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Coconut Madness In ISRAEL !!!

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Stelios

HI Lior

Thank you for your kind words! My advise I can give you with my experience growing this palm outdoors is to try to keep it protected from the cold wind. Try to take advantage the house (place it near the wall) or make some temporary greenhouse. From my little experience the wind is what makes the biggest damage in our climate. I don't think you need to heat the roots because you have a bit more warmer winters that I have here. The lava rocks are good idea for the summer, but I think for the winter you want to let the soil dry. Try to give the palms as much winter sun as possible and don't water very often. If your soil drains good so should be O.K. Many of this information I also learned here at PT.

Maybe for me is been a matter of luck growing this palm. This year I didn't fertilize this coco at all but the previous 2 years I gave it a bit iron only. I should fertilize it at some point because it's planted in almost pure sand (even though the roots must be already in the native soil).

Keep up the good work as you always do taking good care of them and I hope the next step for you is to plant some in the ground and see them growing even faster.

Best regards

Stelios

P.S. The beach where the cocos in Eilat is growing looks very beautiful. I'm sure with more care they can grow more coconuts there.

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Stelios

The medals for the distance holders from the equator :winkie:

1. Paphos / CY: 34°46'N – Gold

2. Port Elizabeth / ZA: 33°42'S – Silver

3. Tel Aviv / IL: 32°05'N – Bronze

Thank you! But I think La Quinta California, should be the winner since the coconuts found there are bigger and grew probably without a lot of protection.

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Lior_Gal

HI Lior

Thank you for your kind words! My advise I can give you with my experience growing this palm outdoors is to try to keep it protected from the cold wind. Try to take advantage the house (place it near the wall) or make some temporary greenhouse. From my little experience the wind is what makes the biggest damage in our climate. I don't think you need to heat the roots because you have a bit more warmer winters that I have here. The lava rocks are good idea for the summer, but I think for the winter you want to let the soil dry. Try to give the palms as much winter sun as possible and don't water very often. If your soil drains good so should be O.K. Many of this information I also learned here at PT.

Maybe for me is been a matter of luck growing this palm. This year I didn't fertilize this coco at all but the previous 2 years I gave it a bit iron only. I should fertilize it at some point because it's planted in almost pure sand (even though the roots must be already in the native soil).

Keep up the good work as you always do taking good care of them and I hope the next step for you is to plant some in the ground and see them growing even faster.

Best regards

Stelios

P.S. The beach where the cocos in Eilat is growing looks very beautiful. I'm sure with more care they can grow more coconuts there.

Thank you Stelios,

I also think that the biggest problem in Tel Aviv isn't the temperatures .... but the winds are the ones i should be concerned about

I will try to make a shalter against them, If i would have planted them in the ground like i should have done this spring, they would

have made it without a problem since the wall of my garden can provide them a perfect wind protection, But now when they are

in the tall pots, their leafs are fully exposed to strong winds ... and making a wind shalter will be a big problem for me, We'll see what

i would have to do to protect them maybe ill try to move them to the pack yard, I will be tough, But ill give it a try.. Next Summer

they will be in the ground for sure if they will make it through.

Thank you for the useful tips (-:

Have a great week,

Best Regards,

Lior.

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Lior_Gal

Thank you Pal Meir,

But the real Survival test will be this winter, Well see at first if the 2 big ones

that will stay outside will make it through, and then another test will be

to place them in the ground.

Then we will be able to do a Coconut survival compatition (-:

Best Regards,

Lior.

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Cluster

In Lisbon there is supposedly Cocos nucifera, in the Oceanarium so one must draw the line:P, with enough protection they could go to Antarctica perhaps:D. The amount of time one can keep them is also subjective, one could survive one year and hold the record even if it died during the next year:) All relative like I said. The coconut in La Quinta along with the now ripped Palm Desert is the most impressive (in my opinion), but both still have some very high protection/micro-climate, surrounded by walls and heat sources. Stelios coconut is very awesome as well and the protection he is giving it seems to be paying of:) Previous attempts on these locations have failed.

