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Coconut Madness In ISRAEL !!!

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nick

@ Lior_Gal

always interesting to see your coco collection. I'm very curious if one of your's (or all) are planted in the ground. :greenthumb:

Edited by nick

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Lior_Gal

Hello Proeza,

Thank you for your Compliments, I do work hard to keep my palms in the Best Condition I can,

I think that in Israel, the thing that can help and improve Survival of coconut palms during winter

time is the Micro Climate in the yard as well, I will try to protect the big ones that will have to

stay outdoors Next winter, the small Sprouts will have to stay indoors during thet time cause

they won't be strong enough to make it through.

How can you protect the palms outdoors ? thats the big question ... I saw that stelios did, But

I can't do the same thing since i have no room for it in my yard.

Cheers,

Lior.

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Lior_Gal

Hello David,

I'm already a palm freak...here we have a saying "You Can't chase off a Dove with a glass of wine".. :drool:

I saw the B.Alfredii and it really do look very much like a Coco Palm, But for now, I want to do my best

in order to Make my "Coco Palm Kingdom" dream come true in my small yard... You can be sure that

if it won't work out, the B.Alfredii will be the Next Candidate for planting.

Have an awesome weekend my friend,

Cheers,

Lior.

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Lior_Gal

Hello Nick,

You can Try and purchase a Sprout from E-bay, They have many sprouts

that they can ship worldwide from Thailand and other places like Hawaii

after beeing inspected to be Pests Free...I think you should Hurry up and

start in the Next few weeks, Since it will be able to stay outdoors during

Spring and summer, To get used to the climate, I recommand to Place it

in a pot first (that should be big and deep enough for the palm to grow larger

but yet small enough to be kept indoors Next winter)... after one winter indoors

you can plant it in the ground outside and see if it will make it through.

Stelios can help you since he is more femiliar with the weather in Cyprus then

i am.

None of my CocoNut palms are planted in the ground yet, But if they will make

it through the Next winter, They will be just in the right size to be planted in the

ground.

Good luck my Friend.

@ Nick

Did you find any coconut to give it a try?

Stelios

Stelios, first of all, congratulations to your coco palm. Nice that it looks still healthy. I did not try anything yet, because the lack of a free spot in our garden. I also still have a potted small B. alfredii and a small J. caffra in the ground. Maybe I will look arrround the next weeks to find a coco to keep it in a pot first. Let you know if I found one.

Edited by Lior_Gal

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Phoenikakias

Lior, what kind of substrate do you use in the pots for the coconuts and did you end up in this method?

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Phoenikakias

Lior, what kind of substrate do you use in the pots for the coconuts and did you end up in this method?

I meant HOW did you end up in the current substrate...

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Phoenikakias

Shape and size of pots has been selected exclusively on the grounds of accommodation of the attached nut, or there is also a more complicated reasoning hidden?

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Lior_Gal

Hi Konstantinos,

The Current Substrate that i use contains:

20% potting moss

10% Grinded Volcanic Stones

60% regular rich potting soil with ventilation materials

inside (it wasn't written which kind of materials).

Slow relese fertilizer.

And water absorbing materials (no info about them).

Before im planting the Coco Palms, I do the following:

1. I place a thick layer of Big volcanic stones (each one

is about 2 inch long) the layer is about 8 inches at the

bottom of the pot.

2. Pouring the potting soil inside the pot, and mixing it

with another type of fertilizer that ive got.

3. Making a hole and place the palm inside while leaving

at least 1/3 of the Seed exposed to the sun.

(as ive learned, you shouldn't cover it completley.

4. I water the Palms once a day for a few seconds each time

you don't wanna over water the palm since it may cause its roots

to rott. Specially if its in a shaded area.

Every 3 weeks to a month, I fertilize the soil for a bit, with a special

fertilizer that is lowering the PH levels of the soil, Since Coconut Palms

Like an acidic soil.

There is no Special reason why ive chosen the Current pots,

the Logic behind my choice was to get pots that are big enough

for the palms to grow a bit in them, but not too big so i will be

able to place them indoors at least for the first winter, Small

Coconut palms won't survive outside in the first winter in Israel,

Even if the weather is forgiving and not too cold.

