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Danilopez89

Is this a coconut or am I dreaming?

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Jubaea

I have found this to be an interesting topic topic follow. I think the heat and sun that the desert gets makes all the difference for the coconut palm. I was down in the desert after the January 2007 freeze and although plants like bougainvilla and mango were frozen way back, they had already regrown a great deal compared to coastal locations. At that time I was no into palms as much. I think the early warmth and sun may mitigate any damage cold weather may do. There is no fog like in coastal areas and hardly an rain. These factors along with a good micro climate would probably give other coconuts a chance to survive in the desert with proper irrigation and fertilization.

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Danilopez89

Most people even in La Quinta won't have the special micro climates to grow coconuts as you reported, this is not much different from some people trying to grow them in Newport (besides the known one which lived for many years, but now dead) and failing. Just because one can get lucky with their garden/house does not mean it is easily done by some one in the vicinity when we are dealing with extremely marginal Zones. Still if one is prepared for it, I think it is fun to try it out and learn with each try how to improve their chances further. There have been people on the forums that have tried it and failed the first times but eventually got good results with some tinkering:)

That's very right. Most people in La Quinta would not be able to grow a coco. But I see many possibilities when it comes to making yourself a microclimate and growing marginal stuff, now that sounds like fun. Here's a pic of the big mango tree next door to my friends house in the cove. I bet if this tree was across the street and exposed to the incoming northwest cold winds it would might have never made it. But then again I see mango trees that look like they are dead after the cold but then quickly recover with new growth with our heat.

post-9726-0-89385300-1433398349_thumb.jp

You can also see some papaya trees on this pic. My mom also grows papaya and her house gets way more cold and wind.

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Danilopez89

I have found this to be an interesting topic topic follow. I think the heat and sun that the desert gets makes all the difference for the coconut palm. I was down in the desert after the January 2007 freeze and although plants like bougainvilla and mango were frozen way back, they had already regrown a great deal compared to coastal locations. At that time I was no into palms as much. I think the early warmth and sun may mitigate any damage cold weather may do. There is no fog like in coastal areas and hardly an rain. These factors along with a good micro climate would probably give other coconuts a chance to survive in the desert with proper irrigation and fertilization.

Yes, definitely! Well said. That's what I'm thinking.

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Danilopez89

Hmm. Looks like it's the extra bit of heat that makes the difference.

Here's a street in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Coconuts on the right, it appears.

King_Abdullah_Street%2C_Jeddah.jpg

I think those are beccariophoenix Dave.... lol

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nick

@ Danilopez89 as you mentioned above, Plumeria and Papaya is also growing in your region. These other tropical plants are no indicators for a coco.

Here along the Cyprus coast you can find many Plumerias, Papayas and other tropic plants in the gardens without any protection but beside Stelios who is also active in this forum no coconut. I guess there could be some more microclimate hot spots around to support cocos. Our garden would give a try, but unfortunately I have no free wall facing south and the soil is like of concrete and a huge job to replace with sand. But I keep my fingers crossed for Stelios Coco palm and all others who want to try. Maybe once I do some changes in our garden and come back to this issue.

Edited by nick

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Zeeth

Most people even in La Quinta won't have the special micro climates to grow coconuts as you reported, this is not much different from some people trying to grow them in Newport (besides the known one which lived for many years, but now dead) and failing. Just because one can get lucky with their garden/house does not mean it is easily done by some one in the vicinity when we are dealing with extremely marginal Zones. Still if one is prepared for it, I think it is fun to try it out and learn with each try how to improve their chances further. There have been people on the forums that have tried it and failed the first times but eventually got good results with some tinkering:)

That's very right. Most people in La Quinta would not be able to grow a coco. But I see many possibilities when it comes to making yourself a microclimate and growing marginal stuff, now that sounds like fun. Here's a pic of the big mango tree next door to my friends house in the cove. I bet if this tree was across the street and exposed to the incoming northwest cold winds it would might have never made it. But then again I see mango trees that look like they are dead after the cold but then quickly recover with new growth with our heat.

attachicon.gifIMG_20150603_22981.jpg

You can also see some papaya trees on this pic. My mom also grows papaya and her house gets way more cold and wind.

How does irrigation work over there for large fruit trees like that? Here in Florida a mango never needs watering when established, so how does one water something with such an extensive root system in a place with so little rain?

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Alicehunter2000

I'm suprised a lot more people don't heat their pools with natural gas....pretty common in North Florida. You can heat up a small pool to amost spa conditions in a few hours for not acrazy amount of money.

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Danilopez89

Is this a CocoNUT or am I dreaming?(part2)

lol!

post-9726-0-15514400-1433445599_thumb.jppost-9726-0-26920500-1433445622_thumb.jppost-9726-0-05658000-1433445674_thumb.jp

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empireo22

yes. that one looks awesome! where did you find it?

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_Keith

Its all an elaborate hoax, I tell ya, a hoax. Or,,,,,possibly Aliens are slowly transforming out planet to meet their needs. Yeah, its the latter, I am sure of it.

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empireo22

Looks like a Beccariophoenix to me....

you know...I have seen beccariophoenix here with foliage very similar...but the trunks are different. not to mention cold hardy.

