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Mandrew968

Building a pond for the backyard.

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The Silent Seed

Nice Cichla ! Your catch?

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Pando

More progress pics... Thanks to Mr. Johnson's motivation, I am looking at a finish date of this weekend, rather than this summer!

Very nice! You may need some

gross-ingredients-dynamite-08.jpg

Edited by Pando

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Mandrew968

Well, we had a three day weekend and I was off yesterday, so you would think lots of progress was made. Well, sort of... In order for me to keep some of the nice rock formation, I have to get down in the cracks and grab out the loose rock by hand--pretty slow process and it wears out gloves like no tomorrow! I am down to my last mismatched pair.

post-5491-0-54234100-1424266165_thumb.jp

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Mandrew968

More progress pics... Thanks to Mr. Johnson's motivation, I am looking at a finish date of this weekend, rather than this summer!

Very nice! You may need some

gross-ingredients-dynamite-08.jpg

Yeah, maybe... this weekend as a date of completion was way off!

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Mandrew968

Looking really nice! Can't wait to see the finished product. Little waterfalls, bubblers, fountains, etc. to keep the water moving? Little fish to cut down on the mosquito larvae?

attachicon.gifpeacock 1.jpg

Moose, decent sized peacock. They are however too easy to catch--unless you are casting out, normally, with a lure; I am sure you know most people catch these large fish, when they are nesting--all you have to do is drop an unbaited hook and it bites it in defense of it's nest--nothing at all sporting about that! Also with live bait, I once caught 18 in 30 minutes, so that's not much sport either. Peacock bass are suckers for live bait--they cannot resist. It's automatic. With lures, you usually only catch small ones due to the fact that if a peacock bass has bitten a lure, it no longer will go for that particular lure(smart fish) which is why you usually only catch the small ones as they are still learning. In the deep hard to reach spots in the amazon, any lure will work on monster fish, as they have never seen a lure, so they bite on anything. Show me a snook or a large mouth and props will be given.

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Mandrew968

This is more of a reasonable candidate for when I decide to stock the finished product; red zebra cichlid. I had one of these fish in college and they are not only personable, but great tank mates with turtles--they hold their own! Not to mention beautiful.

post-5491-0-46536800-1424268694.jpg

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Mandrew968

Ok, back to the pond and progress...

post-5491-0-36056100-1424269195_thumb.jp

post-5491-0-73230000-1424269199_thumb.jp

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Mandrew968

Saturday was Valentine's day and my neighbor's kid's birthday, so we went to the park and celebrated with them. Lots of cake eating but no digging... Drobe got his face painted like a man :winkie:

post-5491-0-65840000-1424269253_thumb.jp

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Mandrew968

Tuesday saw 5:00pm come real fast, but this was what progress I was able to accomplish.

post-5491-0-10374400-1424269415_thumb.jp

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waykoolplantz

and how do you expect this to hold water ? Have you hit groundwater yet ?

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Mandrew968

Mike, with the shovel for a referrence, you can see how deep I am currently. Groundwater is about 8 feet deeper--doubt I have the strength and energy to go that far. But as far as getting it to hold water, I will see when I get there; I want some of it to drain/seep naturally so I can recycle fresh water in, at least weekly.

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waykoolplantz

You can always get few cans of that stuff they spray on the 'screen door in the rowboat' infomercials

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Zeeth

You can always get few cans of that stuff they spray on the 'screen door in the rowboat' infomercials

Good idea! That stuff is called Flex Seal, and I bet it would work well.

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Mandrew968

My first thought is, ooh-they have a clear flex seal. My second thought is ooh, the label says all kinda toxic...

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Pedro 65

My first thought is, ooh-they have a clear flex seal. My second thought is ooh, the label says all kinda toxic...

all sealers are toxic Andrew, and you are going to need a "Lot" to seal this project, keep yr kids "well away" from this area for days after you pour the sealer on..

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Zeeth

My first thought is, ooh-they have a clear flex seal. My second thought is ooh, the label says all kinda toxic...

