycads: - Crotons:
      Cordylines: - Ferns: - Orchids:
      Heliconias, Gingers and other Zingiber order members: -
      Tropical Flowering Trees, Shrubs, & Vines:
      Succulents & Sansevierias:
      Landscape Ornamentals: - Tropical Fruit Trees:
      Rare and Unusual Exotic Species:
      One-of-a-Kind and Hard-to-Find wonders of the plant world: - … and much more:
      There is always a chance a newly cultivated & recently discovered species of tropical plant will make its way into the sales area.
       
      The Sale Flyer:
      The nursery will soon mail out sale flyers to everyone on our mailing list. If you are on the mailing list and do not receive one, please let Jeff or myself know. In addition, if you would like to be placed on the mailing list for future Extravaganza flyers, please send a message to Jeff or myself with your address.

      Plant Carts:
      We do provide a limited number of carts for customers to use, but it is recommended that you bring your own plant shopping conveyance. The carts do go quickly in the morning of each day, soon after the gates open and during busy periods. During the day when they are returned from the holding area or from the parking lot, they are placed back on the concrete pad across from the register area or near the holding area along the main road.
      Information and Invitation:
      If you need any more details regarding plants, directions, or anything that I have not included above, feel free to contact the nursery, Jeff Searle or myself by the methods listed above. Feel free to post any messages, questions, etc. in this topic. Jeff Searle, I and all the family members and volunteers look forward to meeting everyone including new and familiar Palmtalk Forum members and IPS members at the upcoming Extravaganza. Be sure to find one of us and introduce yourself. You will be sure to find other Forum members at the event as well, possibly walking right past you down an aisle or grabbing for the same plant. The entire Searle family and the mass of volunteers will be waiting to help you find that perfect plant.
      We hope to see you there!
      Ryan
    • Palmarum
      By Palmarum
      Searle Brothers Nursery, Inc. & The Rainforest Collection® presented (barely)...
      The 22nd Annual Spring Plant Extravaganza!
      March 6th, 7th, 8th, - 13th, 14th, 15th - 2020
       
      It is amazing how much of a difference a few weeks can make. A month ago, most of us behind the organization of the Spring 'Ganza were busy pulling plants, setting up sale stuff and otherwise had our noses buried deep in palms. News of the outbreak was still scantly covered in South Florida, with reports stating that it was mostly going on elsewhere, with the activity level at the south end of the state, and of the sale, seemingly unaffected. This was slowly changing during the week leading up to the first sale weekend. We kept one eye on the news and the other on the plants.
      Prior to the Spring Extravaganza, the nursery had attended two very successful plant sales, one in Key West, the other in Ft. Myers. Both events drew heavily on the plant selection and both depleted the selection just as heavily. There were more than enough Palms available for the Spring 'Ganza, but the prior two sales did make a dent in quantity across the Palm family and other plant groups -- namely Crotons, which were a target of many during the two sales (especially in Ft. Myers, which is a Croton haven). There were over 315 Palm taxa (species, varieties, hybrids) available at the opening 'bell' on Friday morning. Some were represented by one size, others as many as five different sizes; from 4-inch to 200 gallon and most sizes in between. Certain taxa were present in the sales area in large numbers or blocks, while others had only a single plant residing on a table, with the duty to hold up its sign by itself. There were of course, a few unlisted specials that didn't make the sale list, but not many. Throughout the sales area, the different sections were packed with material. Every section had new species or varieties. I lost track of how many cards (or signs) were put out, but it was a lot. I ran out of stakes and almost ran out of clips. The total content of material was just about record-breaking for a Spring 'Ganza (except for Crotons).
       
      Friday, March 6th
      - 7:55AM - The morning of the first Friday was a mess from my point of view. I was running way behind schedule by the time I made it to the nursery. I had to make a stop beforehand, which I usually never do, so I was rushing through everything after I squeezed through the gate. As a bonus, as I was heading out the door on my way to the early stop, the news announced that the first cases of COVID-19 had been reported in Florida, at this time it was two cases near Central Florida. The sense of "Oh crap" was carried to the nursery. On my way west through Broward County, I noticed a thick line of dark clouds further to the west, seeming to heading right for the nursery (and the 'Ganza). The sense of "Oh crap" had strengthened to "Oh shit" as I drove faster hoping to beat the rain to the nursery. I had a lot of material with me that could not get wet. I managed to get to the nursery and to the shadehouse's white tent without getting rained upon, as it seemed the rain had shifted to the north somewhat. I rushed to set up the pre-sale stuff the best I could and grabbed my camera to head to the gate. I took a few 'bookend' photos of the area in front of the tent to start the process...

      - Normally, when I have the time, I like to photograph the sidewalk area in the main shadehouse to get an overall look of the Palm selection before it gets attacked. Clean sidewalk, all the Palms in their spots, signs all ready, etc. But this time I had to defer as the sale opening was upon me. I took one shot in front of the tent, showing the Dwarf Betel Nut Palms, Areca catechu var. 'Dwarf', on the left and the Red Sealing Wax Palms, Cyrtostachys renda, on the right. (B) I did an immediate 180º turn, took another photo looking back up the sidewalk and then headed that way. Those red spots in the distance are red shirts belonging to volunteers Judy & Jim Glock. They were going ahead of me to the sales area entrance to greet customers.

      - 7:57AM - I knew I was going to be late to catch the crowd coming in, but I had to try. As I exited the shadehouse and made the turn, Kylie Searle was heading towards me, letting everyone know the customers were coming. We were both moving fast as I took the photo. I kept this shot as it gives an idea of how dark the skies were. They were much darker just ten minutes earlier. (B,C) I reached the holding area and caught a partial crowd making their way to the sales area. Shooting from the hip, I photographed through golf carts to capture Jim Glock greeting customers. The initial crowd through the gate was smaller than usual, but there were a lot of cars parked outside. I figured the dark clouds either kept some in their vehicles or delayed those making their way to the nursery.

      - Like usual, the first group of arriving customers dispersed and headed off in all directions. I turned around and followed a few of the initial customers to the shadehouse entrance. Judy Glock was following them in as well, heading to the Croton section to assist collectors in finding their most wanted cultivars. (B) The shadehouse entrance became a parking lot in seconds. The cloud cover was still apparent as it cut the light to low levels, making a speedy customer, croton-in-hand, blur as he moved to his cart.

       
      A link back to the Spring 'Ganza topic in the For-Sale sub-forum: Spring Extravaganza - For-Sale Topic
      Ryan
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