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RobustaEnvirons

Southern California to lose its Palms!

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RobustaEnvirons

By the way, today I snipped off a little of my W. Robustas dead bark-like material. I just wanted to clean off a little bit, but then before I new it I had pretty much trimmed off all of it. 

Then I thought about whether it could hurt my Robusta. I remember reading you can remove this material, but I didn't know if this is true while it's younger. 

Is this a problem? Will this possibly now hurt my little Robusta? 

I kinda should've just trimmed that little bit off and stopped! Oops, I hope it's not hurt or dies. It's doing quite well, I hope it keeps on going. I didn't cut any living material, just the old leave snippings that have turned into bark material. 

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Palmaceae

It should be ok, but sometimes people can get in the habit of "overcaring" for their plants. Your palm is doing well for growing indoors, you are doing a good job, just leave it growing and just fertilize and water when need. Just try not to overdo it.

 

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Pando

Don't trim them excessively. Washingtonias retain their leaf bases on the trunk for a long time, including the fibers, which protect the trunk. Tearing off the leaves creates open wounds, and your palm can easily get sick and die due to fungus.

Now that you've already done that, there is no way to undo it. Keep the "wounded" area above the soil at all times and completely dry.

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RobustaEnvirons
31 minutes ago, Pando said:

Don't trim them excessively. Washingtonias retain their leaf bases on the trunk for a long time, including the fibers, which protect the trunk. Tearing off the leaves creates open wounds, and your palm can easily get sick and die due to fungus.

Now that you've already done that, there is no way to undo it. Keep the "wounded" area above the soil at all times and completely dry.

Shoot, sorry. I guess I goofed up. I was just trying to clean it up a little. Somebody on YouTube cleaned their mature Robusta of all its leaf bases and fibers. It looked really clean, so that was what my goal was. I guess I should've just left well enough alone. All that work into it too! 

I'll do as you say and hopefully it doesn't decline. Thank you for the help. 

Edited by RobustaEnvirons

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RobustaEnvirons
37 minutes ago, Palmaceae said:

It should be ok, but sometimes people can get in the habit of "overcaring" for their plants. Your palm is doing well for growing indoors, you are doing a good job, just leave it growing and just fertilize and water when need. Just try not to overdo it.

 

Thank you, I try to care for it. Sometimes I think I do overcare for it a little bit. It's not seemed to mind growing in my bay window despite the NW Ohio winter clouds. I'm quite proud of it. It's new frond gets bigger and bigger everyday. Everyday after I get home from work I look to see how much bigger the new frond has gotten. 

When (and how) do I fertilize it? What should I buy? Do you add fertilizer when you water it? Is it a liquid? I actually didn't know I had to fertilize it! Still learning. 

I don't water it too often. I've laid off the watering since its a dessert Palm (I can tend to overwater a little). I last watered it on November 13th. It's been great. 

 

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Pando

Don't feel bad, I think most of us have done that at some point. A few months ago I lost a Dypsis saintelucei "dwarf" probably due to a premature leaf pull. A month later it just declined and died within a week, and I can't buy a replacement because they just aren't available.

Trimming a mature Washy is a whole different matter, as you're dealing with a trunk that's 2 feet across and plenty of wood on the trunk, plus the growing point is 30 feet above the area being trimmed. It's purely done for cosmetic reasons, but even then it takes care and practice to do that.

 

andalusian-older-man-palm-tree-pruned-by

Edited by Pando
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RobustaEnvirons
7 minutes ago, Pando said:

Don't feel bad, I think most of us have done that at some point. A few months ago I lost a Dypsis saintelucei "dwarf" probably due to a premature leaf pull. A month later it just declined and died within a week, and I can't buy a replacement because they just aren't available.

Trimming a mature Washy is a whole different matter, as you're dealing with a trunk that's 2 feet across and plenty of wood on the trunk, plus the growing point is 30 feet above the area being trimmed. It's purely done for cosmetic reasons, but even then it takes care and practice to do that.