By the way Stelios do you only need wind protection or do you protect it further if the temperatures go to low? Is it near a wall or another heat source? Thank you!

The Cocos in Tel Aviv are looking great, I hope you manage to grow them further and that they are successful outside, your collection is amazing I wish I could get myself a coconut for Madeira, working on that^^

ps: Does the coconut in Port Elizabeth still lives I have never seen a picture of it/them.

Edited by Cluster

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Stelios

Hi Cluster

The first winter I covered it all around with a temporary greenhouse. I wanted to keep it warm and dry but the sand which is planted in, was always getting wet after some strong rain ( the water was coming in from the base of the greenhouse). Last year (the 3rd winter in the ground) I covered the 2 sides that the cool wind is coming from the mountains and the top of the palm not to get directly a lot of rain. On the other 2 sides of the "greenhouse", the palm didn't have any covering and was receiving directly full sun all day. This way the sand is warming up and drying during the winter. I didn't plant it right against a wall because, the way my house is built, the palm wouldn't receive all day winter sun. I don't use any extra heating source. Other people might have better place in the garden against a wall (or the house) which the palm can get all day winter sun and protection from the cool wind at the same time. I will keep protecting it in the winter, and when is gone, I might plant something more easy.

I hope Lior in Israel, or other people in places like south Greece, south Spain etc,will manage to grow tall cocos one day like in La Quinta! As for Madeira, I hope to see the photos of coconuts with mature fruits (if they stop to trim them).

Best regards

Stelios

Edited by Stelios

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Cluster

I think if people put enough effort it might be possible in their gardens, not so much in parks or public places unprotected. The half green house you have made looks like a good compromise to get more heat and protecting it against the cold winds and rain. Maybe when the coconut gets stronger it will be able to go all year barely protected, the same holds for Tel Aviv.

As for the Madeira coconuts, if you looked at the last pictures the coconuts were already the size of a nice lemon in the mid of summer:(, but alas 3 days after they removed them and many fronds of all coconuts. I intend to post pictures of them in their current ugly state at some point. Thank you

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Brian Bruning

There are large coconut plantations in Oman. I want some of those nuts to plant in Palm Springs California. Perhaps you may find a source and let me know. They should be well adapted to your climate. They get humidity but not always as a land to sea wind (Haboob even) is quite dry. They are irrigated and produce an abundant crop of nuts. Seed provenance (home area) is very important botanically. The pic is off the internet but they sure look healthy. 559149725-traditional-tropical-outdoor-m

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Brian Bruning

Another Oman Coconut Pic.

15657308.jpg

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Brian Bruning

If nowhere else in Israel they should succeed around Elat with irrigation. Tourists would love them.

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Lior_Gal

If nowhere else in Israel they should succeed around Elat with irrigation. Tourists would love them.

Hello Dear Brian,

I had no idea that there where coconut Palms growing in Oman, I wasn't suprised though

since oman has a good and stable climate. Here in Israel we have coconuts growing in

Ein Gedi & Eilat (in tel aviv so far we have mine) one of my friends got one from my collection

he grows it near Caesarea i hope it will make it through winter...

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Lior_Gal

Hello My Dear Friends,

I know it has been a while, I decided to give you a short update about my Coco Plams,

This winter i am just too lazy, So i left them all outside, The smaller ones (ain't that small

anymore, Since they are taller then me) ... Are protected from the rain, But they aren't indoors

They Have Only small burns in some of the leaf tips, Nothing serious though, If it will get significantly

colder i will place them indoors, But my 2 Oldest ones are fully exposed to rain and to cold,

about 3 weeks ago, We had a Frost that lasted for more then 6 days (Temps where 7-6 C),

But all my Coco Palms made it Including the Hawaiian Talls that i feard the most about them.

I couldn't even tell that something happend, They all look the same.

So far so good... This spring I'll plant a few of them in the ground, I hope they will make it.