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Danilopez89

haha so how many think it has a good chance of fruiting? lol

???

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Danilopez89

In this pic it could be anything! Lol

Kinda looks like a Kentia....post-9726-0-73061700-1433455186_thumb.jp

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Palmaceae

That is a coconut, no doubt, and a nice one at that. Look at the trunk, a Beccariophoenix does not look like that.

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Zeeth

Looks like a Beccariophoenix to me....

No it's a coconut for sure... I guess the theory has been debunked about coconuts not growing in California. They apparently do excellently in certain areas in the desert...

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Danilopez89

Oh dear God. With the demise of the New Port Beach Coconut, it appeared that the quest and hopes of many palm lovers to grow coconuts in Southern Califonia were dashed. Now Daniel has rekindled all those hopes and dreams - I foresee many new coconuts getting planted.

If that Coconut could ever sustain a viable nut - just curious how much one would pay for one given the mother's vigor against cold temps ? Like the Inge Hoffman cold hardy Archies.

How much would you pay for a "cool hardy" Coconut ??? :interesting:

attachicon.gifHijackedThread.gif

How much would you pay?

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Danilopez89

I was kidding about the Beccariophoenix. Aren't they still a sort of "newly discovered". I hope they really do look that much alike because I already planted 4 on my yard because I wanted the "coconut look".

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Zeeth

I was kidding about the Beccariophoenix. Aren't they still a sort of "newly discovered". I hope they really do look that much alike because I already planted 4 on my yard because I wanted the "coconut look".

They definitely have a similar look to them, but you can tell them apart if you know what you're looking for. Here's some Beccariophoenix pictures to give you an idea of what they look like.

B. alfredii in Florida

post-3598-0-32998000-1433457578_thumb.jp

B. alfredii in habitat (not taken by me)

post-3598-0-42926700-1433457495_thumb.jp

B. fenestralis

post-3598-0-71042600-1433457414_thumb.jp

B. madagascariensis in habitat (not taken by me)

post-3598-0-70769600-1433457438_thumb.jp

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Cluster

What is the easiest way to compare both?:)

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Gonzer

Another Bigfoot sighting.

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Danilopez89

I was kidding about the Beccariophoenix. Aren't they still a sort of "newly discovered". I hope they really do look that much alike because I already planted 4 on my yard because I wanted the "coconut look".

They definitely have a similar look to them, but you can tell them apart if you know what you're looking for. Here's some Beccariophoenix pictures to give you an idea of what they look like.

B. alfredii in Florida

attachicon.gifIMG_3821.jpg

B. alfredii in habitat (not taken by me)

attachicon.gif10380156_322294647925556_4754686626438370406_o.jpg

B. fenestralis

attachicon.gifIMG_3833.jpg

B. madagascariensis in habitat (not taken by me)

attachicon.gif10990665_10152852212246461_8008518213413061848_n.jpg

Thank you soooo much for sharing those pics! Im in love! Specially with the B. Fenestralis! I have 4 B. Alfredii and one B. Madagascariensis in the ground already. Can't wait to try B. Fenestralis.

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Cluster

The leaflets of the cocos seem more tight, the trunk looks a bit different too but hard to explain why.

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Danilopez89

Another Bigfoot sighting.

This is not just "Another Bigfoot sighting"... I FOUND BIGFOOT IN ITS CAVE GIVING BIRTH TO LITTLE BIGFOOTS!post-9726-0-50884500-1433459951_thumb.jp

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Brad Mondel

Thanks to Dan, we now know that cocos can thrive in certain areas of Southern California with proper treatment and placement.

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Danilopez89

BOOM!

post-9726-0-03377800-1433461913_thumb.jp

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Danilopez89

My uploads look like crap. How do I make them "genie clear"?

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Cluster

You can try to upload them to external sites and then link them here.

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Moose

Oh dear God. With the demise of the New Port Beach Coconut, it appeared that the quest and hopes of many palm lovers to grow coconuts in Southern Califonia were dashed. Now Daniel has rekindled all those hopes and dreams - I foresee many new coconuts getting planted.

If that Coconut could ever sustain a viable nut - just curious how much one would pay for one given the mother's vigor against cold temps ? Like the Inge Hoffman cold hardy Archies.

How much would you pay for a "cool hardy" Coconut ??? :interesting:

attachicon.gifHijackedThread.gif

How much would you pay?

Paid $40 for three gallon Fiji Dwarf.

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Jim in Los Altos

Wow, I can just see it now. In a few years someone will verify that there are more square miles worth of coconut growing area in SoCal than in South Florida. Imagine that! The height and age of those newly discovered coconuts is significant. Everybody move to the deserts and plant coconuts!

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Mr. Coconut Palm

Those are some nice looking coconut palms by California standards and are probably the best that could ever be expected there. I wonder if the VERY hot dry summer climate has something to do with the leaf bases clinging to the trunk, maybe as a way for the palm to conserve moisture as opposed to shedding them to produce the beautiful ringed trunks like they normally do in areas with higher humidity and rainfall.

John

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Danilopez89

Is that an Ollie in the corner?

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