Jump to content
Scot from SC

My Jubaea X Butia F2 Hybrid

Recommended Posts

Scot from SC

I bought my hybrid from Jungle Music back in June of 2011. It was smaller, in a tree pot which I think might be a three gallon size. It has been in the ground for three years and two months. The growth of it is very fast. I would put it on par this year with a fortunei or faster. The trunk is really getting thickness to it.It is not only faster than a butia, but it seems to take less damage in the winter. It sailed through the coldest night here back in January; it dropped to 10F that night. I did have a frost cloth thrown over it, but it blew off sometime that night. The cloth was over halfway off, and the palm was exposed. I highly recommend this palm! Here are pictures from this past Saturday.

post-10668-0-33341200-1412029106_thumb.j

post-10668-0-50075400-1412029157_thumb.j

post-10668-0-49026200-1412029198_thumb.j

Thank you for looking.

  • Like 1
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Palm crazy

WOW thats some great grow rate. I got mine as a little two year old seedling and is only about half that size and twice as old, LOL! Are you in 8a or 8b?

I’m in 8a here in PNW. Your palm looks Great.

Edited by Palm crazy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Scot from SC

Thank you for the kind words. I am in an 8a, but typical winters here are milder than that. The vortex gave us that one night of a low of 10 F. We have tons of heat and humidity in the summer. ..I think it loves the heat, even though I believe Jubaeas prefer a bit milder summers. The hybrid seems to be a contradiction to both parents: faster growing and more cold and heat tolerant. Do you have pictures of yours?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ben in Norcal

Out of curiosity, are there hooks at the end of the fronds? I have a plant that is supposedly a hybrid, but does not have hooks. I am wondering if it is BxJ rather than JxB.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Palm crazy

Sorry I don’t have a current pic for this year, but I’ll take one this weekend for yea. Also welcome to Palm Talk!

Ben I have seen BxJ and JxB with hooks and some without. But don’t really know why that is.

Edited by Palm crazy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Scot from SC

Thank you for the welcome! I look forward to the pictures. Ben, mine does not have hooks. I also have heard they don't always have hooks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ben in Norcal

Interesting, thanks guys. I guess I don't really know what I have but my suspicion is BxJ.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Scot from SC

I would think mine is a B X J instead of a J X B, but Phil said it was a J X B and its growth, especially the girth of the trunk, points toward the Jubaea as the mother. Is your trunk gaining size rapidly?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Mandrew968

Scot, your palm looks super healthy and the blue on it is sublime. Just a question(I don't know much of anything about Jubaea as we can't grow them and thus have never seen a real one in person) what characteristics on this palm, give it distinction over a regular Butia odorata? Thanks and it was my pleasure to view this thread!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Scot from SC

Thank you Mandrew! I bought it from Phil at Jungle Music, and he sold it to me as a J X B back in 2011. I have to take his word at it. I agree that it looks more like a butia, but I have noticed that it is forming a thick trunk at a young age, its growth is on par with my fastest Trachycarpus, and it tolerates cold better than my older Butias. My two older Butias had a little older frond burn from January. I was worried about not having hooks on its ends, but then some of the guys on the other cold hardy board mentioned theirs did not either. I think it would grow like a champ for you since it is not pure Jubaea.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
SailorBold

Thanks for sharing- Its very blue- more than I thought it would be. Nice man !

10F is a good number for me.. so you didn't add heat or anything? I'm hoping my trash can protection will be good enough.

While filifera will grow here the added benefit of this palm not getting palm damage in my climate is a huge benefit. Makes me wonder how much cold they can endure.

Looks great.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Scot from SC

Thanks Sailor. I appreciate the compliment!

Filifera will grow better for you than me because you guys are a lot drier in winter. I think the best for my area is filibusta. If I knew for sure I had a 100% pure filifera I would give it a go though here.

I did not add any heat sources. I figured the cloth would be enough, and of course, it came off during the night, so it may have spent hours exposed. The saving grace for South Carolina is that we typically heat up the next day. Just be careful with plastic of any kind. I always heard plastic would harm plants that it came in contact with if it was cold, and that it doesn't breath. If you use a plastic tarp, I would wrap it first with frost cloth or even a quilt.

I am not an expert on cold protection since I really don't push my luck with anything too out of zone for me. I mainly have bulletproof stuff like different types of Sabals (Minors, Palmetto, Riverside, Princeps, Uresana, Birmingham, Brazoria, Tamaulipas, Louisiana), Butias, hybrids, Rhapidophyllum hystrix, Trachycarpus fortunei, takil, and wagnerianus, and Chamaedorea Radicalis trunking variety.

I think I am going to try a CDIP and Mule next year though.

Thank you again for the kind words and for looking.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Palm crazy

Here is my pic of JxB F2. I did have spear pull on this one but it has recovered nicely once the summer heat started in July.

The bad thing about this planting area it receives no winter sunshine :rant: between October to March. Does seem to be a faster grower.