Enjoy the pics:

CocoBig2.jpg

CocoDwarf1.jpg

Hawaiian1.jpg

Hawaiian2.jpg

Hawaiian3.jpg

CocoBig1.jpg

Edited by Lior_Gal
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Potsie

Very nice. Med summers are perfect for coconuts but winters are too cool. But i dont know about israel you may have warmer winters than greek islands or southern spain. What is lowest temp you have during a winter? I hope those survive because they look so nice and i would like to see them growing for many years and see how tall they can get and how fast in cool to warm winter climate and if they grow during winter too.

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Vinc

Hi Lior,

thanks for showing us your perfectly grown cocos palms!

I visited Ein Gedi this September and was wondering if the climate there would be suitable for cocos nucifera. Unfortunateley I couldn't find any in the botanical garden. Do you have photos of them?

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Lior_Gal
8 hours ago, Potsie said:

Very nice. Med summers are perfect for coconuts but winters are too cool. But i dont know about israel you may have warmer winters than greek islands or southern spain. What is lowest temp you have during a winter? I hope those survive because they look so nice and i would like to see them growing for many years and see how tall they can get and how fast in cool to warm winter climate and if they grow during winter too.

 

Hello Postie,

You are totally Right, Iv'e been growing Coconut Palms for 2 years now... What i've noticed is that during winter time they may

push out a new spear, but it will be extremely slow process, But as spring comes along, Their growth rate is super fast, They

may Grow out new spear every 3-4 weeks, Israel is a bit warmer then the Greek Islands, And i assume its less windy as well

The lowest temps i can remember where about 4-5 C. We have frosts every once in a while, But i can say that even my Annona

Muricata which is super cold sensitive, Survived outside in my yard from the day it sprouted, I guess i have the right Micro Climate

in my yard that helps my Tropical Plants Sustain themselfs during winter time, I even had Mangosteen tree that i demolished by mistake

and it made it through last years winter. I do provide them the best care i can. and like you, I hope that they will make it through this winter

as well, The ones that are still potted in small pots will be re-potted in bigger ones since they are too big for the smaller ones.. we'll wait and

see...

Thanks for your feedback !

Cheers.

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Lior_Gal
6 hours ago, Vinc said:

Hi Lior,

thanks for showing us your perfectly grown cocos palms!

I visited Ein Gedi this September and was wondering if the climate there would be suitable for cocos nucifera. Unfortunateley I couldn't find any in the botanical garden. Do you have photos of them?

Hello Vinc,

You're wellcome, It's my Pleasure to share my Hobby with Amazing people like you Guys...

We all share the same Coco Madness LOL :yay:, It's very nice to know that you where in Ein Gedi

There are a few Cocos Nucifera that are planted over there, And also in the Botanical Garden in Eilat,

Another Specimen is located in the dolphin Reef in Eilat ....Somone Posted a picture of it earlier in this Discussion....

 

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Palmaceae

Shalom,

Looking great, you certainly know how to grow them! Here is one of mine in SW Florida.

20151223_092351.jpg

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Lior_Gal

Dear Stelios .....

I was wondering how is your Coconut Doing this winter ?

I hope to hear some good news from you (-: I would appriciate

it if you could post a few pics of your Cocos.

Thanks My dear friend.

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Lior_Gal
4 hours ago, Palmaceae said:

Shalom,

Looking great, you certainly know how to grow them! Here is one of mine in SW Florida.

20151223_092351.jpg

Hello There Randy,

Thank you so much for sharing the pic of your Amazing Coco Palm, It looks so healthy,

You are doing a great job, How tall is it these days & How old is it ? I was wondering how you protect it

during winter time ? I had a friend that lived in florida back in the 90's and he told me that it's gets Snowy

Keep us updated, I love to see it grows...

Cheers,

Lior.

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Stelios
3 hours ago, Lior_Gal said:

Dear Stelios .....

I was wondering how is your Coconut Doing this winter ?

I hope to hear some good news from you (-: I would appriciate

it if you could post a few pics of your Cocos.

Thanks My dear friend.

Hi Lior

It's great to hear from you again. It's been a while but it's good to see that your palms look perfect as always. They really grew taller and I know what you mean by feeling lazy to put them in the house. These pots must be heavy. Soon they will be so tall you will not be able to keep them indoors anyway. It will be interesting to see if you plant some in the ground someday.