 

andalusian-older-man-palm-tree-pruned-by

I'm definitely not doing that again! I didn't know it was that serious. I figured they were like dead material and they didn't need them once brown. I'll just leave it be from now on.

So, your palm died because you pulled off one of its leaves earlier than it should? That bites though. And they don't sell them online? EBay, Amazon? What would be the recommended way of cleaning off dying leaves, wait until they drop off?

Edited by RobustaEnvirons
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Pando
9 minutes ago, RobustaEnvirons said:

So, your palm died because you pulled off one of its leaves earlier than it should? That bites though. And they don't sell them online? EBay, Amazon? What would be the recommended way of cleaning off dying leaves, wait until they drop off?

Yes, that's correct. It created an open wound where the pathogens found the way in and rotted the growing point.

For a washy you wait until the bottom leaves start turning brown and then you cut them off, leaving the leaf base attached to the palm (you can see the old leaf bases on the picture above). In the wild the palm retains the old leaves as a skirt for a long time, until it gets to 30-40ft and then starts dropping them. Most palms with crownshafts (like King palms) will clean themselves and drop the leaves when ready.

Also, don't fertilize it! That's a sure way to kill a seedling if you are not doing it correctly. Just add a bit of water if the soil is dry, but not too much!. They love to be neglected - remember they grow in sand/gravel in cracks on the freeway median.

 

Edited by Pando

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RobustaEnvirons
1 hour ago, Pando said:

Yes, that's correct. It created an open wound where the pathogens found the way in and rotted the growing point.

For a washy you wait until the bottom leaves start turning brown and then you cut them off, leaving the leaf base attached to the palm (you can see the old leaf bases on the picture above). In the wild the palm retains the old leaves as a skirt for a long time, until it gets to 30-40ft and then starts dropping them. Most palms with crownshafts (like King palms) will clean themselves and drop the leaves when ready.

Also, don't fertilize it! That's a sure way to kill a seedling if you are not doing it correctly. Just add a bit of water if the soil is dry, but not too much!. They love to be neglected - remember they grow in sand/gravel in cracks on the freeway median.

 

Wow, okay no problem. I won't fertilize it. I'll just leave it to its own devices. I'm glad you told me, or I might've. Thanks. When will I know I need to water it? I watered it last on Nov 13th. I've been trying to ease off watering it so much as we've had a gnat problem (in the living room where it's at) and also I worried about root rot. When I first got it, I watered it every week (25oz more or less), now I figured I'd see if I could go a long while to dry out the soil and kill the gnats. We've also been spraying for them in the house to get rid of them. 

I figured since its a dessert Palm I don't need to water that often. Are there ways to tell if it needs water? Such as the leaf tips turn brown or something else? 

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Brad Mondel

Let him dry out slightly between waterings, this is a desert Palm and you have to take into account it's natural ecosystem. Do not remove leaf bases, only dead fronds. Cut the frond's petiole (stem) above the leaf base. Do not skin the palm or love him to death. Remember plants need room to grow and space just like a relationship! Hope I helped out some. 

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RobustaEnvirons
25 minutes ago, Brad Mondel said:

Let him dry out slightly between waterings, this is a desert Palm and you have to take into account it's natural ecosystem. Do not remove leaf bases, only dead fronds. Cut the frond's petiole (stem) above the leaf base. Do not skin the palm or love him to death. Remember plants need room to grow and space just like a relationship! Hope I helped out some. 

Thank you that was helpful, I'll remember that then.

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John Case
6 hours ago, Pando said:

Don't feel bad, I think most of us have done that at some point. A few months ago I lost a Dypsis saintelucei "dwarf" probably due to a premature leaf pull. A month later it just declined and died within a week, and I can't buy a replacement because they just aren't available.

