Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
rprimbs

Dypsis marojejyi?

Recommended Posts

rprimbs

I remember hearing that Dypsis marojejyi is now Dypsis coursii but I notice the Palmpedia still lists Dypsis marojejyi -- but no longer has pictures.  Is there still a Dypsis marojejyi?

Both of my "Dypsis coursii?" died. Has anybody succeeded with them in inland California?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DoomsDave

Well I haven't

but

I'm gonna try!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Josh-O

I had one that had 2 rings of trunk and it up and died 4 yrs ago. I can only imaging how big it would be today. super fussy palm and a tough grow.

on the reverse side I have seen a couple nice specimens growing in Encinitas that are neglected and look fabulous.

location-location-location

I will indeed try again in another part of my yard

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Darold Petty

Can't address the species epithet issue, but I have two plants grown from seedling size.

  They are now large 5-gallon size.  I moved them out of the greenhouse on September 21st to acclimate them for potential ground planting next spring.  So far, the foliage has not suffered any discoloration and the spears continue to enlarge (slowly).  This morning the temperature is 3C / 37F. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
edric

Hi guys, yes there is still a D. marjojeyi, just no photo of it, Ed

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Dypsisdean
16 hours ago, rprimbs said:

I remember hearing that Dypsis marojejyi is now Dypsis coursii but I notice the Palmpedia still lists Dypsis marojejyi -- but no longer has pictures.  Is there still a Dypsis marojejyi?

Both of my "Dypsis coursii?" died. Has anybody succeeded with them in inland California?

As it is with Dypsis - confusion can be the name of the game. While not yet "official," Palmpedia has chosen to list the "Mad Fox" as D. coursii. And all photos previously associated with D. marojejyi are now with D. coursii.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
MattyB

I've had two die, both happened in summer heat

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
LJG

John Dransfield made the call to Coursii at the IPS board meeting in Oct. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tracy

I started with a pair two years ago, immediately after seeing them on a SC Palm Society tour (Bagley garden/Encinitas March 2013).  One of mine died in the pot, same part of the garden as the other a little after a move.  The second is still in a pot, waiting to get planted.  Both had/have extremely weak roots and require stakes to support.  During the summer, mine gets mostly shade mid-day and direct morning light/filtered late afternoon sun.  During this time of year, that part of my garden is full shade, but its still thriving.  Escondido obviously gets a lot hotter during the summer and less humidity than Leucadia or my former home in Carlsbad, so a couple of variables to consider.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Josh-O
8 hours ago, LJG said:

John Dransfeld made the call to Coursii at the IPS board meeting in Oct. 

do you know why he changed the name?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
edric

Hi Josh, the flower was not close enough to marojeji, and to much more like coursii in more ways than could warrant not changing it, this is conjecture on my part, but close I'm sure, here is what Dr. Dransfield had to say in 1995, Ed "This a most distinctive squat robust understory palm, abundant on the broad ridges in submontane forest on Marojejy. It has a short trunk, and leaves that do not fall off neatly, the crown tending to trap litter when young. In this respect it resembles D. perrieri but the leaves, while being about the same size, have grouped pinnae, and rather plumose, and the inflorescence is quite different, being much more diffusely branched. Roots from neighbouring trees tend to grow into the litter that accumulates in the crown, and as the palm grows, these zigzag tree roots continue to grow from sheath to sheath, eventually being exposed. Ferns are also abundant in the crown of this palm. It somewhat resembles D. coursii but has a much more robust stem, with much larger leaves and longer, narrower pinnae. The species name is derived from the type locality, Marojejy. As far as we know, this species is not in cultivation. (J. Dransfield and H. Beentje. 1995)/Palmweb."

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Matt in OC

I have four in the ground, three came from Floribunda a year and a half ago or so. One is in deep shade, two in partial sun, one in half day or more sun. They all seem to love lots of water and the one in full sun got beat up towards the end of summer. We'll see how they do their second full summer.

image.jpeg

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Josh-O
10 hours ago, edric said:

Hi Josh, the flower was not close enough to marojeji, and to much more like coursii in more ways than could warrant not changing it, this is conjecture on my part, but close I'm sure, here is what Dr. Dransfield had to say in 1995, Ed "This a most distinctive squat robust understory palm, abundant on the broad ridges in submontane forest on Marojejy. It has a short trunk, and leaves that do not fall off neatly, the crown tending to trap litter when young. In this respect it resembles D. perrieri but the leaves, while being about the same size, have grouped pinnae, and rather plumose, and the inflorescence is quite different, being much more diffusely branched. Roots from neighbouring trees tend to grow into the litter that accumulates in the crown, and as the palm grows, these zigzag tree roots continue to grow from sheath to sheath, eventually being exposed. Ferns are also abundant in the crown of this palm. It somewhat resembles D. coursii but has a much more robust stem, with much larger leaves and longer, narrower pinnae. The species name is derived from the type locality, Marojejy. As far as we know, this species is not in cultivation. (J. Dransfield and H. Beentje. 1995)/Palmweb."

Thanks for the info Ed. you definatly have answered my question. Thanks :) 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Josh-O
2 hours ago, Matt in OC said:

I have four in the ground, three came from Floribunda a year and a half ago or so. One is in deep shade, two in partial sun, one in half day or more sun. They all seem to love lots of water and the one in full sun got beat up towards the end of summer. We'll see how they do their second full summer.

image.jpeg

looking good! Seeing yours makes me want to try again. I wonder how cold tolerant these are?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...