My coconut palm is doing good. This summer made a big difference since I was watering it more than previous years. This is will be the 4th winter in the ground and so far this winter has been very mild. In December we still didn't have much rain and except of 2-3 days at the beginning of the month with low temps around 6-7c in the night, the rest of December we have day temps around 20-21c and night 9-11c. I still have to keep it protected under some temporary like greenhouse construction. If I don't do it it will be exposed to the wind which is coming from the mountains and is my biggest problem about it. I started planting trees around the yard to block as much of the wind as I can especially from the side of the mountains. I also planted some papaya trees near the coconut in order to use their trunks as poles for the temporary winter construction of the coconut. I don't want to make a permanent greenhouse around it because I don't know how big this palm will be and generally I wouldn't like to see this construction in my garden all year. I will also avoid to keep looking for bigger materials every year. This time I used an old sun umbrella with pieces of plastic nylon and this "greenhouse" is about 2,30m tall. I will try to post some photos of the palm tomorrow.

Best regards my friend

Stelios

 

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Palmaceae
12 minutes ago, Lior_Gal said:

Hello There Randy,

Thank you so much for sharing the pic of your Amazing Coco Palm, It looks so healthy,

You are doing a great job, How tall is it these days & How old is it ? I was wondering how you protect it

during winter time ? I had a friend that lived in florida back in the 90's and he told me that it's gets Snowy

Keep us updated, I love to see it grows...

Cheers,

Lior.

Here in South West Florida we usually do not have to protect coconut palms, especially when they get to this size. I planted this one 15 months ago and it was about 3 foot tall when I planted it. I have several others larger than this one, and one is fruiting. Coconut palms are very common here.

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Stelios

Hi Lior

Here are some photos of the coconut that I took today.

 

DSC02331.JPG

DSC02332.JPG

DSC02333.JPG

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Stelios

It's still pushing the new spear but very slowly.

Best regards

Stelios

DSC02334.JPG

DSC02335.JPG

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Mohsen
On 12/22/2015, 2:19:37, Lior_Gal said:

Hello My Dear Friends,

I know it has been a while, I decided to give you a short update about my Coco Plams,

This winter i am just too lazy, So i left them all outside, The smaller ones (ain't that small

anymore, Since they are taller then me) ... Are protected from the rain, But they aren't indoors

They Have Only small burns in some of the leaf tips, Nothing serious though, If it will get significantly

colder i will place them indoors, But my 2 Oldest ones are fully exposed to rain and to cold,

about 3 weeks ago, We had a Frost that lasted for more then 6 days (Temps where 7-6 C),

But all my Coco Palms made it Including the Hawaiian Talls that i feard the most about them.

I couldn't even tell that something happend, They all look the same.

So far so good... This spring I'll plant a few of them in the ground, I hope they will make it.

Enjoy the pics:

CocoBig2.jpg

CocoDwarf1.jpg

Hawaiian1.jpg

Hawaiian2.jpg

Hawaiian3.jpg

CocoBig1.jpg

Hi Lior

I have been reading this thread and enjoyed and at the same time  learnt  a lot...

I am not sure if you grow other palms or not ? If not I strongly suggest you to try other palms as well...with your climate you can grow many palms outside and of course inside...

I myself is a complete newbie here and 6 month ago I only knew Date / coconut / queen palms...

Coconut palms is really one the most beautiful one but I am sure you will find other types also very interesting/fun when you try them...

also Beccariophoenix alfredii is similar to coconut but more cold hardy ( see below picture of it)

I think your climate should be some how similar to our weather here in Sydney...

I took one coconut from New Caledonia and trying to germinate it as well :) ( 2 pics below - one been germinated by itself in New Caledonia-Mare)

good luck!

