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Danilopez89

Is this a coconut or am I dreaming?

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Palmaceae

Very cool story, and very nice looking coconut palm. I think it looks better than the Newport coconut ever did.

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IHB1979

Great looking coconut palm. Sounds like he addressed every variable when growing in a marginal location. Gave it the best possible situation and it's thriving!

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Sandy Loam

Very Interesting Thread, I would love to hear more about this Palm, I hope it will make it

The fact that the guy that grows it said it also fruits, and he unlocked the secret of growing

coconuts, Makes it even more interesting,

I saw that you guys talked about Coconut Palms Living in the Desert, Well I must say it is

Possible, With a proper microclimate in it's area, Here in Israel, we have one Coco I think it is

about 10 years old now, It was brought from thailand as a sprout and it was planted near the

bay of the Dolphin Reef in the City of Eylat (the southest City in israel - total Desert) .. the temps

are high even during the winter, So the weather is stable, Not humid at all, But i belive that it's

proximity to the bay, Keeps it alive, Its the only Mature Coco Palm in Israel that i know about..

In the Center of israel the summer is very hot, Sometimes it can reach to 45C and the sun is

"Cooking" Everything, I have 2 Coco Palms Potted outside a large Containers and its partly

Shaded by Trees, but they do get decent exposure to the hot sunny rays, up untill now they

handle with it pritty well....

Looking forward to hear more about this dude and his Coco..

Cheers,

Lior.

This is interesting about the mature coconut tree in Eliat because the daytime winter high temperatures are warmer in this California town with the coconut (LaQuinta, California) than in Eilat, Israel ---- well, slightly warmer in January, the coldest month of the year (Eilat January average high = 20.8 Celcius, only 2 degrees colder than the LaQuinta average high for January). However, the average January low is slightly warmer in Eilat than in LaQuinta, CA (average January low = 9.6 celcius in Eilat): http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eilat When comparing the Eilat and LaQuinta average monthly temperatures charts year-round, they both look pretty similar. I wonder how tall the Eilat coconut tree is (photos?). I also wonder if the Eilat coconut tree experiences more humidity in the air because it is located at a beach resort area right on the Red Sea.

I suspect that the LaQuinta coconut tree is going to be pretty tall in a few years. It just is so strange to see a coconut tree growing in California because I identify Southern California with the usual arid climate palms like Phoenix and Washingtonia, especially the native Washingtonia palms of Southern California.

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Pando

Lol at the thread, and it's a great find.

It's as if the Newport Coconut has whispered to the PTalkers in its deathbed: "There... is... another... cali...fornia...co..co.......n...t"

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AuI3QvGEMZY

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Cluster

Lol at the thread, and it's a great find.

It's as if the Newport Coconut has whispered to the PTalkers in its deathbed: "There... is... another... cali...fornia...co..co.......n...t"

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AuI3QvGEMZY

Lol that was so good, now bring the walls and pools and start the clone coco wars.

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Danilopez89

Hey guys, sorry I'm taking so long to post more about the La Quinta coco. I just finished working and I'm on my way home to the wifi. I found another short video on my phone that I will upload. I know you guys want to know more about the care the coco gets so I'll get on it. My brain is working like an old computer, I'm still trying to download all the info I took in yesterday.

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Danilopez89

So this was my first time I ever see a coconut palm tree in person. Its really something else hearing and seeing the palm tree in action. I think I have a new favorite....

https://youtu.be/uBUw0aPTuvc

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Danilopez89

I did ask Greg about what he feeds his palm. He told me "I just give it palm fertilizer and blood meal several times a year". I can tell he goes heavy with the fertilizers...

post-9726-0-31493400-1433288948_thumb.jppost-9726-0-01246100-1433288970_thumb.jp

I think he said that was some ginger growing next to the palm.

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Danilopez89

As far as watering goes he told me that he gives the palm a heavy watering ussually once a week during the year, except for the cold months. During the cold he thinks maybe more like once a month. But I saw that he had sprinkler heads coming out of the ground so I asked about those. He said "oh yeah those turn on every day for ten minutes.