Trimming a mature Washy is a whole different matter, as you're dealing with a trunk that's 2 feet across and plenty of wood on the trunk, plus the growing point is 30 feet above the area being trimmed. It's purely done for cosmetic reasons, but even then it takes care and practice to do that.

 

andalusian-older-man-palm-tree-pruned-by

Trimming a washie like this is an abomination......

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RobustaEnvirons
1 minute ago, John Case said:

Trimming a washie like this is an abomination......

Why do you say that? You just don't like the way they look when trimmed?

 

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John Case
Just now, RobustaEnvirons said:

Why do you say that? You just don't like the way they look when trimmed?

 

First, it is not natural, second, the reddish hue lasts only a short time, and third, it think it may provide easier access for disease. I see more and more of this in my area and it just looks wrong. Same for Trachycarpus, which has started around here as well.

BTW, hoping to get your seeds tomorrow.

 

JC

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RobustaEnvirons
8 minutes ago, John Case said:

First, it is not natural, second, the reddish hue lasts only a short time, and third, it think it may provide easier access for disease. I see more and more of this in my area and it just looks wrong. Same for Trachycarpus, which has started around here as well.

BTW, hoping to get your seeds tomorrow.

 

JC

Oh, well that does make sense then. I think you're right though, if trimmed the diseases could just waltz right in. I think I read though, that once W.Robusta ages enough they shed their leaf skirt, leaf bases, and fibers. When I see pictures of tall-old Robusta in California, they seem skirt-less, smooth and clean. So could it be that this trimming is not actually harmful?

And, thank you very much for the seeds and all the work collecting. I appreciate it. 

Edited by RobustaEnvirons

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John Case
1 minute ago, RobustaEnvirons said:

Oh, well that does make sense then. I think you're right though, if trimmed the diseases could just waltz right in. I think I read though, that once W.Robusta ages enough they shed their leaf skirt, leaf bases, and fibers. When I see pictures of tall-old Robusta in California, they seem skirt-less, smooth and clean. So could it be that this trimming is not actually harmful?

And, thank you very much for the seeds and all the work collecting. I appreciate it. 

They do shed naturally, usually many years after their death and hang on for quite a while. Tree trimmers who climb high onto the trunk to remove the 'skirt' have been known to be killed as they are crushed under many pounds of leaves that break loose and hang.

Although I am not a fan of these palms, I do prefer the skirt to be left on, and to clean up once it sheds. Of course, if there are plants under it they will be damaged or killed by the falling leaves. That is one reason why some people remove them annually or semi-annually. Believe me, this has escalated into a religious argument in other threads.

JC

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RobustaEnvirons
10 minutes ago, John Case said:

They do shed naturally, usually many years after their death and hang on for quite a while. Tree trimmers who climb high onto the trunk to remove the 'skirt' have been known to be killed as they are crushed under many pounds of leaves that break loose and hang.

Although I am not a fan of these palms, I do prefer the skirt to be left on, and to clean up once it sheds. Of course, if there are plants under it they will be damaged or killed by the falling leaves. That is one reason why some people remove them annually or semi-annually. Believe me, this has escalated into a religious argument in other threads.

JC

Ok, that's cool. I just wondering. I wish I hadn't trimmed my little Robusta now. I had no idea it was a big thing. I just foolishly thought, "Oh, maybe I can just trim it up a little". I'll be on seats-end hoping it doesn't decline and die.

So you don't like W.Robusta? I think its probably the most grown palm in California? Its synonymous with California and warm climates.  

Personally, its my favorite palm. But, everyone has their favorite. I also like Trachycarpus Fortunei, and CIDP. Trachycarpus Fortunei was my first palm ever trying to grow. I grew it next to a south facing window in my bedroom. I bought it on ebay and had it going a whole year. I accidentally killed it by over-watering it, it had root-rot. 