Mohsen

1.JPG.a37b32fb772ca11546743ae1170ca8da.JPG

 

cc.png

5674860_orig.jpg

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Danilopez89
On 12/22/2015 2:19:37, Lior_Gal said:

Hello My Dear Friends,

I know it has been a while, I decided to give you a short update about my Coco Plams,

This winter i am just too lazy, So i left them all outside, The smaller ones (ain't that small

anymore, Since they are taller then me) ... Are protected from the rain, But they aren't indoors

They Have Only small burns in some of the leaf tips, Nothing serious though, If it will get significantly

colder i will place them indoors, But my 2 Oldest ones are fully exposed to rain and to cold,

about 3 weeks ago, We had a Frost that lasted for more then 6 days (Temps where 7-6 C),

But all my Coco Palms made it Including the Hawaiian Talls that i feard the most about them.

I couldn't even tell that something happend, They all look the same.

So far so good... This spring I'll plant a few of them in the ground, I hope they will make it.

Enjoy the pics:

CocoBig2.jpg

CocoDwarf1.jpg

Hawaiian1.jpg

Hawaiian2.jpg

Hawaiian3.jpg

CocoBig1.jpg

They look very nice. :greenthumb:

I hope we get to see some pictures of them when they go in the ground.

Those pots look heavy. Good luck. 

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Brian Bruning

I'd recommend going down to the sea and getting a 5 gal bucket with sea water.  Give each palm a bit of a drink from these.  They are seashore plants and are used to it when seas get high.  The salt seems to kill certain bacteria that cause root rot in coconut palms.  

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Lior_Gal

Hello My Dear Friends,

It's been a while since I wrote you guys, So it is time for an update:

Well, I'm sad to say that most of my Coconut Plams didn't made it through last winter 

But that was due tue lack of attantion, and Lack for experiance, The main problem was

that i kept watering the coconuts even during winter time, this fact caused them to rott

and get a fungus that killed them, They where in a regular potting soil with bad drainage

so they died one after the other, Another major reason was the combination of low temps

+ undrained soil that caused them root stress,

I have a "Lone Survivor" from my second batch though - You won't be suprised to hear

It's the Samoan Dwarf Coconut, I managed to save it, And re potted it in a huge canister

with 40% Sea Sand + 60% potting soil, Lots of Lava rocks in the botton for drainage and

It recovered dramatically during the last summer, I already Srpouted new Coconuts as well

they Sprouted in winter time so they are not in such a "Good Shape" right now, But i belive

that if they will make it to spring, they will be fine, I learned much from my own mistakes

and im sad to say i red very little academic data about things i wanted to know from the

botanical aspect about coconuts , Since i was too busy with life, I have studied botanics

Formally in my Degree (B.Sc) and i love to learn and to read more about plants but

I don't have much time for it right now.

588c8ec6e7506_Samoan4.thumb.jpg.41d03364588c8ec4c9a36_Samoan3.thumb.jpg.051195a9588c8f2abff5c_MalayanGreen3.thumb.jpg.07588c8f3f425b6_MalayanGreen1.thumb.jpg.7c588c8f375f524_malayangreen2.thumb.jpg.df588c8ef4677ae_Samoan1.thumb.jpg.e04b597c588c8ec4c9a36_Samoan3.thumb.jpg.051195a9 

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Lior_Gal

So what is my Growing Status right now:

1. Samoan Dwarf 2.5 Years old (the Big one)

2. 4 Malayan Green Dwarfs (8 months old) - i know that unlike previews ones i grew

they look bad, But i know they will make it, I do take care of them.

I Will like an expert eye to look at my Samoan dwarf and I will need a good advice what may cause the Following:

1. It was fine untill 2 weeks ago, I never water it now only when the upper and under layer of soil is Completely dry,

    Since I learned from last winter that the water intakes of Coconut Palms Drops Dramatically when the plant's

    Metabolic rate drops during winter time, So it was fine and last week the leaflets tops started to dry out and

    "Behind" the dry parts the leafs start to turn black, like it's a rotting sign which really freaks me out if will loose 

     this baby im out of buisness !!! .

2. Iv'e read in some unformal site that Coconuts needs extra Nitrogen in the soil and Extra Potassium, So I want

    to ask the professionals among you, Those who know exactly what coconut Palms needs, Is it so ?