He told me a story about a time when they left for vacation and he accidentally left the water hose running inside the flower bed next to the pool. They were gone for 4 days when he came back he saw that it didn't even flood. So his soil is extremely fast draining...post-9726-0-57868800-1433289793_thumb.jp

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Cluster

I know the feeling Daniel, the first time I learned there were some on Madeira and went to check them for myself, is just amazing, especially once you get to see a healthy one. You should try one yourself, maybe you have a similar micro climate at your place or can arrange for one.

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Moose

Oh dear God. With the demise of the New Port Beach Coconut, it appeared that the quest and hopes of many palm lovers to grow coconuts in Southern Califonia were dashed. Now Daniel has rekindled all those hopes and dreams - I foresee many new coconuts getting planted.

If that Coconut could ever sustain a viable nut - just curious how much one would pay for one given the mother's vigor against cold temps ? Like the Inge Hoffman cold hardy Archies.

How much would you pay for a "cool hardy" Coconut ??? :interesting:

post-1729-0-92838100-1433293100_thumb.gi

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Zeeth

Sounds like he's doing a good job of taking care of the coconut, which obviously has helped it thrive. This coconut looks far healthier than the Newport coconut, so it will be interesting to see how tall it will eventually get. Hopefully the owner stays around for a while, because I feel that it would die rather quickly if it stopped getting watered.

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JEFF IN MODESTO

Wow, nice looking coco.

Clearly the microclimate has wonderful air drainage, I bet average winter lows are above 50f.

Looking at the huge plumeria , I doubt the actual location sees temps below freezing.

What surprized the heck out of me is when I googled it, I found it on a real estate site , said the value of the property and home is only $180k

Wow that's cheaper than a similar house here in the valley !

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Cluster

With the pool around it will soften the extreme weather but not reaching temperatures below freezing seems unlikely, the upper valley has record lows of 19 f and La Quinta is said to have record lows of 17 while the lower valley has record lows of 13 f. While I doubt the lows will get that low with the pool and the enclosed area I am not sure it is enough to make up for such extreme temperatures, maybe 1 or 2 f, just pure guessing.This year there were 3 nights with temperatures freezing, registered by the amateur stations around. Even in south coast CA there can be temperatures reaching it as far as I am aware. Hopefully the coconut will live many years to come. These events are probably very rare so that might enable trees and palms to get stronger and withstand such events should they occur for a brief period of time in this micro-climate.

Edited by Cluster

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Jim in Los Altos

With the pool around it will soften the extreme weather but not reaching temperatures below freezing seems unlikely, the upper valley has record lows of 19 f and La Quinta is said to have record lows of 17 while the lower valley has record lows of 13 f. While I doubt the lows will get that low with the pool and the enclosed area I am not sure it is enough to make up for such extreme temperatures, maybe 1 or 2 f, just pure guessing.This year there were 3 nights with temperatures freezing, registered by the amateur stations around. Even in south coast CA there can be temperatures reaching it as far as I a aware. Hopefully the coconut will live many years to come.

It doesn't help much to quote record low temperatures that occurred 80 to 100 years ago since the area has changed so dramatically since then. The metro heat island effect now is huge and didn't exist when those temperatures of19F and 17F were recorded. Is there even any information as to where those thermometers were located back then? A neighbor of mine owned a beautiful home there for fifteen years and never saw frost where he was located next to a golf course of all things.

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Cluster

Daniel confirmed there are freezing temperatures around there and so did the weather amateur stations this year, for example, reaching 26-30 (depending). While I do not know how viable these stations are the Nooa ones do record low temperatures. Florida reached close to record lows during 2010. The climate is warming up and in this case the heat island effect is also something more recent in the area that aids as well, but we are not talking of an area that was close to frost free, those are extreme low temperatures. Here in Lisbon we do not have ever recorded a freezing temperature in the official station, yet in recent years we did get close to 32 f on the official station (maybe it would be a bit warmer if the station was closer to the sea).

With that said a well cared coco as shown is growing well and it will thrive in this micro-climate. If it was outside in a park the story could have been different, who knows. Cocos have been known (with good genetics) to withstand below freezing temperatures if they are properly treated and it does not last too long.

