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Pal Meir

Juvenile Trachycarpus wagnerianus at 50°N

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Pal Meir

The two Waggies are growing very slooowly, but they are growing,  despite the missing summer …

578a8ba424de9_Twagner2016-07-15P1020175.

578a8bac3959d_Twagner2016-07-15P1020174.

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Hamal

Pal, I feel that most of my Trachycarpus palms do much better during this wet, slightly cooler summer than during a hot and dry summer. On the other hand, Butia, Jubaea and Brahea seem to prefer more sun and less rain than we have had in Germany this year.

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Henoh

Hamal, I have same observation here in inland Croatia.When temperatures range between 35-40 Celsius for more than few days T.wagnerianus start with sunburns on leaves but enjoy cooler and wetter Summer.

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Pal Meir
1 hour ago, Hamal said:

Pal, I feel that most of my Trachycarpus palms do much better during this wet, slightly cooler summer than during a hot and dry summer. On the other hand, Butia, Jubaea and Brahea seem to prefer more sun and less rain than we have had in Germany this year.

 

25 minutes ago, Henoh said:

Hamal, I have same observation here in inland Croatia.When temperatures range between 35-40 Celsius for more than few days T.wagnerianus start with sunburns on leaves but enjoy cooler and wetter Summer.

The two Waggies in Heidelberg are growing under the canopy of two taller trees, a maple and a yew, so they don’t get direct sun during summer. And even in hotter summers like the last one in 2015 the humidity was quite high. The biggest problems were long and dry snow-free freezes like in February 2012 (with temps below -15°C) after a warm January (with over +20°C), which killed one of the former Waggies.

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Jungle Jas.

Hi all,

 Here in the UK Waggies are virtually bomb proof, however I managed to kill one in the winter of 2010,   I had one in a pot which had a 1 meter trunk. I couldn't  decide were to plant it so I left it in the pot over winter ready to plant out in spring! That winter was severe for the UK, with a low of -8c (normally -5C were I live) . The temperature was not the problem waggies would normally go well below that, but the temperature didn't rise above freezing for 2 weeks and that was enough to kill the roots. It saved me the trouble of deciding were to plant it come the spring!:violin::violin::violin:

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Pal Meir

Growing slowly, but looking healthy :), nine years unprotected in ground planted as a four years old bonsai seedling:

57aa1f04c4633_Twagner2016-08-08P1020505.

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Flow

That is really slow. But it looks healthy.

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Pal Meir

At the other one (in ground since 2014) last winter left some slight traces on the newest leaf:

57ab5c40283b9_Twagner2016-08-08P1020499.

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Pal Meir

Last Monday I visited Heidelberg:

57d071c055243_Twagner2016-09-05P10207383

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Pal Meir

Growth of 2½ years (March 2014 to Sept. 2016):

57d084d6686c4_TwagnerR2014-03-082016-09-

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PalmTreeDude

Slow grower, but looks healthy! I heard if you plant a palm, from seed into the ground in early spring, once the palm pops up and grows more it is a little more hardier. I know someone planted Sabal palmetto seeds straight into the ground in Delaware and after the winter the little sprouts were not fazed at all! 

Edited by PalmTreeDude
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Keith in SoJax

Palms in hostile climate, that's always nice to see.  Record lows there are quite cool in summer, that was something I didn't know.

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Pal Meir
11 hours ago, Keith in SoJax said:

Palms in hostile climate, that's always nice to see.  Record lows there are quite cool in summer, that was something I didn't know.

When you look only at the average temps of a German city like e.g. Hamburg (53.5°N) you could plant there not only Trachycarpus and Chamaerops, but also Butia, Jubaea, and most Phoenix palms. But when you see the maxima (37.3°C/99.1°F) and minima (-29.1°C/-20.4°F) you will understand that it is not possible to keep a palm in ground for more than one or two winters. (Even in June you may have problems with minima 0.6°C/33.1°F.)

57d2ac5b7aff9_HamburgClimate.thumb.jpg.5

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Flow

Here's mine, I hope you don't mind my showing it here. I have never really looked up my coordinates but apparently we are at 47°N.
It has grown well even though the first half of the year was complete s**t, many farmers lost much of their crops due to adverse conditions (much too cold and too wet). However, the waggy has put out 11 leaves so far. I am very satisfied with it.

IMG_3424.thumb.jpg.905ac55fc83ac42c0a769

It stands below a maple tree and it's growing towards the light. From the other side it looks like this:

IMG_3427.thumb.jpg.a19734f2b1389aabf2aec

 

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Phoenikakias
On 19/6/2016, 9:45:50, Pal Meir said:

Welcome to Germany! — The problem in Freiburg is the same as everywhere in Germany: The average low temps would allow to plant Trachys in ground even in Hamburg, but the record lows (which come relatively often without protecting snow lasting many days or weeks) would kill their roots and meristem.

5766e757efdcb_FreiburgClimate.thumb.jpg.

Try Trachycarpus fortunei cultivar Bulgaria. 'Relatively often' how often is it? If it is evry 10 or more years you can use Trachies as kinda perennials. 