Edited by RobustaEnvirons

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John Case
Just now, RobustaEnvirons said:

Ok, that's cool. I just wondering. I wish I hadn't trimmed my little Robusta now. I had no idea it was a big thing. I just foolishly thought, "Oh, maybe I can just trim it up a little". I'll be on seats-end hoping it doesn't decline and die.

So you don't like W.Robusta? I think its probably the most grown palm in California?     

Statistics can be deceiving....most self planted for sure,....few people ask for them. On any given day, I could dig up 10 small ones and be paid for removing them. Commercial or governmental plantings are often CIDPs. Queens have become a plague on the landscape because they grow so easily here, although most of them look bad because they have a large water (we are in a drought) and fertilizer (the average homeowner ,does not mange these demanding trees at all. Once a Queen starts seeding is when the trouble starts.....I get lots of calls from clients and neighbors of client wanting to know how they can get rid of them (many think they can sell them, but there is no market for Queen palms here). They can be beautiful and scream the tropical look, but there are so many better choices.

This is merely a reflection of where I live......in your area, this is not the case.

JC 

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RobustaEnvirons
11 minutes ago, John Case said:

Statistics can be deceiving....most self planted for sure,....few people ask for them. On any given day, I could dig up 10 small ones and be paid for removing them. Commercial or governmental plantings are often CIDPs. Queens have become a plague on the landscape because they grow so easily here, although most of them look bad because they have a large water (we are in a drought) and fertilizer (the average homeowner ,does not mange these demanding trees at all. Once a Queen starts seeding is when the trouble starts.....I get lots of calls from clients and neighbors of client wanting to know how they can get rid of them (many think they can sell them, but there is no market for Queen palms here). They can be beautiful and scream the tropical look, but there are so many better choices.

This is merely a reflection of where I live......in your area, this is not the case.

JC 

Well, I can understand why you're sick of them. Your around them all the time. And it sounds like you work around them everyday; landscaping? 

I just love them, but I don't see them all over and they are considered "Exotic" around here. So I can see it your way. Like you said its not the case in my area.  

Edited by RobustaEnvirons

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John Case
22 minutes ago, RobustaEnvirons said:

Well, I can understand why you're sick of them. Your around them all the time. And it sounds like you work around them everyday; landscaping? 

I just love them, but I don't see them all over and they are considered "Exotic" around here. So I can see it your way. Like you said its not the case in my area.  

The gardening aspect of my life is an avocation. I am a Real Estate Broker...by trade.

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RobustaEnvirons
Just now, John Case said:

The gardening aspect of my life is an avocation. I am a Real Estate Broker...by trade.

Oh, haha, sorry. You talked about clients calling you about the Queen palms and I assumed Landscaping. Oops. 

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Ben in Norcal
58 minutes ago, John Case said:

Statistics can be deceiving....most self planted for sure,....few people ask for them. On any given day, I could dig up 10 small ones and be paid for removing them. Commercial or governmental plantings are often CIDPs. Queens have become a plague on the landscape because they grow so easily here, although most of them look bad because they have a large water (we are in a drought) and fertilizer (the average homeowner ,does not mange these demanding trees at all. Once a Queen starts seeding is when the trouble starts.....I get lots of calls from clients and neighbors of client wanting to know how they can get rid of them (many think they can sell them, but there is no market for Queen palms here). They can be beautiful and scream the tropical look, but there are so many better choices.

This is merely a reflection of where I live......in your area, this is not the case.

JC 

I was with you until the "so many better choices" part.  If your need for them is as mine - i.e. the need for fast-growing canopy that is basically bulletproof in our area - this may well be the ONLY choice.  Parajubaea and mules are significantly slower; Archontophoenix isn't exactly bulletproof.  I have long pondered what other "fast canopy" palms we have available to us, but most often drawn a blank.  What have I not considered?