Edited by Cluster

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Danilopez89

I have cleaned pools in the La Quinta Cove area for many years and have in previous years seen plants such as bougainvillea completely burn all the way with the cold. And as a matter of fact I just remembered of a time I went to my friend's house up in the La Quinta Cove during one of those super cold days and he actually had icicles hanging from his roof. They do get freezes in that area. I also remember walking on frozen grass early in the mornings out there. Its kinda funny how plants like bougainvillea or banana trees and others alike can freeze and loose all its foliage but they keep growing fast with our heat and quickly recover. Another thing I should mention is that Greg said that his plumerias drop all their leaves every year with the cold but this past winter they didn't drop all their leaves and even had some flowers on them.

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Cluster

Nice information again Daniel, La Quinta surrounded by all those hills with so many houses helps the heat island effect further. I hope you try one coconut yourself and show us how it is doing, maybe plant it middle spring:) perhaps even this year if you could get one!

Edited by Cluster

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Danilopez89

Thinking back I remember looking at the weekly forecast for the area during the cold this past winter. One day they were calling for temperatures in the high teens, I think 18 F. I knew I wouldn't get those temps here at my house and didnt worry too much but I didn't doubt that some places here in the valley would experience those extreme lows. I think the cold came in a few days before New Years. I did get some pretty bad cold burn on one of my 5 R. Regias. It only happened to one of them and I think it was the cold that drained down the roof on one side of my house.

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Danilopez89

Nice information again Daniel, La Quinta surrounded by all those hills with so many houses helps the heat island effect further. I hope you try one coconut yourself and show us how it is doing, maybe plant it middle spring:) perhaps even this year if you could get one!

Hehehe...

Im already on my 5th one. I first bought two in January of 2014 and planted one in the ground and another in a bigger pot right away. These two are still alive. I bought two more towards the end of summer of 2014 and planted them in mid September. One quickly crocked after the cold we had in late December 2014 and the other just took some damage. It looked okay for a few months but then began to slowly decline and finally died two weeks ago. I had a problem with little tiny black ants and I think it hurt my coco just as much as the cold did. My 5th coconut I bought in late January of 2015. I saw this coconut all winter long at a local HD and after seeing it there month after month I decided to buy the little guy and give it a good home. This one I will try to baby it for as long as I can, I will take it in the house during the cold and hopefully when I plant it in the ground it will be strong enough to make it. But now my new mission will be trying to get a hold of some Hawaiian talls...

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Lior_Gal

Very Interesting Thread, I would love to hear more about this Palm, I hope it will make it

The fact that the guy that grows it said it also fruits, and he unlocked the secret of growing

coconuts, Makes it even more interesting,

I saw that you guys talked about Coconut Palms Living in the Desert, Well I must say it is

Possible, With a proper microclimate in it's area, Here in Israel, we have one Coco I think it is

about 10 years old now, It was brought from thailand as a sprout and it was planted near the

bay of the Dolphin Reef in the City of Eylat (the southest City in israel - total Desert) .. the temps

are high even during the winter, So the weather is stable, Not humid at all, But i belive that it's

proximity to the bay, Keeps it alive, Its the only Mature Coco Palm in Israel that i know about..

In the Center of israel the summer is very hot, Sometimes it can reach to 45C and the sun is

"Cooking" Everything, I have 2 Coco Palms Potted outside a large Containers and its partly

Shaded by Trees, but they do get decent exposure to the hot sunny rays, up untill now they

handle with it pritty well....

Looking forward to hear more about this dude and his Coco..

Cheers,

Lior.

This is interesting about the mature coconut tree in Eliat because the daytime winter high temperatures are warmer in this California town with the coconut (LaQuinta, California) than in Eilat, Israel ---- well, slightly warmer in January, the coldest month of the year (Eilat January average high = 20.8 Celcius, only 2 degrees colder than the LaQuinta average high for January). However, the average January low is slightly warmer in Eilat than in LaQuinta, CA (average January low = 9.6 celcius in Eilat): http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eilat When comparing the Eilat and LaQuinta average monthly temperatures charts year-round, they both look pretty similar. I wonder how tall the Eilat coconut tree is (photos?). I also wonder if the Eilat coconut tree experiences more humidity in the air because it is located at a beach resort area right on the Red Sea.