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Pal Meir

Not so cold yet, only -9°C/16°F minima so far …

587fa34cd9c23_P103029496.thumb.jpg.4cd1d

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Kai

Pal, the Trachies that are planted out as small as yours, become the best looking ones by far when they grow up! I can allready see the beauty your wagnerianus is becoming!

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Jimhardy

Nice Waggie...some of these are incredibly tough palms...

I may be digging mine out in spring

if I can find a new place,probably the last year

that I will have a chance as its getting bigger.

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Pal Meir

No damages during winter 2016/17: :)

5905dc928c324_Twagner2017-04-26P10304995

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Flow

Looking good. We had very long freezes here but still the waggy was unscathed. My T. ukhrulensis and princeps hybrid were damaged and spear-pulled.

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Pal Meir

Pushing new spears after a rather chilly spring: :)

593aa7a9e0451_Twagner2017-06-02P10306626

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Pal Meir

Growth within 3 years (the arrow marks the same leaf):

596a0354d9eae_Twagner2017-07vs2014-07P10

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Pal Meir

Pushing new leaves after a long winter:

5acf9c3c341ef_Twagner2018-04-12P10404242

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Palmsbro
On 4/12/2018, 1:50:25, Pal Meir said:

Pushing new leaves after a long winter:

5acf9c3c341ef_Twagner2018-04-12P10404242

It even looks like a tiny trunk is pushing up!

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Pal Meir
On 15.4.2018, 16:15:44, Palmsbro said:

It even looks like a tiny trunk is pushing up!

Not yet a real trunk:

5ae24d46e1edd_Twagner2018-04-26P1040456.

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Flow

Mine is flowering for the first time but this winter's -11C and more than a week of below zero temperatures damaged the flowers quite a bit. Luckily, not all of the four flower stalks are this scorched.

 

20180427_134204.thumb.jpg.388c6dba97dfa0

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Pal Meir
18 minutes ago, Flow said:

Mine is flowering for the first time but this winter's -11C and more than a week of below zero temperatures damaged the flowers quite a bit. Luckily, not all of the four flower stalks are this scorched.

Congratulations! I guess mine have to wait another 15 years till flowering …………

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Flow
15 hours ago, Pal Meir said:

Congratulations! I guess mine have to wait another 15 years till flowering …………

Mine was only slightly larger than yours when I planted it 6 years ago. It was slow to start but when the trunk reached its final girth it began to speed up considerably. I reckon yours will flower in less than 10 years.

April 2012

5ae432bdb3fdf_April2012.jpg.ea63d3695103

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Flow

And here's a pic of the whole plant from today:

verkleinert.thumb.jpg.a14aba1b1be4d1283e

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Pal Meir
37 minutes ago, Flow said:

And here's a pic of the whole plant from today:

She’s grown up to a real beauty! :greenthumb:

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Pal Meir

31°C on 2018-06-05:

5b187316b11d3_Twagner2018-06-05P10406202

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mdsonofthesouth

Awesome palms! I am thinking of picking up a waggy next year. Trying to get nova and takil too!

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Pal Meir

This Waggy has relatively small and very stiff blades on long petioles. It was germinated in 2003 and kept as tiny bonsai palm on a window sill until March 2014, when it was planted outdoors in Heidelberg as replacement for another Waggy which had died during the severe and dry freezes (without any snow) in February 2012.

5b2d2a64986f1_Twagner2018-06-19P1040680.

The same palm 7 years earlier in a Ø12 cm x H10 cm plastic pot:

5b2d2a6b8d7c6_Twagner2011-03-23IMG_5451.

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Pal Meir

The traces of last winter:

5b3bbae6413f5_Twagner2018-07-03P1040721.

5b3bbaeeb2558_TWagner2018-07-03P1040722.

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mdsonofthesouth

My livistona chinensis did that before defoliating.

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Pal Meir
9 minutes ago, mdsonofthesouth said:

My livistona chinensis did that before defoliating.

This »trace« happened inside the meristem. Had the freeze been a little heavier it would have resulted into a spear pull, but still without defoliation of the older leaves.

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mdsonofthesouth
13 hours ago, Pal Meir said:

This »trace« happened inside the meristem. Had the freeze been a little heavier it would have resulted into a spear pull, but still without defoliation of the older leaves.

 

Besides the fact that livistona is far less leaf hardy and the fact that winter is over the swaggy looks to be more than fine!

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Flow
On 2018-7-5 05:12:13, mdsonofthesouth said:

 

Besides the fact that livistona is far less leaf hardy and the fact that winter is over the swaggy looks to be more than fine!

Mine shows the exact same damage on the first of this year's leaves. The following leaves are fine.

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mdsonofthesouth
7 hours ago, Flow said:

Mine shows the exact same damage on the first of this year's leaves. The following leaves are fine.

 

Mine looked deformed and missing parts of the frond, but then again most of them recovered from spear pull. The fronds after the initial growth in spring look amazing, and even some of last years fronds still look OK. 

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Pal Meir

Growth within 4 years:

5b4f78d3c198f_Twagner2014-2018P1040762.t

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