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John Case
13 hours ago, Ben in Norcal said:

I was with you until the "so many better choices" part.  If your need for them is as mine - i.e. the need for fast-growing canopy that is basically bulletproof in our area - this may well be the ONLY choice.  Parajubaea and mules are significantly slower; Archontophoenix isn't exactly bulletproof.  I have long pondered what other "fast canopy" palms we have available to us, but most often drawn a blank.  What have I not considered?

I am confident you have not missed anything, Ben. I look for palms that can handle the heat and cold in East County for me in particular and friends who live out here. Despite how close we are to each other as the crow flies, our conditions can be vastly different, especially when it is very cold or very hot. At the extremes here, we are much more like the San Joaquin Valley than Contra Costa County. A few folks out here have some oak canopy (mainly Blue Oak) which gives them the canopy but also has the downside of water, Blue Oaks require no water during summer, or the roots rot and the tree comes crashing down; the live oaks in your area can take summer water much better.

Butia, Brahea, Parajubaea, (if placed properly), Trithrinax,  Chamerops, Phoenix and, of course, Beccariophoenix, provide a pretty good selection for the average gardener out here. Once some canopy is established, then the Chamaedorea, Dypsis, and many others, can be considered. Additionally, even a Ravenea rivularis can live (not thrive though) out here.

I am certain I missed something as the coffee has not yet kicked in.

JC

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Ben in Norcal
7 hours ago, John Case said:

I am confident you have not missed anything, Ben. I look for palms that can handle the heat and cold in East County for me in particular and friends who live out here. Despite how close we are to each other as the crow flies, our conditions can be vastly different, especially when it is very cold or very hot. At the extremes here, we are much more like the San Joaquin Valley than Contra Costa County. A few folks out here have some oak canopy (mainly Blue Oak) which gives them the canopy but also has the downside of water, Blue Oaks require no water during summer, or the roots rot and the tree comes crashing down; the live oaks in your area can take summer water much better.

Butia, Brahea, Parajubaea, (if placed properly), Trithrinax,  Chamerops, Phoenix and, of course, Beccariophoenix, provide a pretty good selection for the average gardener out here. Once some canopy is established, then the Chamaedorea, Dypsis, and many others, can be considered. Additionally, even a Ravenea rivularis can live (not thrive though) out here.

I am certain I missed something as the coffee has not yet kicked in.

JC

All of those are rooted in here, as you know. Except for the R. riv.  Finding one sun-acclimated has been a challenge, which is why I am on your wait list. ;)

I guess the other ones worthy of mention (and which I originally neglected) are some of the hybrids; JxS and BxP seem at least as fast as queens, so hopefully they will also help me with canopy for my jungle!

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RobustaEnvirons

Just came across these beautiful Washingtonia Robusta in Indialantic, Florida! Surfing Google Maps I came upon these. I'm surprised because I don't normally see skirted Washies in Florida due to the high winds probably. I love how they're all planted in a row and they're of decent height too! They're all growing so well and vibrant. This is considered Subtropical, and these Washies no doubt receive a lot of rain. So I'm excited to see them growing very nicely since they're a desert palm from Sonora Mexico.   

Palm Bay US-192 Washingtonia Robusta 5- copy.JPG

Palm Bay US-192 Washingtonia Robusta 3.JPG

Palm Bay US-192 Washingtonia Robusta 4 - Copy.JPG

Palm Bay US-192 Washingtonia Robusta 2 - Copy.JPG

Palm Bay US-192 Washingtonia Robusta 6 - Copy.JPG

Edited by RobustaEnvirons
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Mr.SamuraiSword

California would be less appealing without those tall washingtonias.  But here on the east coast, Sabal Palmettos can get around the same hight.  They just take twice as long to get there!  here are some I saw in South Carolina.  In florida I saw some wild ones Near Inverness around Fort Island Beach and they were as tall as the photos above.  If I find the photos I will share them.  I am just tired of people thinking Palmettos Dont grow tall like washingtonas

Giant Sabal Palms.jpg

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DoomsDave
On 12/7/2015, 11:42:23, Pando said:

Don't feel bad, I think most of us have done that at some point. A few months ago I lost a Dypsis saintelucei "dwarf" probably due to a premature leaf pull. A month later it just declined and died within a week, and I can't buy a replacement because they just aren't available.