This guy seemed to have luck with it:

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John Case

If you want to seal the pond, I suggest using a spray on product made of polyurea..... I put it over my koi pond shotcrete and it had not yet leaked after 7 years. It has to b professionally applied and is a bit pricey but I like the results. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polyurea

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Ken Johnson

Another option is the constant flow solution. You will need a drainage well and or a swampy area for the overflow. It is not 100% Kosher with DERM but I see many around town. I'm sure you know all this but I cant resits posting... :innocent:

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Moose

Looking really nice! Can't wait to see the finished product. Little waterfalls, bubblers, fountains, etc. to keep the water moving? Little fish to cut down on the mosquito larvae?

attachicon.gifpeacock 1.jpg

Moose, decent sized peacock. They are however too easy to catch--unless you are casting out, normally, with a lure; I am sure you know most people catch these large fish, when they are nesting--all you have to do is drop an unbaited hook and it bites it in defense of it's nest--nothing at all sporting about that! Also with live bait, I once caught 18 in 30 minutes, so that's not much sport either. Peacock bass are suckers for live bait--they cannot resist. It's automatic. With lures, you usually only catch small ones due to the fact that if a peacock bass has bitten a lure, it no longer will go for that particular lure(smart fish) which is why you usually only catch the small ones as they are still learning. In the deep hard to reach spots in the amazon, any lure will work on monster fish, as they have never seen a lure, so they bite on anything. Show me a snook or a large mouth and props will be given.

Try fishing with 6 lb test, then tell me how easy they are. An ultra light with 2 lb test is an absolute thrill. There is a difference between hooking up and catching.

I'm not a sportsman, I'm fishing fool, so I live bait. I respect those who use the lures, personally prefer having as many big bends in my rod as possible.

That pond would be a perfect home for a "pointy-tailed grouper".

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Mandrew968

Moose, you come across many saltwater ponds? :bemused: and I grew up on the water--won my first fishing contest when I was 7. Been there, tried that, caught it, released it.

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Mandrew968

Another option is the constant flow solution. You will need a drainage well and or a swampy area for the overflow. It is not 100% Kosher with DERM but I see many around town. I'm sure you know all this but I cant resits posting... :innocent:

Ken is on the money and that's what I was originally thinking.

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Moose

Moose, you come across many saltwater ponds? :bemused: and I grew up on the water--won my first fishing contest when I was 7. Been there, tried that, caught it, released it.

"Pointy Tailed Grouper" is a freshwater species

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Moose

Moose, you come across many saltwater ponds? :bemused: and I grew up on the water--won my first fishing contest when I was 7. Been there, tried that, caught it, released it.

"Pointy Tailed Grouper" is a freshwater species

And if you google it - you won't get the right species. "Pointy Tailed Grouper" is everglades 'slang'

Here is Everglades "Pointy Tailed Grouper" with her children

post-1729-0-01839200-1424361755_thumb.jp

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Mandrew968

Awesome! Thanks for teaching me something, Moose--did not know that moniker. Interesting that you mentioned this as my ultimate goal(not saying it will happen) would be a pair of these(Paleosuchus palpebrosus). Although the 'pointy tailed grouper' can be made into quite a docile pet, it's eventual size is a deal breaker. My Son loves to visit the Dwarf Caimans at the zoo and he thinks that's why I am building the pond :)

post-5491-0-21394800-1424363817.jpg

post-5491-0-39266400-1424363822.jpg

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Moose

This Boy loves to hug his little buddy

post-1729-0-19164700-1424367096_thumb.jp

Caimans are much more aggressive then alligators.

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tjwalters

I've noticed a lot of the homes in Loxahatchee have small ponds on the lots. Anyone know how those ponds stay filled?

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rick

I've noticed a lot of the homes in Loxahatchee have small ponds on the lots. Anyone know how those ponds stay filled?

Im just a little north of Lox and around here the groundwater is so close to the surface that if someone wants a pond they just dig a big hole. This time of year its only about 2-3ft down and during the summer rainy season its about another foot or so higher than that.

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_Keith

I've noticed a lot of the homes in Loxahatchee have small ponds on the lots. Anyone know how those ponds stay filled?

Im just a little north of Lox and around here the groundwater is so close to the surface that if someone wants a pond they just dig a big hole. This time of year its only about 2-3ft down and during the summer rainy season its about another foot or so higher than that.