    I give them these days fish Compost and its also increases the soil acidity, But i also give them Red Worms

     Compost.

3. The Last 2 winters where extremely cold, Before those winters the temps used to be around 15-18C ,

But in the last 2 years there has been a major drop in temps and now they are around 9-16C

The cold weather has a direct influance on indoor and outdoor humidity, 2 years ago i could keep my

sprouts indoors without a problem, I used to spray them with water for extra humidity and they loved it

But these winters the indoor humidity was so low and the air was so dry, that even my water spray 3 times

a day wasn't enough, I had one important King Coconut that died since he was dried out, I felt like i wanted

to cry, i loved it so much :-(

4. One thing that bothers me a lot is that the leafs are chlorotic and it want you to take a look and tell me what

do you think that the problem is if you can, It will be highly appriciated.588c946b77c29_SAMOANLEAF.jpg.88a21970f94

Waiting to hear your Answers,

Cheers,

Lior.

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palmfriend

Shalom Lior,

when winter comes in over here - usually with temps around 20C/68F  some of our coconuts do not look really well at that time unless

you put some heavy steroids in the ground (some weeks ahead) they can rely on for the colder days.

But I know for sure - or let`s say be sure - that those temperatures are not the trigging factor for the yellowing/early browning of the lower leaves,

I really think it is the overall humidity and salt content in the air that drops significantly during our winter months and causes thoses damages.

(As far as I know, there are the Austral islands of Tahiti with relatively low temps during winter (around 15C) but their coconut palms

are looking great all year around.)

So, if I may suggest something in this matter, keep an eye on the humidity level (of the air) and maybe increase the level of fertilizing

just before winter starts - as long as you are keeping them inside. Once growing up and with strong roots in the ground they might hopefully

do well by themselve.... (just my two cents)

best regards

 

 

 

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DoomsDave

WHOA

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Lior_Gal

Shalom Lior,

when winter comes in over here - usually with temps around 20C/68F  some of our coconuts do not look really well at that time unless

you put some heavy steroids in the ground (some weeks ahead) they can rely on for the colder days.

But I know for sure - or let`s say be sure - that those temperatures are not the trigging factor for the yellowing/early browning of the lower leaves,

I really think it is the overall humidity and salt content in the air that drops significantly during our winter months and causes thoses damages.

(As far as I know, there are the Austral islands of Tahiti with relatively low temps during winter (around 15C) but their coconut palms

are looking great all year around.)

So, if I may suggest something in this matter, keep an eye on the humidity level (of the air) and maybe increase the level of fertilizing

just before winter starts - as long as you are keeping them inside. Once growing up and with strong roots in the ground they might hopefully

do well by themselve.... (just my two cents)

best regards

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Hello There Lars,

I do take care of My Coco Plams very well, I fertilize them on a monthly basis, I also Check the Acidity level in the ground, But there are some things i don't

really know Such as the phenomenon i described with the leafs.

It can be the Overall Humidity as i assume, Since it is very cold this winter and humidity levels dropped dramatically.

I don't keep them indoors these days, they are all outdoors, They won't survive indoors even with water spraying them every few hours.

l Appriciate you assistance,

Best regards,

Lior.

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Stelios

Hi Lior

I'm sorry that you lost some of your palms. Hopefully the rest of your coconuts will be better. I was thinking maybe spraying the cocos that you keep at home for extra humitidy could cause them rot. I'm not sure about growing a coconut indoors. I also have a new coconut which I keep at home. I bought it about 1 month ago but I don't want to spray it for extra humitidy. I only replanted it in sand and I give it very little water. So far is OK with the indoor humitidy. I know outside as you let them now they have better humitidy but still need good protection.

Regards

Stelios

Edited by Stelios

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GottmitAlex

Hello. Could the coco's have been over-fertilized? Or absorbed fertilizer during the winter?

In my very limited experience, 9C will not kill a coco seedling (in the ground). But seeing thet your cocos are potted and outdoors, have you checked the roots for waterlogging and/or fungus due to low temps? What type of soil is in the pots? Very well draining soil (Sand)? Or regular potting soil which holds a lot of moisture (which in turns, damages the roots due to low temps exposure)?