Trimming a mature Washy is a whole different matter, as you're dealing with a trunk that's 2 feet across and plenty of wood on the trunk, plus the growing point is 30 feet above the area being trimmed. It's purely done for cosmetic reasons, but even then it takes care and practice to do that.

 

andalusian-older-man-palm-tree-pruned-by

Is that an alamy stock photo? :innocent:

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DoomsDave
On 12/7/2015, 1:33:27, RobustaEnvirons said:

Wow, okay no problem. I won't fertilize it. I'll just leave it to its own devices. I'm glad you told me, or I might've. Thanks. When will I know I need to water it? I watered it last on Nov 13th. I've been trying to ease off watering it so much as we've had a gnat problem (in the living room where it's at) and also I worried about root rot. When I first got it, I watered it every week (25oz more or less), now I figured I'd see if I could go a long while to dry out the soil and kill the gnats. We've also been spraying for them in the house to get rid of them. 

I figured since its a dessert Palm I don't need to water that often. Are there ways to tell if it needs water? Such as the leaf tips turn brown or something else? 

(A little late, like often . . . )

I concur with Pando. Be a good palm dad, but not a helicopter palm dad (from a recovering Jewish Palm Mother, Helicopter Dad, etc.)

Gnats in the soil feed on fungus, which is from watering too much. We had a terrible problem with that in our indoor plantscape in the Dark Tower. (The !@#$%! gnats love to swarm near the computer screens, then fly up your nose! URK!) Our professional plant guys give the plants just enough water to drink, but not so much the soil stays wet. The gnat problem is over.

Don't spray your house for fungus gnats! The Housekeeper of Doom will have a very, very tight fit! You can get special fungicide in a nursery that can treat fungus in the soil. Or, you can use bug killer on the soil in the pots. (Sorry didn't mean to shout. I'm hoping this will help others, as well as you.)

Before watering, wait till the soil is dry, but not bone-dry. Then give just enough of a drink to wet it a bit. Speed up growth rates by watering a bit more often. Fast Washies in the house are a mixed blessing.

You're the Man for growing plants in the house! People think it's easy, but it's often not. (I don't have any indoor potted palms right now. The dozens outside keep me plenty busy.)

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cm05
4 hours ago, Mr.SamuraiSword said:

California would be less appealing without those tall washingtonias.  But here on the east coast, Sabal Palmettos can get around the same hight.  They just take twice as long to get there!  here are some I saw in South Carolina.  In florida I saw some wild ones Near Inverness around Fort Island Beach and they were as tall as the photos above.  If I find the photos I will share them.  I am just tired of people thinking Palmettos Dont grow tall like washingtonas

Giant Sabal Palms.jpg

My original favorite palm, the palm that got me interested in palms. I love seeing skyduster palmettos with full 360 degree crowns. They're just so slow. I'd never try one from seed, I don't have the patience lol. My Washingtonia is only 12 months old and actually looks like a small palm, not a blade of grass.

I wish someone could create a form that grows as fast as Washingtonia (or faster), and maybe with the cold tolerance of a Sabal minor.

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Tracy
On 12/7/2015, 6:35:23, John Case said:

Statistics can be deceiving....most self planted for sure,....few people ask for them. On any given day, I could dig up 10 small ones and be paid for removing them.

I'm trying to stay ahead of the game.  My neighbor has 2 very tall W robusta next to the fence which drop seed into my yard when the winds blow.  A non palm person would think I have wild grass growing behind my garage, but it is just the robusta seeds sprouting.  I pull as many robusta seedlings out as I do weeds, it's a continual battle.  I was out picking up after my dog, and got distracted for a couple of minutes and had this harvest, with plenty left behind for the weekend.20160603-104A2232.thumb.jpg.b0960866facf

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Tracy
On 12/7/2015, 7:36:12, Ben in Norcal said:

 If your need for them is as mine - i.e. the need for fast-growing canopy that is basically bulletproof in our area - this may well be the ONLY choice.