We have a similar ground water situation here, but our ponds run a little bigger and the key is to dig a well as opposed to using city water to fill. I supposed you could channel roof gutters, and everything else to insure water goes first to the pond before running off the excess.

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Mandrew968

A couple updated shots.

post-5491-0-98534500-1425310088_thumb.jp

post-5491-0-24011600-1425310096_thumb.jp

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LJG

Awesome! Thanks for teaching me something, Moose--did not know that moniker. Interesting that you mentioned this as my ultimate goal(not saying it will happen) would be a pair of these(Paleosuchus palpebrosus). Although the 'pointy tailed grouper' can be made into quite a docile pet, it's eventual size is a deal breaker. My Son loves to visit the Dwarf Caimans at the zoo and he thinks that's why I am building the pond :)

And we wonder why Florida has so many invassive species now. :)

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Mandrew968

Awesome! Thanks for teaching me something, Moose--did not know that moniker. Interesting that you mentioned this as my ultimate goal(not saying it will happen) would be a pair of these(Paleosuchus palpebrosus). Although the 'pointy tailed grouper' can be made into quite a docile pet, it's eventual size is a deal breaker. My Son loves to visit the Dwarf Caimans at the zoo and he thinks that's why I am building the pond :)

And we wonder why Florida has so many invassive species now. :)

I remember hearing something along the lines of South Florida has the most plant species(introduced and native) of anywhere in the world, due to the high travel and great climate. This made me proud to hear; I very much enjoy the diversity we have in plants animals and people. Yes we have invasive plants and animals(and people), Len, but I have never seen a Caiman nor am I thinking of getting one anytime soon.

When I think of invasives I think of the paper tree(melaleuca), Australian pine, Syagrus romanzoffiana, Ficus aurea(strangler fig) and the Brazilian pepper(Florida Holly which we have Dr. Fairchild to thank) and though big problems elsewhere, none of these are a problem on my properties. I don't think of fish, or reptiles as invasive problems, though some do. I love reptiles and in my opinion, the more the better! Saw this guy, Saturday, while biking some trails by my house--certainly one of the coolest things around anywhere, if you ask me! Variety is a spice I love and use all the time...

post-5491-0-34532700-1425312024_thumb.jp

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Mandrew968

Here is a local--one of the biggest we have, if I am not mistaken. And the scar on his back is from those 'invasive people'... :rant:

post-5491-0-40753500-1425312312_thumb.jp

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Mandrew968

Ok, back on topic--check out my boy and his hose!

post-5491-0-02650800-1425312432_thumb.jp

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Jerry@TreeZoo

Andrew, what is the animal in post 71? I cannot tell. I am guessing you live close enough to salt water that you would fill your pond with that? From a well? I once knew a guy who had a small pond in his back yard on the intracoastal. He kept a barracuda in it, among other things. He just had a tiny little pump that ran from the canal into his pond. The pond overflowed and the water just percolated back to the canal.

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Zeeth

Awesome! Thanks for teaching me something, Moose--did not know that moniker. Interesting that you mentioned this as my ultimate goal(not saying it will happen) would be a pair of these(Paleosuchus palpebrosus). Although the 'pointy tailed grouper' can be made into quite a docile pet, it's eventual size is a deal breaker. My Son loves to visit the Dwarf Caimans at the zoo and he thinks that's why I am building the pond :)

And we wonder why Florida has so many invassive species now. :)

I remember hearing something along the lines of South Florida has the most plant species(introduced and native) of anywhere in the world, due to the high travel and great climate. This made me proud to hear; I very much enjoy the diversity we have in plants animals and people. Yes we have invasive plants and animals(and people), Len, but I have never seen a Caiman nor am I thinking of getting one anytime soon.

When I think of invasives I think of the paper tree(melaleuca), Australian pine, Syagrus romanzoffiana, Ficus aurea(strangler fig) and the Brazilian pepper(Florida Holly which we have Dr. Fairchild to thank) and though big problems elsewhere, none of these are a problem on my properties. I don't think of fish, or reptiles as invasive problems, though some do. I love reptiles and in my opinion, the more the better! Saw this guy, Saturday, while biking some trails by my house--certainly one of the coolest things around anywhere, if you ask me! Variety is a spice I love and use all the time...

