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Eric in Orlando

nice public planting of Livistona nitida

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Eric in Orlando

Here in Orlando they recently renovated the Citrus Bowl. This is a big football stadium just west of downtown. When they landscaped it they made it "palmy". They mostly used common stuff; Phoenix dactylifera, Phoenix sylvestris, Sabal palmetto, Washingtonia robusta. But along the east and west sides they planted nice groups of Livistona nitida. This is only the 2nd time I have seen Livistona nitida used in public plantings around here. The other is at the new Little Mermaid ride at Disney's Magic Kingdom.

Going to different landscape and nursery trade shows I see quite a few nurseries that are field growing mature Livistona nitida but hadn't seen it used. Good to see them getting planted now in a very high visible location.

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Eric in Orlando

img_2296_zps4bqueync.jpg

img_2302_zpspsvgzphi.jpg

img_2301_zpsnqlf2jmz.jpg

img_2295_zpsbdxox3nq.jpg

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Eric in Orlando

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NorthFlpalmguy

Those are real beauties!

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Pal Meir

img_2301_zpsnqlf2jmz.jpg

Very nice palms! But the pattern on the stems looks quite different from the ones in its natural habitat:

post-10467-0-57392700-1435246515_thumb.j post-10467-0-72148300-1435246541_thumb.j

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Monòver

img_2301_zpsnqlf2jmz.jpg

Very nice palms! But the pattern on the stems looks quite different from the ones in its natural habitat:

attachicon.gif79D09-2706.jpg attachicon.gif79D09-2705.jpg

This colour is because they have been cleansed recently.

In one year more they will be grey.

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edbrown_III

Eric,

How do you tell them from some of t h e other Livistonas ? I dont see them very often up here in the North

Best regards

Ed

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Alicehunter2000

This will be a backbone palm in the future up in North Florida. Will take a picture of the trunk on mine....Fishbranch cut it beautifully.

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Alicehunter2000

L. nitida have beautiful trunks!post-97-0-84022000-1435272337_thumb.jpgpost-97-0-06147800-1435272408_thumb.jpgpost-97-0-62087200-1435272453_thumb.jpg

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nomolos

From those pics they seem quite similar to L.Australis when bigger

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donalt

I saw them at the Citrus Bowl, too, while attending soccer match recently. They certainly are beautiful. Another palm beginning to see widely planted are ribbon palms.

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Pedro 65

David thats a Sabal sp, not any Livistona sorry to disappoint you :)

Great shots of them in Nature Zig :greenthumb:

Eric, does Fulva grow well in Florida ? and great pics as usual. :greenthumb:

Pete

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Alicehunter2000

http://www.fishbranchtreefarm.com/livistona-nitida---carnavon-gorge-palm.html

Lol....nah...your looking at the big causiarum on the right of the picture....the nitida is in the back behind the peach tree. I bought large L. nitida, L. saribus, L. decora. S. causiarum, W. robusta, queens and C. alba , huge P. sylvestris/canary hybrid, A wrightii from Fishbranch tree farms a couple of years ago. Ken helped me install them along with some of Mark Heaths big mules and Kens C. macrocarpa and D. Cabadae.....had a big thread on the install a couple of years ago.

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Pedro 65

Lol....nah...your looking at the big causiarum on the right of the picture....the nitida is in the back behind the peach tree. I bought large L. nitida, L. saribus, L. decora. S. causiarum, W. robusta, queens and C. alba from Fishbranch tree farms a couple of years ago. Ken helped me install them along with some of Mark Heaths big mules and Kens C. macrocarpa and D. Cabadae.....had a big thread on the install a couple of years ago.

Lol back, yeh , I only looked and upsized the last pic :) Pete

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edric

Great work Eric. thanks, Ed

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Phoenikakias

img_2301_zpsnqlf2jmz.jpg

Very nice palms! But the pattern on the stems looks quite different from the ones in its natural habitat:

attachicon.gif79D09-2706.jpg attachicon.gif79D09-2705.jpg

img_2301_zpsnqlf2jmz.jpg

Very nice palms! But the pattern on the stems looks quite different from the ones in its natural habitat:

attachicon.gif79D09-2706.jpg attachicon.gif79D09-2705.jpg

This colour is because they have been cleansed recently.