DSC00074_zps6f42880f.jpg

DSC00078_zpse8ffa50f.jpg

Edited by Palm crazy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Scot from SC

She is a little beauty Palm Crazy. Where did you get her if you don't mind me asking. Thank you for posting pictures!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Palm crazy

She is a little beauty Palm Crazy. Where did you get her if you don't mind me asking. Thank you for posting pictures!

Got it from Patrick in CA. Six years in the ground from a two year old seedling. Here’s how I protected it when it was younger…popup greenhouse. During the big cold events I only used one or two candles at night and that did the trick. In fact it actually grew a little during a few very cold events. LOL!

d8b893f3.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Scot from SC

Wow, that is too cool. I think it has grown well considering your cooler summers. We usually are in the 90s and some 100s here, so most of my palms love the extreme heat...my trachycarpus don't mind it as long as I keep them watered well. I think you have a very nice palm. I love the look of your yard; from what I see it looks very lush and healthy!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Palm crazy

Weather here is 10F cooler than you year round. Especially spring only 60’s to low 70’s, summer upper 80’s to low 90’s, in August to mid Sept. We are only in the 60’s now and heat waves only low 70’s. But hey it sunny here. When the rainy season starts its just one rain storm lined up after another…but (weather channel) saying that this fall is going to be dryer and much warmer. I hope so!

Thanks for the nice garden comments, it pretty easy to grow stuff up here…. Just not feather palms or heat loving plants. Your palms are looking Fantastic.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Scot from SC

Thank you for the compliments Palm Crazy. You guys in the PNW can grow some really nice plants that can't stand our heat and humidity. The rain forests up that way are incredible.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
SailorBold

Candles? Really?? That's interesting lol. Did you use a tea lite or something?

Clever.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
smithgn

Wow, such a pretty palm. I had a chance to buy a couple (I believe it was the same hybrid as yours), but I decided against it. Then again, the pair of J x B's I was looking at weren't as well kept up as yours were, and probably a little smaller.

And this certainly must be a contradicting palm if it's able to grow in the pacific northwest! Butias deal with the wetness down here okay from what I've seen, but everything I've read about Jubaeas is that they outright do not like the wet! Impressive what you've got going on there, Palm crazy. Keep us updated as well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Scot from SC

Hey Smithgn, did you find some hybrids locally? Thanks for the kind words by the way!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
smithgn

Scot- I actually got them from a guy in the Orangeburg area. Long story short, he's relocating overseas and he had dozens upon dozens of palms he was trying to find a home for. I actually wound up going with Gayland since he was the one who told me about the guy. Gayland actually wound up buying the J X B hybrid, and it was just one now that I think back on it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Scot from SC

What a small world! Gayland has some very good stock and prices, and I want to visit his place sometime soon. It is funny how palm folks often "travel" in the same circles.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
smithgn

Very true. We're all a bit of an odd bunch and somehow or another we wind up finding each other (ha!).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Palm crazy

Candles? Really?? That's interesting lol. Did you use a tea lite or something?

Clever.

Yes candles, LOL! The ones I used came from a dollar store and they were short fat candles in glass container. As the wax evaporated it would heat up the glass so hot you couldn’t handle it with your bare hands . Each candle was cheap and lasted 12 hours. They would put out a lot of heat. The store closed a few years ago and I haven’t seen anything like them here at any other dollar stores. They worked great for me when the palms were smaller.

Wow, such a pretty palm. I had a chance to buy a couple (I believe it was the same hybrid as yours), but I decided against it. Then again, the pair of J x B's I was looking at weren't as well kept up as yours were, and probably a little smaller.

And this certainly must be a contradicting palm if it's able to grow in the pacific northwest! Butias deal with the wetness down here okay from what I've seen, but everything I've read about Jubaeas is that they outright do not like the wet! Impressive what you've got going on there, Palm crazy. Keep us updated as well.

Jubaea do better here in the PNW than Butia. Jubaea tolerate all the cold winter rain better up here, I think the crowns are more tighter or something than Butia. But you’ll never see any real big ones here unless your in a good micro climate, which I do not have. If I was in a solid 8b exotic palms would survive here a lot better. So every 10 years I have to start all over with feather palms, LOL! And what happens up here, is after a really bad winter that kills butia the box stores bring more up from Cali and put them at ridiculous low prices so people like me are sucker into buying them again. $15 for a nice size 5 gallon butia is cheep here. :yay:

Edited by Palm crazy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ben in Norcal

So I got a JxB from Patric Schafer this weekend, and it looks markedly different from my other plant. I think I am settling on my original as a BxJ, it has much more of the Butia look to it. I'm going to try and post pictures of both.

The BxJ (I think.)

mdkIzKP.jpg?1

And here is the JxB:

N7fFjwn.jpg?1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
SailorBold

The opening leaf of your BxJ looks exactly like mine does.. the center spear is way way way thicker than my regular butia though.. opens a little differently too. Yours already looks more graceful than a butia. Beautiful specimen.

