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Silas_Sancona

A rare find in Bradenton

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Silas_Sancona

Living here in Bradenton, the diversity of flowering trees around town is obvious if one knows where to look. Royal Poinciana, Jacaranda, 4 species of Trumpet Trees, Orchid Trees, Bombax cebia ( red kapok), and Silk Floss are easily seen thoughout neighborhoods I pass on a daily basis.

Other trees, such as Pseudobombax ellipticum, Ylang Ylang, and Cassia fistula are rarer but still common enough if you drive around enough. One group of trees I didn't expect to see here are the Brachychitons, particularly the flowering species.

Just down the street from the house, a isolated street tree I took for a large Jatropha turned out to be something way more unique. While shorter and "different" from the huge specimens I remember seeing back in CA, this Flame tree is a great find.


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post-7081-0-09708300-1430714046_thumb.jp










Edited by Silas_Sancona

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Silas_Sancona

Two more shots.


post-7081-0-23833800-1430714163_thumb.jp
post-7081-0-70151600-1430714151_thumb.jp


I also came across a rough looking Brachychiton discolor in a neighborhood in the Bayshore Gardens area of town. May try and get pictures if I can talk to the home owner.

-Nathan


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Pip

Brachychiton are not so rare in my area but I do believe that they should be planted more in urban area's.

Here are some pics of a Brachychiton discolor flowering out of season here in Adelaide. They usually flower diring summer from December to the end of February and completely leafless.

post-10546-0-61803900-1430717523_thumb.j

post-10546-0-39685000-1430717557_thumb.j

post-10546-0-91731800-1430717666_thumb.j

post-10546-0-81084600-1430717815_thumb.jpost-10546-0-28356200-1430717875_thumb.j

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peachy

Flame trees are commonly planted by the city council as street trees around here. This summer just gone they were glorious. Pip I planted a discolour about 17 years ago and the rotten thing is yet to flower.

Peachy

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The Silent Seed

They are wonderful trees - Gotta love the trunk shapes - I have 4 or 5 species here. Some have fuzzy leaves, which I'm a sucker for!

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Eric in Orlando

Very nice!

I just saw a big one at Epcot yesterday in full bloom. It is planted in the jungle in front of the Mexican pyramid.

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Pip

Flame trees are commonly planted by the city council as street trees around here. This summer just gone they were glorious. Pip I planted a discolour about 17 years ago and the rotten thing is yet to flower.

Peachy

Oh no don't tell me that Peachy. I pulled out the Chinese Elm that my street's developer planted and planted Brachychiton discolor in its place. I had the Lace bark in a pot for about three years so that makes it 8 years old and 4.5 meters tall. I planted it because I rented a house that had one. I actually used to park my car under it so for the months it flowered the car shed fuzzy bells as it traveled down the road.

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Silas_Sancona

Pip, Nice pictures, The B. discolor I came across locally is also flowering with a majority of it's canopy which contrasts, like you had said, how they usually flower back in Southern CA, ( mostly leafless) or, the trees id seen there.

Peachy, maybe give the tree a couple good whacks with a Bamboo pole.. Strange as it sounds, a guy here in Tampa who hosts a Gardening- related radio talk show recommended this practice to people whose Fruit trees stubbornly refused to produce fruit/ flower. The idea was to make the tree in question "wake up". Found the info interesting.

Eric, you get any pictures of the specimen you came across?.. Before seeing this specimen, let alone the B. discolor I spotted, I was under the assumption that maybe the overall warmth/ humidity here might be the reason these two specimens are the only ones I have personally seen anywhere in the Tampa/Sarasota Bay Areas. Perhaps it is just a matter of availability in local nurseries. In any event, would be awesome to see more. Especially placed next to any of the Jacarandas now in full bloom here. Coming home today, you could easily spot the glowing red canopy of the Flame tree from several blocks away.

-Nathan





Edited by Silas_Sancona

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BigFrond

This is a very fast growing tree. I planted mine from seed and the trunk is about 1.5 ft across after 10 years. I had to lace it to prevent it from growing too tall. It was very close to meeting the chain saw, but wifey would have none of it.

post-125-0-77544600-1430790725_thumb.jpg

Edited by BigFrond

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BigFrond

I jst don't know why my phone is always posting pix sideway

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Palmdude

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Eric in Orlando

Pip, Nice pictures, The B. discolor I came across locally is also flowering with a majority of it's canopy which contrasts, like you had said, how they usually flower back in Southern CA, ( mostly leafless) or, the trees id seen there.