 

 

 

 

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Lior_Gal
On ‎29‎/‎01‎/‎2017‎ ‎21‎:‎18‎:‎12, Stelios said:

Hi Lior

I'm sorry that you lost some of your palms. Hopefully the rest of your coconuts will be better. I was thinking maybe spraying the cocos that you keep at home for extra humitidy could cause them rot. I'm not sure about growing a coconut indoors. I also have a new coconut which I keep at home. I bought it about 1 month ago but I don't want to spray it for extra humitidy. I only replanted it in sand and I give it very little water. So far is OK with the indoor humitidy. I know outside as you let them now they have better humitidy but still need good protection.

Regards

Stelios

Hello Stelios My Dear Friend !

I'm so glad hearing from you, Yeah It is sad to loose such a rare specimen especially in my area, Where everything is much harder to find.

I have no Coconuts at home these days, I had to transfer the Sprouts outdoors, Even in this extremely cold weather, they do better outside

then they are inside, Low humidity kills them fater then anything ealse, 3 of them still showing a little vitality, When it is sunny i let them

be in direct sun, When its raining i place them under a shelter, I hope that at least  2 of them will make it through Spring time, They will

Have a slow and hard recovery from this hectic winter if they will survive, of corse i will keep you all updated, I just got a few gallons of

Sea water, So i watered them even though the soil was already wet, But i belive its for their own good, Since the salt as I have learned

will destroy fungus, The Samoan Dwarf got a few more burnes But it's new spear is growing slow and safe, I hope that this year i will take

care of it in a better way so i will get at least 4-5 new branches with new, Green & vital leafs.

I am curious to see whats going on with your Coco, Please post an update of your own ! :-)

Best Regards My Friend,

Cheers,

Lior.

Edited by Lior_Gal

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Lior_Gal
On ‎29‎/‎01‎/‎2017‎ ‎22‎:‎33‎:‎28, GottmitAlex said:

Hello. Could the coco's have been over-fertilized? Or absorbed fertilizer during the winter?

In my very limited experience, 9C will not kill a coco seedling (in the ground). But seeing thet your cocos are potted and outdoors, have you checked the roots for waterlogging and/or fungus due to low temps? What type of soil is in the pots? Very well draining soil (Sand)? Or regular potting soil which holds a lot of moisture (which in turns, damages the roots due to low temps exposure)?

 

 

 

 

Hello Dear Alex,

Yes, It's possible, Since when i re-Planted the Samoan Dwarf in the Huge gray canister, I added Slow Relese Fertilizer, Then i figured that i put too much of it, so i removed half of

the soil i had in the pot, and re-filled it with new soil mixed with Beach sand, and mixed eveything togather so it will reduce the Fertilizer Concentration in the soil, Then i Re-Planted it

I also added Iron every once in a while, and during summer time, I added to the water Fish Droppings Fertilizer, that helps to sustain the Soil Acidity. The young sprouts are in a

regular potting soil, I know it was a bad choice, But i had no other soil at the time, I will change the soil to a well drained soil mixed with beach sand like i did with my Samoan dwarf as they will grow larger (If they will), I hope so.

Thank you Alex.

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Stelios

Hi Lior

Your cocos should be fine outside if are properly protected. Not only over watering can kill them but also the cold wind. My palm also was never at home even when it was small. It was always outside on the veranda in the pot in almost pure sand, covered from the rain and the wind, getting full sun in the winter.

This winter this year was more cool than normal with more rain. The palm is bigger so the protection which I made is not the best (it also opened a couple of times). Some fronds are exposed but the palm is better than expected. Is more yellow like every winter and some leave burn is not that bad. A few days ago we had about 0 C for a couple of nights in the area but I am not sure here in my yard what was the lowest. Here are some photos. I will post new update photos in Spring.