I suspect that the LaQuinta coconut tree is going to be pretty tall in a few years. It just is so strange to see a coconut tree growing in California because I identify Southern California with the usual arid climate palms like Phoenix and Washingtonia, especially the native Washingtonia palms of Southern California.

Hello Sandy,

Very interesting information, It seems very logical that if the Temps in Eilat (Israel) and LaQuinta (CA) are the Same,

And Coco Palms will manage to Grow on both Areas, Another Fact is that Both of them are Planted in a Very Close

Proximity to a large water source that may Help the palm to sustain itself, I'm sure that Humidity levels near the water

sources are Significantly Higher Compared to more distant locations.

I don't Have Pictures of the Cocos in Eilat ... But since Israel is such a small place, and I was in the Dolphin Reef

In Eilat for several times in the past, So it won't be a problem for me to go and find this palm, My friends saw it as well

about a year ago, and they told me its pritty tall, But it will be better to see it on my own and take some pics, I will post

them here as well for sure.

Edited by Lior_Gal

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Moose

I have cleaned pools in the La Quinta Cove area for many years and have in previous years seen plants such as bougainvillea completely burn all the way with the cold. And as a matter of fact I just remembered of a time I went to my friend's house up in the La Quinta Cove during one of those super cold days and he actually had icicles hanging from his roof. They do get freezes in that area. I also remember walking on frozen grass early in the mornings out there. Its kinda funny how plants like bougainvillea or banana trees and others alike can freeze and loose all its foliage but they keep growing fast with our heat and quickly recover. Another thing I should mention is that Greg said that his plumerias drop all their leaves every year with the cold but this past winter they didn't drop all their leaves and even had some flowers on them.

Daniel - if Greg's Coconut experienced anywhere near some of the reported lows, I'd have to say that this is an anomalous cold hardy Coconut.

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Palmaceae

Didn't you guys get freezing temps this year in So California, and even some snow? As this coconut does not look cold damaged from the pictures? I know the climate there varies quite a bit but even 32f that palm should show some damage.

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rprimbs

Didn't you guys get freezing temps this year in So California, and even some snow? As this coconut does not look cold damaged from the pictures? I know the climate there varies quite a bit but even 32f that palm should show some damage.

No, we sure didn't. It was a super mild winter.

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Danilopez89

Didn't you guys get freezing temps this year in So California, and even some snow? As this coconut does not look cold damaged from the pictures? I know the climate there varies quite a bit but even 32f that palm should show some damage.

For the most part it was a very mild winter, but we did get freezing temps the last 3 or 4 days of the year. And yes we did get snow in Southern California. I think it snowed in Temecula Ca. That never happens.

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Cluster

The surrounding walls protecting the coco, especially the base and roots, as well as the pool might be the difference between letting it survive until warm weather strikes again. It probably also increases humidity which I believe is something they hate not having in the desert climates. One thing interesting about Greg's Garden is that it is enclosed enough with the walls and the trees/plants around, this creates a synergy with the pool.

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Cluster

Didn't you guys get freezing temps this year in So California, and even some snow? As this coconut does not look cold damaged from the pictures? I know the climate there varies quite a bit but even 32f that palm should show some damage.

Heck coconuts are weird some even die before that, it probably depends how much heat they receive the next day/couple of days or how long they are exposed to high 30s and below. Treating a coconut after a cold spell to avoid rotting probably also aids.

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Danilopez89

Do they really need that much humidity? We live in a super dry desert and I doubt that small pool provides a whole lot of humidity.

Maybe the huge plumeria tree helps keep some humidity around the coco. Greg did tell me he waters the palm every day with automatic sprinkles for ten minutes. I dont know how much water those sprinkles give the palm in 10 minutes but I have a feeling it might be alot. Another thing I should point out is that on the other side of the wall next to the coco is a long cement drive way that probably helps keep that area warmer.

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DoomsDave

Hmm. Looks like it's the extra bit of heat that makes the difference.

Here's a street in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Coconuts on the right, it appears.

King_Abdullah_Street%2C_Jeddah.jpg

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Danilopez89

So, Mr. Lopez, what did the owner say?

Oh, the IRONY, a coco growing in the desert. At least to "normal" people.

They do grow in Arabia. Near the sea. Enough water, heat, well, maybe not so bad.

