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jfrye01@live.com

Mazari Palm...anyone have any experience?

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jfrye01@live.com

Just wondering, I'm trying to find this Palm and I'm wondering if anyone has any cold data on it?

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DoomsDave

It's one of the toughest. It's from Afghanistan, which says a lot all by itself. It takes both high heat and bad cold well.

I don't think it's as hardy as Rhapidophyllum, but it's up there. I wish I could be more specific, since you are in a marginal place for palms.

I've got one on the garden. Here in California, if you kill one, you're either dead yourself or close to it.

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smithgn

All I know is, don't get the "Arabica" type. It has more of a bluish-green color and is significantly less hardy than the other type, which I guess is just called a mazari/nannorrhops ritchiana. Don't have any reliable cold data for what you'd be looking for, as all I have is the Arabica.

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sashaeffer

I have one I bought from Jungle Music. It's residing in my hobby greenhouse for the winter. Greenhouse has small electric heater to keep temps from freezing, but daytime highs in the sun can go over 100F

Seems to be doing just fine along with other stuff I have in there.

post-9928-0-61821500-1420319006_thumb.jp

Edited by sashaeffer
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SailorBold

I recently purchased some seeds.. which I will be starting tonight ! woo-hoo !

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Turtile

Just wondering, I'm trying to find this Palm and I'm wondering if anyone has any cold data on it?

While I've not grown it myself, I've seen it growing alright in Raleigh, NC which rarely gets below 10F.

Pictures here:

http://www.unusualplants.net/forums/threads/cindys-cold-hardy-palms-in-the-raleigh-nc-area.1135/

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palmhort

I planted a seedling of the 'arabica' (silver form) this past summer in a S/W location close to my foundation and it started to decline as soon as I did. Perhaps I should have kept it in a pot? By the fall, the outer leaves were slowly turning brown. I tried fertilizer, and adding lyme as I read that crushed lyme rock sometimes helps but nothing helped. Even though its covered and has C9 lights around it I don't expect it to come back at all. I might try the reg green form in the future.

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smithgn

palmhort- The Arabica seems to be very fussy. From what I've been told on here they hate to be kept in pots, they aren't that cold hardy and they're picky about soil and precipitation. Almost thinking about giving it away! JK

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Scot from SC

I don't have one, but for what it is worth I have always heard they can take a dry cold but not a wet one.

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tank

My arabica has been cold hardy into the upper teens for me. Seem to be easier to deal with as small plants in my humid summers as well.

As a side note, while I've experience some pretty cold weather in north Florida, the freezing temps are generally short in duration.

Also, both types of Nannorrhops seem to really like the addition of limerock and preform dramatically better with this addition to my sandy acidic soil.

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TexasColdHardyPalms

I have several small plants. They are VERY sensitive to root disturbance. I lost 50% of them when repotting. I have one outside and saw 16 degrees the other days and didn't blink.

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Josh-O

Joseph, You make a good point about the root sensitivity of Nannorrhops. I had two huge 15 gal's severely set back after they rooted through a 15 gal early last year. I shifted them right into 20 gal tubs. It looks like they will make it but they look horribly sad. This is one species I would grow on root barrier fabric. I also had over 40 5 gal pots all experience frost last week and they did just fine with no damage.

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palmnut-fry

A nursery in Corpus had them in their going out of biz place so I got two 7 gal for about $70/ea! I was so thrilled to finally be able to try these ( both had many pups on the sides). This was the silvery blue sort as I walked right by first time thinking they were Bismarckias. I planted mine after overwintering in my house last year in a well-prepared bed of compost and shredded peach tree that had died in that bed! I was hoping would be a good spot as it is the sunniest part of the yard. The leaves all summer began spotting, and I tried to avoid getting water on them, but when sprinkler's running you have no control. Summers here are dry mostly, so lots of manual watering starts after rainy season ( end of May). This past year was a bit wetter longer, but damn, the first cold wave last November really nailed these palms. It was a polar vortex situation, so it lasted several days. I covered it, but still lost many leaves. It now sits covered in ice & snow from our latest punch from old man winter! 70* they say by Tues, ironically.

I am not impressed, after reading so many books tout their hardiness! And, from what I've read, they are painfully slow to recover. I will give mine one more summer to recover, if doesn't do better then will give to my sis- in Corpus.

I think you would have zero chance of this growing in Kansas without extrordinary measures to protect, much less any other palm save for the S. minor. Especially after this winter! So looking forward to the warm breezy days coming soon!

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Alicehunter2000

Probably wouldn't move it ....got some small seedlings in pure sand doing ok. This is one of those palms that where ever it gets planted it should probably stay (for better or worse) IMO.

From what I've read these things develop incredibly long "tap" root (s)

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TexasColdHardyPalms

I germinated another hundred or so last week and moved them to 1 gallon pots over the weekend. I broke the roots on several plants just by DROPPING soil into the container with my hand. I can't stress enough just how fragile the roots are on this particular palm.

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SailorBold

How quick do they germinate? I started seeds some time back and still nothing..

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buffy

My Kashmir Mazari handles our wet cold better. As a little guy, it would lose its spear often, but quickly recover. It's gaining some mass now and having fewer problems. The leaves are rather hardy.

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TexasColdHardyPalms

About 100 of them germinated with 4" roots with the first stem above the media in 14 days. Bottom heat at 85- 90 degrees. I soak all seeds for 4 days prior to placing in the media. They germinate just as fast and easy as washingtonia.

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Mandrew968

In a wet climate, they are not so hardy--the Kashmir form is better with handling water, as strange as that may sound. My regluar form is doing alright, in my climate, though...

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Josh-O

agreed mandrew :greenthumb:

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Kailua_Krish

Hmm, Ive killed every one of these Ive tried. I don't think i'll try again.