Best regards my friend

Stelios

20170130_151402.jpg

20170130_151452.jpg

20170130_151518[1].jpg

20170131_152848.jpg

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Lior_Gal
On ‎05‎/‎02‎/‎2017‎ ‎07‎:‎21‎:‎42, Stelios said:

Hi Lior

Your cocos should be fine outside if are properly protected. Not only over watering can kill them but also the cold wind. My palm also was never at home even when it was small. It was always outside on the veranda in the pot in almost pure sand, covered from the rain and the wind, getting full sun in the winter.

This winter this year was more cool than normal with more rain. The palm is bigger so the protection which I made is not the best (it also opened a couple of times). Some fronds are exposed but the palm is better than expected. Is more yellow like every winter and some leave burn is not that bad. A few days ago we had about 0 C for a couple of nights in the area but I am not sure here in my yard what was the lowest. Here are some photos. I will post new update photos in Spring.

Best regards my friend

Stelios

Hello Stelios,

I see that your Palm Looks fine, I also see that some parts has taken a beat from the cold, Mine took a few as well, But it was exposed to really hard conditions and super cold and

strong winds in the last 2 weeks, i do see more burned leafs, but you know what, It is a heck of a survivor my Samoan dwarf, After the last watering (with sea water) im not going to water it no more untill march, I think it will be fine, I will keep on checking if the soil is moist, only if its totally dry i will water it again.

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GottmitAlex
On 2/6/2017, 2:00:33, Lior_Gal said:

Hello Stelios,

I see that your Palm Looks fine, I also see that some parts has taken a beat from the cold, Mine took a few as well, But it was exposed to really hard conditions and super cold and

strong winds in the last 2 weeks, i do see more burned leafs, but you know what, It is a heck of a survivor my Samoan dwarf, After the last watering (with sea water) im not going to water it no more untill march, I think it will be fine, I will keep on checking if the soil is moist, only if its totally dry i will water it again.

Hi Lior. How are your palms doing?

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Lior_Gal

Hello Guys, 

It has been a while since I was here for the last time...So there are some good news and a few bad news,

The bad news is that most of my Coconuts are Dead, But I have started all over again and i have five now,

I was quite successful in growing them to a nice size in a pot, then I decided to do what i was supposed to

do from the beginning....Plant them on the well drained soil on my back yard where they are well protected, 

and that is what I'm going to do this year in the spring (I'm excited just from the thought) No need to say that

I will send pictures of the process...

No lets go back to the good news, all my followers knows that i used to have about 5-4 Hawaiian Tall Coconuts

I sold one of them to a guy (I had to many) and i guided him in how to grow it, At start we re planted it in a huge

pot, Mixed with sea sand and potting soil, then last spring we decided that the best thing for it will be to re plant

it in the ground, So we did a major operation, digging a deep and huge hole in the grown about 1.80 meters deep

80 cm in length x 80 cm Width, at the bottom we placed beach sand, for the first layer, on the second layer we 

placed beach sand mixed with red clay soil, then as we went up we added to the mix potting soil...up to 40%

after 3 hours it was planted on the soil, I was worried that it wont make it....but it had all summer to establish 

its roots system, and it wasn't small sprout either, Making a long story short....It made it through this winter

it has a robust huge trunk right now, Hawaiian Tall Fruits are Huge then they have the husk on, So just imagine

in the pictures how big the trunk is, the tallest leaf is about 4 meters in height, There where a few short storms

but it wasn't affected by them, the soil was well drained and it looks amazing, I'm sure that during this summer

it will keep on growing and get stronger and wider.

How are your palms doing ? Stelios ?

Hawaiian Coco1.jpg

Hawaiian Coco2.jpg

Hawaiian Trunk1.jpg

Hawaiian Coco4.jpg

Coco Malay 1.jpg

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Stelios

My friend Lior is great to hear from you again. Beautiful palms you have there. The big one in the ground looks great. We'll be looking forward for updates in the future. You have milder winters than me here in Cyprus so you should have better chances for the cocos. My coconut is still alive. This winter we had milder lows and it survived with less protection. Thats the 6th winter since it was planted in the ground. I'll make some photos tomorrow and post them.

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