In one year more they will be grey.

My decora or 'decora' keeps the red color on its trunk for many years... I think I see a ... yellow stripe along petiole's abaxial side on some leaves? Is not this supposed to be a distinction feature of Livistona australis in contrast to Livistona nitida?

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Pal Meir

Here another nice specimen in its habitat with clean trunk:

post-10467-0-95124600-1435318393_thumb.j

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Pal Meir

And here the tallest L. nitida I could find in Carnarvon Gorge, also with a very clean trunk:

post-10467-0-65906700-1435319091_thumb.j

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Keith in SoJax

Nice. The only L. nitida I have are young seedlings about knee high. Would like to get some and create a small grove here on the homestead. We have nice L. decora and L. saribus now as well as a variety of smaller Livistona too, but so far, I haven't found large L. nitida for sale.

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Alicehunter2000

Keith get a trailer and go down their and get some. Their prices were very reasonable. They are IPS members. Their material is top notch. They will sell direct, but your trailer needs to be clean ( no plants from other nurseries). Disease control. Kristie Berg is contact.

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Eric in Orlando

I think that along with Livistona nitida that Beccariophoenix alfredii, Copernicia alba, Livistona decora, Livistona saribus, and Phoenix loureiroi are top palms for this area. These are palms that are soildly hardy in zone 9b/10a, underutilized and have great potential as tree farms in FL are starting to grow them in numbers now.

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Keith in SoJax

Keith get a trailer and go down their and get some. Their prices were very reasonable. They are IPS members. Their material is top notch. They will sell direct, but your trailer needs to be clean ( no plants from other nurseries). Disease control. Kristie Berg is contact.

Sounds reasonable. I appreciate the lead!

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Keith in SoJax

I think that along with Livistona nitida that Beccariophoenix alfredii, Copernicia alba, Livistona decora, Livistona saribus, and Phoenix loureiroi are top palms for this area. These are palms that are soildly hardy in zone 9b/10a, underutilized and have great potential as tree farms in FL are starting to grow them in numbers now.

Eric, in consideration of the TPPD outbreak, we need to be thinking beyond Phoenix sylvestnis, for sure. We have several B. alfredii in the ground and so far, so good. They've been in the ground 2 winters and have fared well. But they haven't experienced any zone 9a temps yet. However, they have been exposed to some pretty heavy frost and the only symptoms have been some leaf spotting on the older fronds. Copernicia alba seems solid, but I can't seem to keep one of them from getting Boron deficiency. Grrrr.

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willo68

Hey Eric, have you seen the large planting they have done at the Turnpike and 429 interchange?

Quite ompressive

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Eric in Orlando

No, I haven't seen there yet. What have they planted?

Further south they have put some major palm plantings along the FL Turnpike down towards Vero Beach, Jupiter and further south. They also have along I-4 south of Orlando out by the tourist areas at the Beachline and down to 192 and past towards Lakeland. Hopefully when they get the I-4 mess finished in Orlando in 5 (coughcough) years they will put in some nice palm plantings. I know that big grouping of Livistona decora along I-4 at the East/West Expressway are going to be moved elsewhere because of the construction.

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Alicehunter2000

Bismarkia seemed to be a pretty common sight along the Highways last I visited.....was in awe! Always look great no matter how common they may become.

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willo68

A ton of Bismarks, Decoras, very tall phoenix that dont seem like try are taking to well, I'm sure there are others but I am far from the expert on what they are and of course at highway speeds kubsa hard to focus. My sis lives in Montverde si when I visit this past year I get the treat

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Eric in Orlando

I will have to go out that way and check it out.

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donalt

img_2292_zpsnebipxtq.jpg

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this palm is not only becoming popular in central and north florida, but south florida,too. tall specimens have recently been planted in jupiter,florida,at harbourside on us1. they look great !