While they aren't native to California, they certainly have established here from the south like a native.  It got me thinking about how some of the bird species are migrating further north.  I'm not sure if the Hooded Oriole is a newcomer to California (historically speaking) or a longtimer.  They nest on the undersides of W robusta leaf's.  They are very colorful, and we look forward to their return every summer to nest in my neighbors trees.  Not sure if they travel up to the Central Valley and Bay Area, but I don't recall seeing them when I was living in the Bay Area decades ago.  At my place of business we have endangered species and "birds of interest" which nest on the levees between our salt concentrating ponds.  In the last 50 years some birds have arrived from Baja California to nest, which previously had not been this far north.  So perhaps as things like W robusta become "native" to our habitat, we will continue seeing other species migrating further north.  This Oriole was perched on my neighbor's robusta  that donates so many seeds to my garden.5752d60e5319e_20150601-LI9A0884HoodedOri

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Brad Mondel

It's funny that you guys are ripping your seedlings out like weeds when I'm trying to baby some seedlings grown from L.A seeds. I've collected seeds from across the country and so far these sprouted and some red yucca from Vegas. 

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PalmTreeDude

In warm areas of California (mainly 9a or higher) Majesty Palms (normally indoor palms) get HUGE and look amazing!

Some majesty's in CA (pictures not mine).

image.png

image.png

 

And over time time these things get sooooo tall! They almost look like coconut palms.

Edited by PalmTreeDude
Added Pictures
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Sandy Loam

Not to stray too far from the subject of Washingtonia Robusta, but I too have noticed a lot of Majesty Palms (ravenea rivularis) in California.  I was surprised to see them thriving in such a dry climate because they are reputed to need a lot of water. 

 

I have only seen Majesty Palms in southern California, though - zones 10a, 10b and 11 -- never in zone 9a or 9b. 

Surprisingly, here in our wet Florida climate, majesty palms are not very common.  They are the cheapest and most commonly sold trees at "big box" nurseries here, but I only occasionally see them planted in central and southern Florida where they thrive. 

Back to Washingtonia Robusta, I keep seeing more and more of them dying from whatever disease or fungus has been attacking them for the past two-three years here.  I don't know whether it is the same fusarium wilt that is killing the washingtonias in Los Angeles (the original topic of this thread). I have not noticed a fusarium pattern on the dying washingtonias here (leaves half-green/half-nectrotic, with healthy growth surviving at the spear area until close to death, and older fronds dying first). Here, whatever attacks the washingtonia robusta is pretty sudden and turns the whole crown black/brown/dead-looking without killing one half of the fronds first.

 

 

 

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Ben in Norcal
8 hours ago, Sandy Loam said:

Not to stray too far from the subject of Washingtonia Robusta, but I too have noticed a lot of Majesty Palms (ravenea rivularis) in California.  I was surprised to see them thriving in such a dry climate because they are reputed to need a lot of water. 

 

I have only seen Majesty Palms in southern California, though - zones 10a, 10b and 11 -- never in zone 9a or 9b. 

Surprisingly, here in our wet Florida climate, majesty palms are not very common.  They are the cheapest and most commonly sold trees at "big box" nurseries here, but I only occasionally see them planted in central and southern Florida where they thrive. 

 

You'll see Majesties up here even in street plantings, occasionally...9b/10a climates...though when water deprived they don't look great.  They get to trunking stage though so with a little more care I'd imagine they'd do acceptably.

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Tracy
8 hours ago, Sandy Loam said:

Back to Washingtonia Robusta, I keep seeing more and more of them dying from whatever disease or fungus has been attacking them for the past two-three years here.  I don't know whether it is the same fusarium wilt that is killing the washingtonias in Los Angeles (the original topic of this thread).

