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Mandrew968

Building a pond for the backyard.

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Mandrew968

Around Christmas time(late 2014), I finally got the wild hair to start digging my pond. Always make sure before you begin, you have a committed helper!

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Mandrew968

After every digging session, it's important to water it in--I would go as far as to say it's therapeutic.

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Mandrew968

It wasn't long before I knew it was time to call in the big guns for help.

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Mandrew968

Before long we had some kinda shape going! At this point, I was not sure whether I was going to keep the Bizzy...

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Mandrew968

At this point the rocky ridge that I am on, began to present itself.

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Mandrew968

Some of the rock has really neat natural holes in it, full of sand--the rest is very dense and shaving it down makes it look a lot like homemade macaroni and cheese; a killer look in my opinion.

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Mandrew968

It was my father's idea to leave the Bizzy and to go ahead with a 'panhandle'.

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Mandrew968

The panhandle portion is not even completely outlined yet(lots of work this thing is turning into!) but we still have to water! The rock formations are really gnarly.

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Mandrew968

Here is a shot of it starting to almost look like a pond. Last shot of the day. The big hammer drill I have been using is giving me carpal tunnel...

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Alicehunter2000

No liner?.....that's a really big hand dug pond!

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Mandrew968

No liner and I am far from finished. My rock is too nice to cover up with a fake looking liner-once I am all chopped out, I will stucco the places it drains most; I would like it to drain a little into the yard, natunaturally-maybe 10% of the entire volume every week? I can replace that with fresh well water.

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Alicehunter2000

:blink2: ...........so this solid rock is under your soil a few feet? .....bizarre to me.....I could put a gallon of water on the ground here and it would be gone in 30 seconds. So how does your yard drain?

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Pando

Even a solid rock can be porous and has some cracks in it. That's some heavy duty sealed ground there.

In my back yard I can dump a 5 gallon bucket of water and it disappears immediately without any runoff.

Edited by Pando

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redbeard917

How soon until the kids end up in it? It looks nice. I like the look of your native rock. So... Any plantings planned? Maybe water lovers like Mauritia, or non-palms?

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Sandy Loam

Wow. That's some serious hard work, MAndrew968!

... maybe a cascading fake waterfall at one end? If the water is basically clean, you can buy those kits which pump up the water into a tube and spit it back out over your "waterfall" over and over (assuming that you can pile up a bunch of rocks on one end to serve as the waterfall backdrop, and are able to hide the tubes behind plantings).

Just a thought. It may be a crazy idea, but those fake waterfalls are increasingly popular among "water feature" maniacs. It's a build-it-yourself concept.

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Mandrew968

:blink2: ...........so this solid rock is under your soil a few feet? .....bizarre to me.....I could put a gallon of water on the ground here and it would be gone in 30 seconds. So how does your yard drain?

I am on top of a natural coral rock ridge. My topsoil is from a foot to 2 feet depending where... my drainage like anywhere in South Florida (besides Sweetwater) is great. My elevation is about 12 feet which is high for us.

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Mandrew968

Jansin and I worked on it yesterday.

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Mandrew968

The rock is really starting to look nice. Still a ton of work though--literally...

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Mandrew968

And some of you may have noticed, but just in case, I removed that everglades palm and replaced it with this--thought it would add to the pond, eventually and also a great spot for this one.

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Pip

I'm loving watching the progress of this pond.

Is that rock limestone?

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Mandrew968

Yes. Pure Oolitic limestone. Thanks for the encouragement; this weekend should see quite a bit of progress.

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The Silent Seed

Very cool! I, too, am baffled at the lack of a liner - I'll be interested in hearing how long the water level stays where you want it to, before adding more water.

Are you going with fish? Aquatics / marginals ? Or just see what goes in on its own?

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The Silent Seed

Any updates ?

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Pedro 65

Wow Andrew, you didn't Ponder about this for long, your straight into it :greenthumb:

I can "very much" see why you want to keep the rock look, and "imagine" you will need a good 44gal barrel of stucco to keep it sealed.

