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CYPALMS

Mediterranean List of Palms

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CYPALMS

The way i see it, you can grow Howeas in 2 ways.

Either you keep it in partial shade and a protected spot so you dont have to worry for hot dry winds and high temps or cold spells, or you start by acclimating them in stages with progressively more exposure to sun, then plant them out in full sun, and hope that you dont get prolonged sub zero temps or consecutive days of near zero temps. My choice for my place (Cyprus) is the second one, as the sub zero temps are very rare and usually are followed by warmer days which will assist with survival. Cosmetic damage will happen at extreme conditions, no matter what you do.

And to back my opinion for Cyprus i am going to borrow MattyB's information posted in this topic http://www.palmtalk.org/forum/index.php?/topic/43572-the-kentia-palm-front-office-material/?hl=kentia

where the acclimated Howeas only get a leaf burn when temps are over 100F etc.

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Alicante

I've found some photos of Roystoneas which are next to my town, they are from a website which sells them:

Roystonea-2-350x350.jpg

it appears that with good irrigation they grow very good!

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Phoenikakias

The way i see it, you can grow Howeas in 2 ways.

Either you keep it in partial shade and a protected spot so you dont have to worry for hot dry winds and high temps or cold spells, or you start by acclimating them in stages with progressively more exposure to sun, then plant them out in full sun, and hope that you dont get prolonged sub zero temps or consecutive days of near zero temps. My choice for my place (Cyprus) is the second one, as the sub zero temps are very rare and usually are followed by warmer days which will assist with survival. Cosmetic damage will happen at extreme conditions, no matter what you do.

And to back my opinion for Cyprus i am going to borrow MattyB's information posted in this topic http://www.palmtalk.org/forum/index.php?/topic/43572-the-kentia-palm-front-office-material/?hl=kentia

where the acclimated Howeas only get a leaf burn when temps are over 100F etc.

You've put very well George! Further I think that Cyprus (correct me please if I am wrong, or there is a clear difference between inland and strictly coastal areas there) is prone to hot/scorching temps (above 35 C) in summer like in middle-eastern countries. If this is indeed the case I strongly recommend that any Kentia be outplanted on a north or east facing position, and certainly a west facing one should be on all counts avoided. In Nauplion a friend of mine bought for his hotel's garden two large (and respectively expensive) trunking palms in huge pots. A Caryota and a Kentia. The Caryota is fruiting now, the Kentia carked!

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Pip

I wish I still lived in my old beachside neighbourhood where there are meny examples of Howea growing very well in full sun. Thete are even some very tall specimens that must be close to 60 years old. The summers here often experience temperatures well past 40c and no significant rain for up to 5 months or more.

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Phoenikakias

I assume the word not significant refers to the rain's volume and its ability to saturate soil. This however is not necessarily connected with AIR HUMIDITY. Even the slightest rain of course connected with a cloudy weather increases air humidity even after stop of rain fall. I used to keep in my cold frame a pot with 3 Kentias also during summer. Temps inside the cold frame were surpassing every single day for some time the 40 C and nights were also warm. But the plants (and their roots also since potted ) were not negatively affected, but some growth slowdown during July and August. However the spot inside the cold frame was the least exposed to direct sun light and pot was surrounded with soucers filled with water.

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Pip

Humidity can be very low particularly during summer in Adelaide. The summer just gone was more humid (luckily) due to the monsoonal weather from further north actually reaching us when the temperature was extremely high. The usual damage caused by 40c+ weather did not occur. January had a few days of heavy rain but then nothing much until a few weeks ago.

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SouthSeaNate

Howea forsteriana grow with no problems even in the open sun here in Malta, but we have very high humidity here, being a tiny Island...

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Alicante

Giant Howea Forsteriana in A Coruña, Spain at 43º22'N https://goo.gl/maps/RuArSyhTbfo  and impressive Phoenix Canariensis nearby. 

I've read in a Spanish gardening forum that the same park had other Howeas, but it's very hard to look for them. I've selected the Street View image from winter to make the Howea pretty noticeable, but most Street View images are outside the winter and as all of the trees are also very big, the Howea is barely noticed between them, and this one is because it's near the street. Impossible to seek for palms inside of that park!

Edited by Alicante
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beliz1985
On ‎15‎/‎04‎/‎2015‎ ‎16‎:‎13‎:‎47, Alicante said:

 

xoqwbm.jpg

How old is this map or who made it? LOL My country doesn't exist here :) I hope this is not P..tins vision :huh:

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Alicante
On 6/6/2018 19:19:42, beliz1985 said:

How old is this map or who made it? LOL My country doesn't exist here :) I hope this is not P..tins vision :huh:

Those are the folks from Wetterzentrale.de ... They still use the same map. Looks like a 1980 map, too strange Germany isn't split up too. :lol:

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