When they get bigger and a bit stronger they may have a better

chance.

Edited by Lior_Gal

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bubba

Lior, Great to see and hear your enthusiasm and diligent action regarding Cocos nucifera in the Medd. region of Israel together with the other pioneers in the climate friendly areas of Greek islands.I have always believed these regions show the greatest potential for success outside of California, which is officially on the board with the Newport Beach coconut. I am have limited knowledge regarding the area of Nepal and Northern India reported in this article but intend to familiarize my knowledge with it.

Currently, based upon the continuing and rather avid interest in this topic, the "Champion" for the the greatest distance from the equator is held by the Cocos nucifera grown in Cape Elizabeth, South Africa. This location is approximately 100 miles further from the equator than the Newport Beach coconut but is aided by a proximity to a warm, Gulfstream-like current. The pictures of the Cape Elizabeth coconuts show them to be numerous and well-developed. I do not know if they fruit, but they certainly appear to be far more robust compared to the singular specimen at Newport Beach.

I am not familiar with the longitude of your location but would like to see how it stacks up against Cape Elizabeth. That stated, it really is inconsequential whether you are a "Champion" or not. It is the passion to introduce a previously overlooked variety to your area. Obviously, to us on this Board, Cocos nucifera represents the Holy Grail. It is the logo of the "Tropics". Your passion is greatly appreciated!

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Lior_Gal

Hello There Bubba,

I appriciate your compliments, Eventhough it's probebly not going to happen

But my dream is to see my Coco Palms fully grown with Coconuts on them

During the season, I will be the happiest person alive lol :)

I had no Idea that they have Coco Palms in South Africa, Its encouraging to know

it can survive over there as well, Im on a quest for the Strongest and most Cold hardy

Coconut palms these days, So they will have the biggest chance to make it through

the winter time.

I just added a link to a movie of my yard and My Coco Palms:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tO8PuYLiyOk

Best Regards,

Lior.

Edited by Lior_Gal

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Lior_Gal

Hello Stelios,

I was wondering how is your Coco Palm doing ?

My Small Ones have started to grow fast, Exactly as i Expected, They have grown 2 new spears

already and the season has just started (My older ones did exactly the same thing last year,

I have placed them Partly in a shaded area since the sun was too strong for them so some of

the leafs had burns, now they look better.

I would love to see some pics of your palm, and soon i will take new pics of mine as well...

Cheers,

Lior.

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Stelios

Hi Lior

It's good to see that your palms look healthy and growing fast. I see some of them you planted them in bigger pots. Will you keep them outside to grow for some years in the pots or you will be able to move them indoors during the winter? You have more hot days than here so your palms will grow more quickly than mine. Here at the moment the day temps are not so hot yet. Around 23-26C and the average humidity around 70-75%. I started to water it more now and I already see a new spear growing quickly the last few days! The previous frond which stoped to grow during winter is almost full grown. These photos were taken today.

Stelios

post-9419-0-62681900-1431444273_thumb.jp

post-9419-0-03221400-1431444333_thumb.jp

post-9419-0-95268100-1431444496_thumb.jp

post-9419-0-09834700-1431444677_thumb.jp

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Phoenikakias

Beautiful and very healthy looking! ΕΥΓΕ! Have you taken any precaution or other special measures during the coldest months and right after them?

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Stelios

Beautiful and very healthy looking! ΕΥΓΕ! Have you taken any precaution or other special measures during the coldest months and right after them?

Thanks Konstantino. Ευχαριστώ! Every winter I have to protect it. This winter has been more cold than usual but I covered it on the top from direct rainfall and from the two sides only. The other two sides were open but my house is giving protection on this part. March was still a bit cool but I removed the covering from the top at the beginning of the month. I only left one side protecting it against the cool mountain wind till end of March. The first winter in the ground I made the temporary greenhouse covering the palm from all the sides. This was the 3rd winter in the ground and I wanted to push it's limits. Hopefully I will not kill it soon!

Stelios

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Jose Maria

Hello Lior,

I saw your video and I congratulate you for the results with the coconuts.

I have to inform you that the small plant that you describe as a Mangostan tree is instead a "Zapote colombiano " as they call it in Costa Rica, Latin name: Quararibea cordata.