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donalt

this palm is not only becoming popular in central and north florida, but south florida, too. tall specimens have recently been planted in jupiter, florida, at a new, upscale development called harbourside on us 1. they look great !

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Tropicdoc

I guess I'm ignorant I can't really see the difference in the livistonas. Why should I consider getting a nitida? Help me out here guys. All the pics of the nitida look great btw.

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MOlivera

There's a new planting of Livistona Nitida on International speedway in Daytona Beach. I have a couple of these in my yard in Palm Coast and they've gone through 18F with very little markings on the leaves.

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TexasColdHardyPalms

I have two 15G plants that I'm working to get up to trunking size before I plant outside. I have heard great things about their hardiness and I'd like to be able to get a few established in zone 8B. After seeing these pictures they will be well worth taking the chance.

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Dave-Vero

The Turnpike does have some big new palm plantings toward Ft. Pierce and Port St. Lucie. I-95 at Vero is getting some landscaping, too.

Eric's short list of Orlando landscaping palms looks good. I'll have to try a Beccariophoenix alfredii if something dies in the yard and opens up some space. That, or find a neighbor to adopt one. The Livistonas make good landscape plants; they grow fast enough and transplant well. Of course Sabal palmetto is far better for wildlife.

Thanks for the L. nitida photos in habitat. I have the airline miles for two or three trips to Australia or New Zealand. So many things to see....

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Pal Meir

Thanks for the L. nitida photos in habitat. I have the airline miles for two or three trips to Australia or New Zealand. So many things to see....

Here another photo of L. nitida in habitat, but this time in pocket size (but already thriving under full Australian sun), maybe you can kidnap it?

post-10467-0-39455300-1441060307_thumb.j

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howfam
On ‎8‎/‎31‎/‎2015‎ ‎9‎:‎17‎:‎02‎, MOlivera said:

There's a new planting of Livistona Nitida on International speedway in Daytona Beach. I have a couple of these in my yard in Palm Coast and they've gone through 18F with very little markings on the leaves.

MOlivera:

Those Int'l Speedway L. Nitida's are super gorgeous. Looks like W. robusta at a distance. This palm has a lot of promise for Central and North Florida, and is a good alternative to W. robusta, which is succumbing to fusarium wilt across the state.

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howfam
On ‎8‎/‎30‎/‎2015‎ ‎4‎:‎39‎:‎45‎, donalt said:

this palm is not only becoming popular in central and north florida, but south florida, too. tall specimens have recently been planted in jupiter, florida, at a new, upscale development called harbourside on us 1. they look great !

I saw the Livistona's you mentioned on Google Street View; nice, but I think they are L. decora, deeply cut for ribbon effect. 

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RedRabbit
On 6/26/2015, 2:27:27, Eric in Orlando said:

I think that along with Livistona nitida that Beccariophoenix alfredii, Copernicia alba, Livistona decora, Livistona saribus, and Phoenix loureiroi are top palms for this area. These are palms that are soildly hardy in zone 9b/10a, underutilized and have great potential as tree farms in FL are starting to grow them in numbers now.

B. alfredi is a bit more tender than the others, no? I thought it was still kind of unproven for long term viability in Central Florida.

One palm I'm optimistic about is Kentiopsis Oliviformis, but it is unproven so far too. 

On 6/26/2015, 5:20:30, Alicehunter2000 said:

Bismarkia seemed to be a pretty common sight along the Highways last I visited.....was in awe! Always look great no matter how common they may become.

Bizzies are really getting common and I love it... When I was in Miami a couple weeks ago I noticed they have a lot of bismarkia down there and I think that really says a lot since they choose to plant bismarkias despite being able to grow basically whatever they want.

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Eric in Orlando

Beccariophoenix alfredii has about the same hardiness as Phoenix rupicola. It is definitely hardier (cool and cold) than Cocos nucifera but more cold sensitive than Syagrus romanzoffiana.

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