Looks like a cocos to me.

I'm sure Mr. Lopez will provide a riveting further tale . . . .

That's why I wonder if they really need that much humidity Dave. Maybe they need alot of water but needs fast draining soil. Is Greg's soil even considered soil? I think its pretty much crushed up rock from the mountains. Those are ancient coral mountains.

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Danilopez89

It also snows on those mountains at the Cove....post-9726-0-61070700-1433354202_thumb.jp

This is at the top of the LQ Cove. I've been here many times. Its a nice place to hang out on those beaches.

Edited by Danilopez89

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Danilopez89

I think the last time the mountains on around the La Quinta Cove got covered in snow was in 2007....

post-9726-0-59736000-1433354472_thumb.jppost-9726-0-78609500-1433354483_thumb.jp

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DoomsDave

So, Mr. Lopez, what did the owner say?

Oh, the IRONY, a coco growing in the desert. At least to "normal" people.

They do grow in Arabia. Near the sea. Enough water, heat, well, maybe not so bad.

Looks like a cocos to me.

I'm sure Mr. Lopez will provide a riveting further tale . . . .

That's why I wonder if they really need that much humidity Dave. Maybe they need alot of water but needs fast draining soil. Is Greg's soil even considered soil? I think its pretty much crushed up rock from the mountains. Those are ancient coral mountains.

That coral is just the thing, probably.

Coconuts will grow in pure sand if conditions are right, lapped by sea water.

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Cluster

They do not like very dry conditions, that does not mean they won't be ok and it is getting water from sprinkles everyday. Still I believe the pool might help a tiny bit with the humidity in the garden, but the most important thing is that it helps to retain heat during cold nights along the wall etc:

qo6mf8.jpg

Edited by Cluster

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JEFF IN MODESTO

We have to be very careful to describe this as a microclimate issue not a " special super cold hardy zone 9 coconut tree"

Alot of people research this site and without proof we wouldnt want visitors thinking that this coconut isn't anything other than a plain coconut .

I live in a usda zone 9b climate.

Our average lowest temp for the winter is in the 26-27f degree range.

Let me tell you what I know I cannot grow exposed without serious freeze protection.

1. Mangoes- they start to show damage at 31f in my yard a degree or two lower and even a large tree is dead.

2. Plumeria- I can grow in pots but they must over winter under my patio where temps stay above freezing..

3. Royal palms- freeze dead even in a mild winter here.

4. Coconuts- I have tried more ways than you can imagine. I have even tried with soil heaters... Dead by Christmas even in the absence of sub freezing temps.

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Silas_Sancona

Many great observational thoughts to ponder, but, i definitely agree with Jeff ( in Modesto). As awesome as it seems to have endured in it's location, or, other future specimens which turn up in favorable spots in and around the valley, Coconuts will always be a challenge anywhere outside of their favored places. One thing i find intriguing is that this specimen, as well as the Newport Coco are both Hawaiian Talls.. Really wonder if this variety may hold some sort of advantage for So. Cal. over others??

That being said, I am looking forward to trying a few myself next year after getting settled in Phoenix, and yes,i am sure seeing this thread will spark the race to grow the next Cali Coco.. Let alone the first, or second in the Valley Of The Sun. I am sure the stories and observations that lie ahead will be interesting reads as posts surface.

As far as Plumeria are concerned, Most ( especially P. rubra and varieties) naturally loose their leaves in response to the "dry season" drought conditions that exist in Mexico and the Caribbean where they originate from. It was an Explorer to which the Genus was named for that brought them to Hawaii and the rest of the world where they can stay partially foliated through the winters there.

The only plants i have seen still fully in leaf in the winter here were down in Homestead at a nursery i get a lot of mine from. All 30 varieties i have dropped everything by December last year despite a fairly warm winter. That being said, there are a couple large Plumeria in the neighborhood that held flowers all the way through mid January.


As far as the plumeria alongside the Coconut there, no doubt it added some level of protection ..along with the wall and other factors giving the coco a distinct advantage. If brutal frosts/freezes were a norm there in La Quinta, neither of the plumeria in the pictures would be that large.. or look like specimens i see on a daily basis here. Quite impressed.