Lucky for you, these are fast growers, I had to cut down one in my garden that grew too large. The real Mangostan ( Garcinia mangostana) are very slow growers, forget about them. Even in this warm and humid climate here , they take forever .

Jose Maria

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Lior_Gal

Stelios My Dear Friend,

your palm looks amazing, Obviously you are doing things right and your hard work paid off

About my biggest palms, Yeah they are going to stay outside, I would like to plant them in

the ground but i have told not to do that with a Coco Palm that it's hight is shorter then 2 Meters

The temps here are about 25-28c with 60-65% Humidity that will be higher as we will get closer

to summertime. After seeing your plam in the ground, i can't wait to plant one of mine in the ground

as well and to see how it will grow.

the next few days will be intense for me since im studying for an exam,

I promise to take some pics of my coco palms as soon as im done with it.

Cheers,

Lior.

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Lior_Gal

Hello Jose,

It's Nice meeting you, Thank you so much for your compliments,

I am planning a visit in Costa Rica soon, You live in paradise (-: so lucky to have everything you need

to grow tropical Plants, Thank you about the information about the Mangosteen, My friend braught it

from Thailand as it is, Now its R.I.P since i pulled it out of the pot (I thaught it was dead but it wasn't)

Then i just figured it will be a waste of time trying to save it.

I guess that this will be the last time i will try to grow Magosteen or its look alikes LOL

I just planted Longan Seeds a few days ago, I'll wait and see how it will go..

Thanks for the information

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Lior_Gal

Hello Dear Friends,

So here are the pictures of my Coco Palms as promised, they arent the best pics

but its better then nothing, I do have a few questions for the Coco Palms Expirts ...

Coco1.jpg

Coco2.jpg

Coco3.jpg

Coco4.jpg

Coco5.jpg

Coco6.jpg

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Lior_Gal

Coco7.jpg

Coco8.jpg

Coco9.jpg

Coco10.jpg

Coco11.jpg

Now the questions:

Why do the tips of the leafs are burned off ? I have no idea, Its not only the leafs that made me concerned...the Stalks also has burn marks

what can be the cause ? Can it be too much iron ? Since i use to enrich the soil with iron (even though its been a few months since i did that)

There is also a new problem of yellow leafs ...that you will see in the last pic ...can it be a shortage of vitamin / mineral / Citric Soil ? I will appriciate

your assistance

Coco12.jpg

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nick

Lior, if the humidity in your region is maybe too low, brown and dry tips of the leafes can be the reason, nothing serious but not an eyecatcher. Just spray your palms with water from time to time or cut the tips off if you don't like it.

First yellow patches and then brown dots can be found if your palms were inside during the winter without direct sun. It takes some time to get used to the sun especially if it is strong as in your climate. Maybe the time of acclimatization was not enough. I would put them in half shade or slightly filtered sun as long as they are small and in pots.

Coconut palms need plenty of water but well drained soil in high pots. Until the nut is not rotten, the palm is fed by the nut. Nearly no extra fertiliser is needed maybe litte iron. If you fed with too much iron, free radicals can damage the roots, but I don't think so on your plants. So fingers crossed, carry on and let them grow... :interesting:

Edited by nick

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Lior_Gal

Hello Nick,

Thank you for your Answer, I usually have no humidity problem, Since its very high during spring and summer

But this year the weather is very strange, Humidity levels aren't that high as they usually are, So I do spray my

Palms with water specially during the night,

They where indoors during the winter, I didn't knew i had to place them in filtered sun first, So that just might be

the cause, I will take it into consideration for next spring.

I will keep them in Filtered sun as you recommended,

I appriciate your assistance,

Have a great weekend,

Lior.

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nick

Hi Lior, if plants are indoors during the winter, I would place them in nearly shade for the first 1-2 weeks and then in half shade to get used to the sun.