Peachy, maybe give the tree a couple good whacks with a Bamboo pole.. Strange as it sounds, a guy here in Tampa who hosts a Gardening- related radio talk show recommended this practice to people whose Fruit trees stubbornly refused to produce fruit/ flower. The idea was to make the tree in question "wake up". Found the info interesting.

Eric, you get any pictures of the specimen you came across?.. Before seeing this specimen, let alone the B. discolor I spotted, I was under the assumption that maybe the overall warmth/ humidity here might be the reason these two specimens are the only ones I have personally seen anywhere in the Tampa/Sarasota Bay Areas. Perhaps it is just a matter of availability in local nurseries. In any event, would be awesome to see more. Especially placed next to any of the Jacarandas now in full bloom here. Coming home today, you could easily spot the glowing red canopy of the Flame tree from several blocks away.

-Nathan

No, I did not. I hope to get back out there in the next week. I tried to get a photo but the sun was totally in the wrong spot. That tree has been growing there for many years. This is the first time I have seen it flowering.

A few years ago when Morningstar Nursery was still in business, they were growing this. And they sold lots of plants to the big orange box store. I saw quite a few in stores around here so some got distributed in the Orlando area.

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Jeff Searle

I'm curious, the flowers from the first group of pictures (Eric) and the next group in post #2 look nothing alike. So my question.....are these both species from the genus mentioned? Please educate me. Lol

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Loxahatchee Adam

They are all Brachychitons. I'm not sure if the first pics posted are Brachychiton populneus x acerifolius or another cross. The red flowers are acerifolius, but it does not have the lobed leaves typical of that ("acer"ifolius....think Acer- Maple-shaped leaf).

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_Keith

Pretty sure I saw on of those on Beach Blvd today in the Garden Grove area.

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Silas_Sancona

Pip, Nice pictures, The B. discolor I came across locally is also flowering with a majority of it's canopy which contrasts, like you had said, how they usually flower back in Southern CA, ( mostly leafless) or, the trees id seen there.

Peachy, maybe give the tree a couple good whacks with a Bamboo pole.. Strange as it sounds, a guy here in Tampa who hosts a Gardening- related radio talk show recommended this practice to people whose Fruit trees stubbornly refused to produce fruit/ flower. The idea was to make the tree in question "wake up". Found the info interesting.

Eric, you get any pictures of the specimen you came across?.. Before seeing this specimen, let alone the B. discolor I spotted, I was under the assumption that maybe the overall warmth/ humidity here might be the reason these two specimens are the only ones I have personally seen anywhere in the Tampa/Sarasota Bay Areas. Perhaps it is just a matter of availability in local nurseries. In any event, would be awesome to see more. Especially placed next to any of the Jacarandas now in full bloom here. Coming home today, you could easily spot the glowing red canopy of the Flame tree from several blocks away.

-Nathan

No, I did not. I hope to get back out there in the next week. I tried to get a photo but the sun was totally in the wrong spot. That tree has been growing there for many years. This is the first time I have seen it flowering.

A few years ago when Morningstar Nursery was still in business, they were growing this. And they sold lots of plants to the big orange box store. I saw quite a few in stores around here so some got distributed in the Orlando area.

Good to know. Sad that Morningstar went out of business.

-Nathan

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Eric in Orlando

We have a B. acerfolius growing here at Leu Gardens. It is about 20ft tall and been in the ground for around 12 years but it has never flowered. We also have a B. australis about 30ft tall but it has also never flowered.

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Geoff

Brachychitons seem very well adapted to the warmer areas of southern California as well

Brachychiton acerfolia

post-426-0-33865000-1430930758_thumb.jpgpost-426-0-22597800-1430930777_thumb.jpg

Brachychiton australis

post-426-0-12247300-1430931177_thumb.jpg

never seen this species flower in California

Brachychiton bidwillii

post-426-0-35034700-1430930804_thumb.jpgpost-426-0-06631800-1430930831_thumb.jpg

Brachychiton discolor

post-426-0-90405700-1430930852_thumb.jpgpost-426-0-14152600-1430930871_thumb.jpg

Brachychiton muellerianus (no adult trees in California that I have seen,… yet)

post-426-0-47865900-1430930895_thumb.jpgpost-426-0-81639700-1430930915_thumb.jpg

Brachychiton populeneus (an relatively ugly street tree plant ALL OVER southern California

post-426-0-51608300-1430930952_thumb.jpgpost-426-0-92408600-1430931057_thumb.jpg (this shot is actually of my Brachychiton discolor x rupestris… but flowers look almost the same)

Brachychiton rupestris

post-426-0-50949300-1430931087_thumb.jpgpost-426-0-45965900-1430931126_thumb.jpg

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BigFrond

B. rupestris is the best of the bunch, and I didn't plant one.

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