Overall, i am glad a successor to the Newport Coco has been located and, thanks to the effort by Dan and the welcoming Homeowner, we have lots of great pictures to drool over.. and inspire what, for me, pushing limits is all about.. You might succeed.. you might not but at least there is inspiration and a reason to try. Along the way, you learn a few things.

-Nathan

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Danilopez89

We have to be very careful to describe this as a microclimate issue not a " special super cold hardy zone 9 coconut tree"

Alot of people research this site and without proof we wouldnt want visitors thinking that this coconut isn't anything other than a plain coconut .

I live in a usda zone 9b climate.

Our average lowest temp for the winter is in the 26-27f degree range.

Let me tell you what I know I cannot grow exposed without serious freeze protection.

1. Mangoes- they start to show damage at 31f in my yard a degree or two lower and even a large tree is dead.

2. Plumeria- I can grow in pots but they must over winter under my patio where temps stay above freezing..

3. Royal palms- freeze dead even in a mild winter here.

4. Coconuts- I have tried more ways than you can imagine. I have even tried with soil heaters... Dead by Christmas even in the absence of sub freezing temps.

I don't think we have said that it's a "special cold hardy zone 9b coconut tree" yet... Although....

Jeff, our average winter lows are about the same but out here we can grow mangoes, plumeria, royal palms, and coconuts. My climate overall is just different. We have heat in winter, and most of California doesn't. And besides I would never want anyone to get their hopes up about growing a coconut tree themselves because then they might just do that.

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Danilopez89

Many great observational thoughts to ponder, but, i definitely agree with Jeff ( in Modesto). As awesome as it seems to have endured in it's location, or, other future specimens which turn up in favorable spots in and around the valley, Coconuts will always be a challenge anywhere outside of their favored places. One thing i find intriguing is that this specimen, as well as the Newport Coco are both Hawaiian Talls.. Really wonder if this variety may hold some sort of advantage for So. Cal. over others??

That being said, I am looking forward to trying a few myself next year after getting settled in Phoenix, and yes,i am sure seeing this thread will spark the race to grow the next Cali Coco.. Let alone the first, or second in the Valley Of The Sun. I am sure the stories and observations that lie ahead will be interesting reads as posts surface.

As far as Plumeria are concerned, Most ( especially P. rubra and varieties) naturally loose their leaves in response to the "dry season" drought conditions that exist in Mexico and the Caribbean where they originate from. It was an Explorer to which the Genus was named for that brought them to Hawaii and the rest of the world where they can stay partially foliated through the winters there.

The only plants i have seen still fully in leaf in the winter here were down in Homestead at a nursery i get a lot of mine from. All 30 varieties i have dropped everything by December last year despite a fairly warm winter. That being said, there are a couple large Plumeria in the neighborhood that held flowers all the way through mid January.

As far as the plumeria alongside the Coconut there, no doubt it added some level of protection ..along with the wall and other factors giving the coco a distinct advantage. If brutal frosts/freezes were a norm there in La Quinta, neither of the plumeria in the pictures would be that large.. or look like specimens i see on a daily basis here. Quite impressed.

Overall, i am glad a successor to the Newport Coco has been located and, thanks to the effort by Dan and the welcoming Homeowner, we have lots of great pictures to drool over.. and inspire what, for me, pushing limits is all about.. You might succeed.. you might not but at least there is inspiration and a reason to try. Along the way, you learn a few things.

-Nathan

100% agree with your comment.

That's the truth. Coconuts can barely even take anything under 40 F. That's why we don't see them in so. cal. But this one does, and maybe if people keep trying they will find that others will make it also. I really believe that places like the Coachella Valley and some Phoenix areas can pull off some more cocos.

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Cluster

Most people even in La Quinta won't have the special micro climates to grow coconuts as you reported, this is not much different from some people trying to grow them in Newport (besides the known one which lived for many years, but now dead) and failing. Just because one can get lucky with their garden/house does not mean it is easily done by some one in the vicinity when we are dealing with extremely marginal Zones. Still if one is prepared for it, I think it is fun to try it out and learn with each try how to improve their chances further. There have been people on the forums that have tried it and failed the first times but eventually got good results with some tinkering:)

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