My experiences are, that most of the tiny plants except succulents don't like strong full sun all day because of leave burn.
Personally I don't like to keep plants indoors. I plant the tiny once directly into the garden soil with some protection against the sun for the first 2-3 years as you can see e.g. with my small Dypsis Leptocheillos x Decaryi.

post-5861-0-33866100-1432441479_thumb.jp

Edited by nick

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Lior_Gal

Hello Nick,

Very Nice Plants, I can see that you take a good care of them,

I will follow your instructions, Eventhough my palms are already

In a semi-shaded place, I will Move them to much more shaded

area, Since i hate burned leafs, I had no other choice rather then

keeping the small sprouts indoors during the winter since they

wouldn't make it outside, I can't plant most of my palms in my

yard, I have a place for maybe 2-3 of them, I have 8 as we speak

So ill have to figure out what to do with the rest of them...Maybe

I'll find a location with a decent MicroClimate and see if they will

make it out there.

P.S.

I like your Dypsis ...

Have a great Week My Friend,

Best Regards,

Lior.

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Pal Meir

Hello Lior,

I had grown up a “normal” green Cocos totally inside a living room in Germany with relatively dry air for almost 9 years in the 1970s. It died in 1981 because the ceiling of my living room was only 280 cm high and the palm was too tall. At that time I was living in Heidelberg (49.4° N; winter minima down to -18°C), so I couldn’t plant it outdoors. I have posted a photo of this palm taken when it was 5 years old. The substrate I used was weathered granitic loam without any organic matter. I didn’t have any problems with mites or anything else:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/palmeir/14625399720/in/album-72157636010262104/

And as reminder of that palm tree:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/palmeir/14656880617/in/album-72157646227159485/

As substrate I recommend a humus free one with lava pebbles and/or coarse sand. If your substrate has organic matter it may get rotten during the winter. And I used only a normal fertilizer for “green plants”. But the most important thing was: Don’t forget to water your Cocos even in the winter months! And a “normal“ Cocos will accept also hard or salty (basic) sea water …

Hello Lior, I had grown up a “normal” green Cocos totally inside a living room in Germany with relatively dry air for almost 9 years in the 1970s. It died in 1981 because the ceiling of my living room was only 280 cm high and the palm was too tall. At that time I was living in Heidelberg (49.4° N; winter minima down to -18°C), so I couldn’t plant it outdoors. I have posted a photo of this palm taken when it was 5 years old. The substrate I used was weathered granitic loam without any organic matter. I didn’t have any problems with mites or anything else:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/palmeir/14625399720/in/album-72157636010262104/

And as reminder of that palm tree:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/palmeir/14656880617/in/album-72157646227159485/

As substrate I recommend a humus free one with lava pebbles and/or coarse sand. If your substrate has organic matter it may get rotten during the winter. And I used only a normal fertilizer for “green plants”. But the most important thing was: Don’t forget to water your Cocos even in the winter months! And a “normal“ Cocos will accept also hard or salty (basic) sea water …

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Lior_Gal

Hello Pal Meir,

Your Coco Palm looked Amazing, It's so sad to hear that it died after such a long time indoors,

My Climate isn't as Cold as it is in Germany, I'm also living Close to the Costal Area of Tel-Aviv

(the Center of israel) so during spring and Summer months its hot and humid... The Palms are

Growing very fast during these months, Temps are 25-38c most of spring and summer, Humidity: 55-70%.

My palms are Growing in a regular potting soil with about 20% Potting moss, and also Humus every once

in a while. they have top and bottom layers of Lava Stones and I do keep them watered, they get dry

Quickly since temps here are so high...

I did had Mites Problem during winter time, But I took them out by wiping the leafs with water & alchohol Mix

I did got rid of them after a few times of this rutine.

Eventhough my ceilling is high (about 6 Meters tall) I can't keep them indoors for good, Only the small ones

are kept indoors during winter months, And the Next winter will be their last winter indoors.

I wonder if a seashore sand mixed with potting soil will be better then just an ordinary potting soil ...

Thanks for sharing the information with us,

P.S.

Why won't you give it another shot today ?

Cheers,

Lior.

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Lior_Gal

Hello Dear Friends,

It's about time for my Coconut Update... :winkie:

Well, It's been a Hack of a summer out here in Israel,

The Coconuts Have Doubled their size this Summer,

I used the best Bio Fertilizers which siginificantly Helped

Boosting their growth rate, I'm very pleased and till mid

October, I assume that they will continue to grow fast

Well, Enough Talking.... I'll let the Pictures do the rest..

Enjoy

P.S.

Stelios How is your Palm doing mate ?