Ficus aurea is native...

Also, some reptiles are doing bad things to Florida native habitat, like the Burmese python. Though I don't think any introduced crocodilians will cause that much harm. There are already breeding spectacled caiman populations in the everglades.

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Mandrew968

Andrew, what is the animal in post 71? I cannot tell. I am guessing you live close enough to salt water that you would fill your pond with that? From a well? I once knew a guy who had a small pond in his back yard on the intracoastal. He kept a barracuda in it, among other things. He just had a tiny little pump that ran from the canal into his pond. The pond overflowed and the water just percolated back to the canal.

Crocodylus acutus. I have a well with an industrial pump and 24 hour timer that runs 4 hoses. All fresh water. I have also seen what you mentioned--the guy I knew kept blue crabs in there until he was ready to eat them.

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Mandrew968

Awesome! Thanks for teaching me something, Moose--did not know that moniker. Interesting that you mentioned this as my ultimate goal(not saying it will happen) would be a pair of these(Paleosuchus palpebrosus). Although the 'pointy tailed grouper' can be made into quite a docile pet, it's eventual size is a deal breaker. My Son loves to visit the Dwarf Caimans at the zoo and he thinks that's why I am building the pond :)

And we wonder why Florida has so many invassive species now. :)

I remember hearing something along the lines of South Florida has the most plant species(introduced and native) of anywhere in the world, due to the high travel and great climate. This made me proud to hear; I very much enjoy the diversity we have in plants animals and people. Yes we have invasive plants and animals(and people), Len, but I have never seen a Caiman nor am I thinking of getting one anytime soon.

When I think of invasives I think of the paper tree(melaleuca), Australian pine, Syagrus romanzoffiana, Ficus aurea(strangler fig) and the Brazilian pepper(Florida Holly which we have Dr. Fairchild to thank) and though big problems elsewhere, none of these are a problem on my properties. I don't think of fish, or reptiles as invasive problems, though some do. I love reptiles and in my opinion, the more the better! Saw this guy, Saturday, while biking some trails by my house--certainly one of the coolest things around anywhere, if you ask me! Variety is a spice I love and use all the time...

Ficus aurea is native...

Also, some reptiles are doing bad things to Florida native habitat, like the Burmese python. Though I don't think any introduced crocodilians will cause that much harm. There are already breeding spectacled caiman populations in the everglades.

Native doesn't mean non-invasive; I consider the strangler fig to be invasive. If you don't that's fine.

I don't want to argue with you on the python issue--I have already argued with many people who cry "poor raccoons" about the 'issue'. I find it ridiculous that a snake can be invasive to anywhere. I see them as just working their way into the food web--baby pythons become food for raccoons and alligators to which neither is going anywhere. Whenever I see a snake, in general, it is a rarity and I consider myself lucky. I have heard about Caiman in South Florida, but also have heard about the Skunk ape--any sightings, anyone? Neither the Caiman nor Skunk ape is invading anything.

Having said all that, I wouldn't release anything out into the wild. I find that to be unethical and selfish on my part. However, all of the introduced reptiles I see, I really enjoy--wish I knew where to find some naturalized Tokay geckos; would love to transplant some to my house exterior...

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Mandrew968

I don't think any introduced crocodilians will cause that much harm.

Keith, I have heard of some Nile crocodiles being found in the everglades. On one hand, I would enjoy seeing these amazing creatures in the wild, without having to go to the Dark Continent, but I can also see how these could be a detriment to people, in the long run--ever hear of Gustave? Man, what an incredible creature!!!!!! So much respect...

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Mandrew968

I was able to work on it yesterday afternoon--nearly overheated! had to put a wet rag in the freezer for my head.

post-5491-0-38007200-1425648373_thumb.jp

post-5491-0-16332300-1425648382_thumb.jp

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Mandrew968

I am mainly digging around the bottom to make the deep portions deeper. The main rock formations you see, will remain; just going deeper.

post-5491-0-91492200-1425648552_thumb.jp

post-5491-0-63452500-1425648558_thumb.jp

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