All best with its developments and look fwd to updates.

Pete :)

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Mandrew968

This is what it looked like Saturday morning. Notice all of the deep holes are filled with mud--I cut trenches in the rock to funnel all of the sand and dirt into these areas(via watering) so I could use as part of potting mix for my nursery. Soil is expensive and why waste it?

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Mandrew968

And this is Saturday afternoon, after I got done washing the rock--before that, I excavated all of the usable dirt into 3 gallon pots for easy storage and transport.

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Mandrew968

Here are a few more shots to help show some of the progress. Yesterday, I contacted Mr. Ken Johnson and he got me RE-motivated on this project...

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Mandrew968

Very cool! I, too, am baffled at the lack of a liner - I'll be interested in hearing how long the water level stays where you want it to, before adding more water.

Are you going with fish? Aquatics / marginals ? Or just see what goes in on its own?

I am hesitant to say what will become of this, as of right now, due to city codes... I am just trying to get it to look like something nice--the correct term, codewise is 'grotto'. So don't think pond, right now--think 'grotto', for semantical purposes...

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The Silent Seed

Looks more along the lines of a mini brook type situation ? And that's a hell of a tough job! Chip away at it, no pun intended, and you should have some satisfaction one day!

IF water actually stays in it - you're golden. Otherwise, there are tricks you can use to make it less water permeable and you can have a kind of oasis. But - hell of a job.

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grant b.

I commend you on all the hard work. wow. good on you for trying to tackle such a tough project. with it being as shallow as it is, are you worried at all about water flow? I sort of envision some pockets of stagnant water and that could mean trouble with your insects there.

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Mandrew968

I commend you on all the hard work. wow. good on you for trying to tackle such a tough project. with it being as shallow as it is, are you worried at all about water flow? I sort of envision some pockets of stagnant water and that could mean trouble with your insects there.

I know it may look like a certain way, but drainage is never an issue here(unless you live in sweetwater--the only place that ever seems to have flooding trouble in South Florida). I am very much thankful for the praise and support from my fellow palmtalkers! I think Pete said it best when he mentioned stucco, though I am not sure how much I will need, in the end.

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Danilopez89

That thing is turning out huge. Looks like a ton of work. Its gonna look good.

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SailorBold

you can chisel out the shape you want.. maybe rent a jackhammer. Sell the pieces on ebay for Saltwater enthusiasts

that rock looks like it might be very nice in a tank!

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Mandrew968

I mentioned earlier that Mr. Ken Johnson got me motivated; He is letting me use this bad boy on my project. The sucker is no joke! Ergonomic in the gripping and very user friendly, but the beast is at least 90lbs and I am only good for about 10 minutes at a time--but that's equal to 3 days with the previous tool i was using, and it takes me about two hours to clean up the 10 minutes of rubble, made at each go.

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Mandrew968

you can chisel out the shape you want.. maybe rent a jackhammer. Sell the pieces on ebay for Saltwater enthusiasts

that rock looks like it might be very nice in a tank!

Ebay sounds like a lot of work and I am not a rock shipper... but I did have to get creative with all the nice sized rock, I was removing...

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Mandrew968

More progress pics... Thanks to Mr. Johnson's motivation, I am looking at a finish date of this weekend, rather than this summer!

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rick

Looking good so far. How deep are you planning to go?

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tjwalters

Looking really nice! Can't wait to see the finished product. Little waterfalls, bubblers, fountains, etc. to keep the water moving? Little fish to cut down on the mosquito larvae?

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Pedro 65

Lookn great Andrew, it will look schmick when its sealed and full of water, and now after seeing it grow in size I "guess" it will need "more" than 1 x 44 gal barrels of stucco or the likes to "really " seal it, keep having fun "creating" :)

Pete

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Moose

Looking really nice! Can't wait to see the finished product. Little waterfalls, bubblers, fountains, etc. to keep the water moving? Little fish to cut down on the mosquito larvae?

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