I'd love to see some pictures of it and how it progressed

during this summer :yay:

Malayan_Big_11.jpg

Malayan_Big_2.jpg

Hawiian Tall 1

Hawaiian_1.jpg

Hawaiian_2.jpg

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Lior_Gal

Hawaiian Tall 2

Hawaiian_tall_2.jpg

Unknown Coco

Hybrid_Coco_2.jpg

Samoan Dwarf

Samoan1.jpg

Samoan3.jpg

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Lior_Gal

Kyle You are the man !!!

I was looking forward to see pictures of the Famous Eilat Coconut and there it is

Thanks to you, I have to say that it dosn't look so well, It needs somone to take

care of it, But It's alive and it's there, So for me it is only a motivator (-:

Where i live in Tel-Aviv the Humidity levels during summer and springtime are

high, My Cocos loves it (-:

Thank you so much for sharing the Pictures with us

Have a great Weekend,

Cheers,

Lior.

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Stelios

Hi Lior

It always great to see an update of your amazing collection of coconut palms. They all look great and they are growing fast there in Israel! Now that we saw the photo with the Coconut of Eilat you have another reason to try to grow some outdoors. Some of your palms soon they might be too big to keep indoors.

My coconut palm grew more this summer. I increased the watering more than previous years. I noticed the base became more fat and the new fronds are bigger reaching around 2 meters in height. This winter I will have to make a bigger construction to protect it.

Here I have some photos that I made yesterday.

Cheers my friend

Stelios

post-9419-0-37610100-1440130334_thumb.jp

post-9419-0-53671000-1440130454_thumb.jp

post-9419-0-73188600-1440130512_thumb.jp

post-9419-0-37928500-1440130763_thumb.jp

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Kostas

Very nice progress Lior! :)

Stelios, that coconut is getting impressive looking! Very well grown

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Stelios

Very nice progress Lior! :)

Stelios, that coconut is getting impressive looking! Very well grown

Thank you Kostas! Lior really made big progress with his palms in Israel. Great collection.

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Lior_Gal

Hi Lior

It always great to see an update of your amazing collection of coconut palms. They all look great and they are growing fast there in Israel! Now that we saw the photo with the Coconut of Eilat you have another reason to try to grow some outdoors. Some of your palms soon they might be too big to keep indoors.

My coconut palm grew more this summer. I increased the watering more than previous years. I noticed the base became more fat and the new fronds are bigger reaching around 2 meters in height. This winter I will have to make a bigger construction to protect it.

Here I have some photos that I made yesterday.

Cheers my friend

Stelios

Hello Stelios my Dear Friend :)

Thank you so much, Your compliments are Highly Appriciated,

And yeah, This year 2 of my Biggest Coco Palms will stay outdoors during the winter

and we'll see if they will make it..... Any tips ? After all you are more expierianced then

I am in growing Cocos outside, Your Palm looks amazing, Do you use Organic Fertilizers ?

from my expiriance it helps the palm to grow faster, All My palms doubled their size this summer

thanks to fertilizing once a week (Using BioFish - Fish droppings solution mix with water).

Another thing i would recommand is to place small lava rocks on the ground around your Coco Palm

it will keep the soil moisture up in the hot summer days and also it will avoid the growth of wild grass

and shrubs in the area around it, I always do it in my pots and in plants i plant in the ground, It worths

the effort :winkie:

P.S.

The Cocos in Eilat is nice, But as i can see in the pictures, It could have been in much better

condition if somone took care of it, It dosn't seems like somone dose .... but thats Murphys Law.

It's always great to hear from you,

Talk to you soon.

Best Regards.

Edited by Lior_Gal

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Lior_Gal

Very nice progress Lior! :)

Stelios, that coconut is getting impressive looking! Very well grown

Thank you Kostas,

It's about time that you will get a Coco Palm as well,

trust me there is nothing more rewarding then watching

a Coco palm growing in your garden (-:

Cheers,

Lior.

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Pal Meir

The medals for the distance holders from the equator :winkie:

1. Paphos / CY: 34°46'N – Gold

2. Port Elizabeth / ZA: 33°42'S – Silver

3. Tel Aviv / IL: 32°05'N – Bronze

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