I did a quick search on fusarium wilt transmission, and came up with articles on its effects on bananas, but also a good article from the University of Florida IFAS Extension, specifically on Fusarium wilt in W robusta and S romanzoffiana.  The publication attributes both to the same fusarium strain.  Transmission through both contaminated pruning tools, and possibly windborn spores.  Its their Publication#PP278 if you are interested.  While I'm aware of fusarium's presence here in southern California, W robusta and S romanzoffiana don't seem to be dying on a wholesale basis.  If I look at the skyline both are still present in abundance, as well as seeding like mad.  Perhaps climate plays a roll in the fusarium spread by wind blown spores, so that it is a bigger problem in Florida than here?

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Josh-O
2 hours ago, Tracy said:

I did a quick search on fusarium wilt transmission, and came up with articles on its effects on bananas, but also a good article from the University of Florida IFAS Extension, specifically on Fusarium wilt in W robusta and S romanzoffiana.  The publication attributes both to the same fusarium strain.  Transmission through both contaminated pruning tools, and possibly windborn spores.  Its their Publication#PP278 if you are interested.  While I'm aware of fusarium's presence here in southern California, W robusta and S romanzoffiana don't seem to be dying on a wholesale basis.  If I look at the skyline both are still present in abundance, as well as seeding like mad.  Perhaps climate plays a roll in the fusarium spread by wind blown spores, so that it is a bigger problem in Florida than here?

interesting observation Tracy!!:greenthumb:

although Canary dates are going down fast due to the disease :( 

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Tracy
11 hours ago, Josh-O said:

interesting observation Tracy!!:greenthumb:

although Canary dates are going down fast due to the disease :( 

I have to suspect that CIDP's are more likely to be pruned here in private gardnes than most W robusta or Syagrus.  Transmission through contaminated pruning gear probably being the primary transmission route.  W robusta and S romanzoffiana being so common and growing like weeds, no one prunes them until they get so large that the dropping foliage becomes a problem, so relatively infrequent unless in a commercial property setting.  This is an impression, as opposed to a documented analysis of the spread of the disease I admit. 

Ironically, after posting this morning, a pair of Hooded Orioles off my kitchen window were pulling off strands from my banana plant leaves to build a nest.  It's nesting season, so while I'm pulling the seedlings, I still appreciate my neighbors good ole Washington robustas... a So Cal tradition!  Glad they are in their yard and not mine though.

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Josh-O
Just now, Tracy said:

I have to suspect that CIDP's are more likely to be pruned here in private gardnes than most W robusta or Syagrus.  Transmission through contaminated pruning gear probably being the primary transmission route.  W robusta and S romanzoffiana being so common and growing like weeds, no one prunes them until they get so large that the dropping foliage becomes a problem, so relatively infrequent unless in a commercial property setting.  This is an impression, as opposed to a documented analysis of the spread of the disease I admit. 

Ironically, after posting this morning, a pair of Hooded Orioles off my kitchen window were pulling off strands from my banana plant leaves to build a nest.  It's nesting season, so while I'm pulling the seedlings, I still appreciate my neighbors good ole Washington robustas... a So Cal tradition!  Glad they are in their yard and not mine though.

I love washies too. I carve lots of tikis out of them :) 

 

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Josh-O
3 minutes ago, Josh-O said:

I love washies too. I carve lots of tikis out of them :) 

 

here are a few of the tikis I have carved over the years out of washie stumps.

IMG_3579.thumb.JPG.f5290538369e9545737e7IMG_6229.thumb.JPG.16fed698526aea902db73IMG_5625.thumb.JPG.b94bc99a251a0dd7afedbIMG_5295.thumb.JPG.9942a91f6895495acdad1IMG_4729.thumb.JPG.5bfebe95d470b86e2e49d

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