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MattyB

SoCal Pseudophoenix vinifera trucking along

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MattyB

I don't remember ever seeing this Pseudophoenix in California. It seems to tolerate our climate just fine, but it is very slow, so I can see how that might make it a little tricky to keep from rotting out. It's exactly 3" diameter at the base and stands 4'-4" overall. This was germinated from seed in 2006.

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akamu

That is a great looking Pseudo v.i don't recall seeing any others growing in san diego. but I gotta say frog the dog is much more handsome. Great job on growing it for so long

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kylecawazafla

Beautiful! It looks just perfect! Hopefully no one is tempted to make wine from it!

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Pete in Paradise Hills

Slow yes but still faster than pseudophoenix ekmanii I think

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MattyB

Yes, definitely faster than P. ekmanii, which is on the left in the first picture

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Josh-O

Defiantly a very cool Pseudophoenix. Nice grow Matty, I'll see you in the morning at Swamis

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MattyB

Did you see me defiantly attempt that late take-off and almost crash right into Christian? We surfaced together, shoulder to shoulder. No boards dinged so it was all good!

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DoomsDave

Great Pseudo, Matty. Next time I visit, gotta pet the Frog.

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Peter Pacific

Very nice Matty! It's green and fat and will be gorgeous someday. Good for you!!

Peter

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Josh-O

Did you see me defiantly attempt that late take-off and almost crash right into Christian? We surfaced together, shoulder to shoulder. No boards dinged so it was all good!

I saw the whole thing happen!! I would of just plowed through him..lol

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Josh-O

I'll see you in the morning for the dawn patrol session

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JenRiot321

Hey MattyB I know this is an old thread but I was curious about how your P. vinifera was going in San Diego? I just picked up six young seedlings recently and being that I live in San Diego (College East) as well I was hoping you had some success with this species and some tips you could share! I’d appreciate talking to someone local and getting some knowledge, given that i’m new to palms.  Cheers!

 

 

Jen

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aztropic

Probably going to burst your bubble but P vinifera is NOT an easy species to grow outside of S Florida. You would be much happier starting out with its relative,Pseudophoenix sargentii.Similar looking palm with more of a will to live.I've killed dozens of vinifera before I brought back a 15 gallon plant from Florida that I've had some success with.It's been planted about 10 years now and is about 12 ft tall overall and a foot wide at the base.

 

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

IMG_20190415_132527535.jpg

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aztropic

Overall pic of the whole tree.

 

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

IMG_20190415_132552262_HDR.jpg

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Tracy
4 hours ago, JenRiot321 said:

Hey MattyB I know this is an old thread but I was curious about how your P. vinifera was going in San Diego? I just picked up six young seedlings recently and being that I live in San Diego (College East) as well I was hoping you had some success with this species and some tips you could share! I’d appreciate talking to someone local and getting some knowledge, given that i’m new to palms.  Cheers! 

 

 

Jen

Welcome to Palmtalk Jen.  Getting six was a good call as AZTROPIC pointed out, its a challenging grow outside Florida.  Matty will be able to provide you with the best local insight.  As with many of the temperamental palms, its getting them to a critical size that seems to be most challenging.  The entire Pseudophoenix genus is slow, which leaves one starting with a small plant a long window of potential danger.  With six to start and patience, you may have success.  It will be interesting to see how many seeds Matty started with to achieve the plant he photographed back in 2015, which was 9 years after he started with a germinated seed.  I'm not growing this species, only Pseudophoenix sargentii ssp saonae var navassana.  I cheated and bought a bigger plant brought from Florida so that I didn't have to wait or risk losing a bunch of small seedlings.  It too is a beautiful palm and worthy of a go here in Southern California.

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JenRiot321

Thanks! Great photos aztropic! Thanks for the insight. I only ended up getting them because I was getting a few other palms from the seller and he was selling the group at what worked out to be only a couple of dollars per seedling. I figured why not! It’ll be a learning experience and the worst outcome is that they die and I’m only out a little bit of money having gained more knowledge!

Any recommendations on what I can do to give these little guys their best chance of surviving?  Right now I have them potted in a well draining mix of fine orchid bark, cactus and succulent mix, perlite, and a coir blend. I’m keeping them on a mostly shaded patio while they adjust to being repotted and watering when the top couple inches feels dry.  Being that I’m new to palms I feel like i’m going to have to go through the whole “what works and what doesn’t” trial and error process that i’ve gone through for the other types of plants I’m interested in like orchids and tropical fruit. I’m hoping with the help of the community I might be able to avoid some of those same types of expensive mistakes! Though i’m sure I’ll still make plenty! Haha. 

Thanks for your responses!

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Tracy
On 3/26/2015 at 1:18 PM, MattyB said:

I don't remember ever seeing this Pseudophoenix in California. It seems to tolerate our climate just fine, but it is very slow, so I can see how that might make it a little tricky to keep from rotting out. It's exactly 3" diameter at the base and stands 4'-4" overall. This was germinated from seed in 2006.

post-126-0-22840300-1427401042_thumb.jpg

post-126-0-40520300-1427401052_thumb.jpg

post-126-0-02288400-1427401064_thumb.jpg

 

1 hour ago, JenRiot321 said:

Any recommendations on what I can do to give these little guys their best chance of surviving?  Right now I have them potted in a well draining mix of fine orchid bark, cactus and succulent mix, perlite, and a coir blend. I’m keeping them on a mostly shaded patio while they adjust to being repotted and watering when the top couple inches feels dry.  Being that I’m new to palms I feel like i’m going to have to go through the whole “what works and what doesn’t” trial and error process that i’ve gone through for the other types of plants I’m interested in like orchids and tropical fruit. I’m hoping with the help of the community I might be able to avoid some of those same types of expensive mistakes! Though i’m sure I’ll still make plenty! Haha. 

Thanks for your responses!

Matt, you have been summoned for your input... and no not on the surf report (onshore before dawn, so pretty junky by the way).

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