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vcross

"Lime Pindo" fronds yellowing in Dallas (Butia odorata/capitata)

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vcross
I have never posted here but have lurked for many years and have a question. One of my Pindo Palms (Butia capitata/ordorata) has always exhibited lime green leaves and bright green leaf bases. I planted it as a 3 gallon specimen 9 years ago.
Since I live in central Dallas, the palm usually never sees temperatures lower than approximately 20F/-6C. We have had one particularly harsh winter with temperatures down to 13F/-10C and 4 days below 32F/0C. The palm survived this with some damage to the central spear but surprisingly without spear pull. (All other Pindoes in my yard lost spears but recovered.)
Over just the last year, the leaves of this particular palm have been yellowing even though the other Pindoes in my yard have had no issues. I am guessing this may be a nutritional deficiency. I have given it general fertilizer before and a handful of Epsom Salt each year (Mg2SO4).
It seems to be declining. Any thoughts as to what may be causing this and why this may be happening? We've had a mild winter by Dallas standards so far.
I am attaching pictures of the palm as well as a nearby Pindo (30ft/10m) that presents no issues.
Leaf bases:
Sickly leaf detail:
Healthy Butia only 30ft/10m away:
16466784672_664f930afd_n.jpgHealthy Butia by vcross, on Flickr
Thanks in advance,
V. Cross
Dallas, TX USA z8B

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NorthFlpalmguy

It seems like a nutrient deficiency to me as well. Throw a few handfuls of Palm specific or fertilizer with micros in it.

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Josh-O

I agree, it looks hungry for a good fertilizer feeding

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Phoenikakias

It happens all the time here with the Butia spss. In fact it's very difficult that a Butia is kept constantly green. I think it has nothing to do with lack of fertilizer. Rather an alkalinity intolerance, I think it is the real cause. I would check soil's properties around this particular plant and in comparison to the ones of a random sample around a healthy exemplary.

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NorthFlpalmguy

It happens all the time here with the Butia spss. In fact it's very difficult that a Butia is kept constantly green. I think it has nothing to do with lack of fertilizer. Rather an alkalinity intolerance, I think it is the real cause. I would check soil's properties around this particular plant and in comparison to the ones of a random sample around a healthy exemplary.

Good idea.

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John Case

This also may be a natural coloration difference. I have 2 B. odoratas living 10 feet from each other, one is almost a ash-blue green, the other a yellow green,....they get the same care top to bottom......

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Palm crazy

I’d give it some iron.

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TexasColdHardyPalms

It needs fertilizer. I have to continually feed mine or they will start to yellow in the winter. I use the carl pool palm food that you can find at most of the nurseries around here.

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