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Mandrew968

Hmm, Ive killed every one of these Ive tried. I don't think i'll try again.

Yeah, I concure--they are not as easy as some portray them to be. Krishna, just an observation, but your photos paint a vastly different environment from the sandy hot and dry desert that these plants come from; for a palm that has adapted to such an extreme environment as where it is native to, to place it in completely different environment can often prove to be too much for this palm. If you can track down the Kashmir form, I would say that's your best bet and one that should work for you--handles humidity very well.

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Kailua_Krish

Yeah, I've thought about looking for it but after seeing the adult form in Selby it didn't really seem like it was worth it. Bismarkia and Silver saw are easier silver palms for me.

I tried mine in the back of our lot which is very sandy, hot, and dry (hydrophobic sand) and it still failed.

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SailorBold

About 100 of them germinated with 4" roots with the first stem above the media in 14 days. Bottom heat at 85- 90 degrees. I soak all seeds for 4 days prior to placing in the media. They germinate just as fast and easy as washingtonia.

Im still waiting on them.. I did not soak them.. they are on a heat mat too. Thank you !

I will need to investigate

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tank

Hmm, Ive killed every one of these Ive tried. I don't think i'll try again.

Man,

I hope someone who has one of these struggling in the ground in Florida would try and add some limestone to the soil around the plant just to test my theory. My N. arabica has always looked pretty good but my two standard N. ritchiana "silver" plants, planted as large 3 gal palms, went into a severe decline immediately after I planted them. These were beautiful plants purchased from a South Florida vender at one of the Montgomery BG sales. After few months I basically gave up on them. On a whim last summer I added some broken up limerock from the road in my "neighborhood" and BAMM, a few months later these things are back from the dead and putting up perfect leaves.

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Mandrew968

Hmm, Ive killed every one of these Ive tried. I don't think i'll try again.

Man,

I hope someone who has one of these struggling in the ground in Florida would try and add some limestone to the soil around the plant just to test my theory. My N. arabica has always looked pretty good but my two standard N. ritchiana "silver" plants, planted as large 3 gal palms, went into a severe decline immediately after I planted them. These were beautiful plants purchased from a South Florida vender at one of the Montgomery BG sales. After few months I basically gave up on them. On a whim last summer I added some broken up limerock from the road in my "neighborhood" and BAMM, a few months later these things are back from the dead and putting up perfect leaves.

I can tell you mine gets PLENTY of limestone.

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Phoenikakias

You got to try Arabica in deep pot filled exclusively with pumice. It loves it, I take all responsibility for this statement!

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sashaeffer

You got to try Arabica in deep pot filled exclusively with pumice. It loves it, I take all responsibility for this statement!

That is exactly how mine was bought, in all pumice and does fine and as a matter of fact over wintered just fine in my greenhouse this Winter with minimal water..which just runs through the soil media anyway.

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_Keith

So, I got two of these to try in Louisiana, the land of wet acidy clay loam. What I am hearing it to go get a few bags of builders sand, mound it up and plant in that. Right?

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Phoenikakias

I bet you do so Keith!

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Phoenikakias

Just crossed my mind. You got to be also extremely careful with plant's unpotting during the procedure. Any root damage would likely mean its death.

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_Keith

Just crossed my mind. You got to be also extremely careful with plant's unpotting during the procedure. Any root damage would likely mean its death.

Yes, I have heard of their severe reaction to root disturbance, up to and including death. The 2 have were very carefully packed and ship but are still unhappy about the trip here. I hate to disturb them again, but I know they will be better off in the ground than in the pots. Even still, I figure I have a 50/50 chance at best of these making it here. Unfortunately, the best places to put them are a good bit away from the house and it will be the hardest place to care for them.

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Jimhardy

In my experience they are extremely intolerant of moisture during winter

and the leaves will spot and mold if there isnt plenty of air flow.

The roots can be extremely finicky too,my advice would be to plant when

soil temps are very warm June-Aug.

They also like intense heat so you could probably put a cover

over it in summer to get the temps in the 100-120F range once

the roots settle in.

Edited by Jimhardy
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Mandrew968

Here is my neglected one--weeds and all.

post-5491-0-24644700-1425910512_thumb.jp

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Phoenikakias

I like it! It's the arabica form I suppose?

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Mandrew968

It was the most silver form I could find, but it's not fast... It's completely stable and I don't know why, but I keep dumping fill on the baby suckers at the base--maybe 4 or 5 of them, under neath the sand and weeds...

Can anyone school me on the difference in the various forms? I hear kashmir form does best in my climate, and have seen the arabica form in the nurseries(and in my coffee mug)--the arabica is the more silver form, right? Suppossed to grow faster too--had purchased one to give to my grandmother in Panama City Beach but my uncle planted it in some purple weeds and it was swallowed up, never to be seen again! Taxonomically there is but one species, but so once was the case with Beccariophoenix...

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_Keith

,,,t my uncle planted it in some purple weeds and it was swallowed up, never to be seen again! ,,,,.

LOL, I have been guilty of this, and not just once or twice. That is why, when walking around my property there are little yellow construction flags sticking up all over. And still every once in while when zooming around on the big zero turn one of us whips around something, and chomp, there it goes flag and all.

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tank

Here is my neglected one--weeds and all.

Do you know who you got yours from? I got mine from Claude Roatta/ Action Theory Nursery at one of the South Florida sales. Really nice plants. I'm pretty sure these are the "standard" N. ritchiana silver.

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Phoenikakias

''Standard'' N ritchiana silver? Is it actually the arabica or the kashmir? :bemused:

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tank

''Standard'' N ritchiana silver? Is it actually the arabica or the kashmir? :bemused:

Non-kashmir silver.

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