The JxB.. NICE!

These confusing palms are my favorites.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Scot from SC

I think my J X B has more butia coloring, but its speed tells me it has to be mixed. The trunks on these things get massive.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
edbrown_III

I got one from the very recently late Merrill Wilcox about 20 years back very little Jubea blood maybe 1/16 or so. Looked so Butia like until it got the trunk still Butia like but very stout trunk -- I reckon the only definitive way to tell is to look at a think section of leaf and compare to microgrphs of Jubea and Butia very distinct differences in the vascular bundle between these two . But a real robust plant with a massive trunk is what we want.

Best regards

Ed

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Scot from SC

Hello Ed! Thank you for your reply and information. Would it be possible to post a picture of your palm? I agree that this hybrid seems to be a great boon to all of us in zones 8 and even 7. Does yours have more of the typical Butia color and frond arch? Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
smithgn

Candles? Really?? That's interesting lol. Did you use a tea lite or something?

Clever.

Yes candles, LOL! The ones I used came from a dollar store and they were short fat candles in glass container. As the wax evaporated it would heat up the glass so hot you couldn’t handle it with your bare hands . Each candle was cheap and lasted 12 hours. They would put out a lot of heat. The store closed a few years ago and I haven’t seen anything like them here at any other dollar stores. They worked great for me when the palms were smaller.

Wow, such a pretty palm. I had a chance to buy a couple (I believe it was the same hybrid as yours), but I decided against it. Then again, the pair of J x B's I was looking at weren't as well kept up as yours were, and probably a little smaller.

And this certainly must be a contradicting palm if it's able to grow in the pacific northwest! Butias deal with the wetness down here okay from what I've seen, but everything I've read about Jubaeas is that they outright do not like the wet! Impressive what you've got going on there, Palm crazy. Keep us updated as well.

Jubaea do better here in the PNW than Butia. Jubaea tolerate all the cold winter rain better up here, I think the crowns are more tighter or something than Butia. But you’ll never see any real big ones here unless your in a good micro climate, which I do not have. If I was in a solid 8b exotic palms would survive here a lot better. So every 10 years I have to start all over with feather palms, LOL! And what happens up here, is after a really bad winter that kills butia the box stores bring more up from Cali and put them at ridiculous low prices so people like me are sucker into buying them again. $15 for a nice size 5 gallon butia is cheep here. :yay:

I know what you mean! It's hard to turn down palms at such a good price. I already have two windmills but every year it's so tempting to buy more since they're so darn cheap! So, what exactly happens with your Butias? You'll have them for 10 years or so and eventually a cold spell will knock them out? Do they get too large to protect?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Palm crazy

I know, LOL! This spring I got sucker punch by a nice double trunk trachy, I don’t really need another one, LOL! Never seen that before.

The old butia’s where pretty good size for 8a, the biggest one was 14’ wide and 9’ tall. All were to big to protect and three nights at 12F and 5 days below freezing was to much for them.

All most all of them started to recover but the next two winters were bad, so down they went. Took four years for the trunks to rot off.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
edbrown_III

Scot

heres a few pictures nothing spectacular --- just a few Jubea characteristics but its hard to see ---- this is about 1/16 or less Jubea depending upon how the genetics varied. --- I will try to get a few more recent photos

post-562-0-06889500-1412995522_thumb.jpg

post-562-0-19314100-1412995538_thumb.jpg

post-562-0-90211000-1412995553_thumb.jpg

post-562-0-56434200-1412995575_thumb.jpg

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Scot from SC

Awesome! Thank you for the pictures. It seems to have a looser form than a regular butia, even ones in the shade.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Moose
On 10/15/2014, 2:45:11, Scot from SC said:

Awesome! Thank you for the pictures. It seems to have a looser form than a regular butia, even ones in the shade.

Yours looks pretty cool. Any updates, i.e. photos?please

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Scot from SC

Thanks for the kind words. I just took a few pictures with a fifteen inch ruler for comparison. This palm keeps humming along!

 

IMG_20151229_105741.jpg

IMG_20151229_105637.jpg

IMG_20151229_110444.jpg

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Scot from SC

Here is a picture overall of the palm with the fifteen inch ruler for scale.

IMG_20151229_110206.jpg

  • Like 1
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
smithgn

Geez Scot, this thing is a beauty. Can't wait to see it in 5 years or so. And with the mild weather we've been having lately, I'm sure it's been growing a good bit! Jubea's love cool weather (so I've heard) and this is right down their alley.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Scot from SC

Thanks Nick! I can't wait to get Patric's hybrids in the ground next year and compare them to this one. Patric's hybrids have grown a lot in their pots since I got them earlier this year. Didn't you buy a few of his hybrids?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
SailorBold

Very nice... I have one although it looks a bit different.  The leaves are tough as is the spear..feels like tough plastic.  I didn't protect it during our recent storm.. but I will just to be on the safe side after we warm a bit.  This palm may be built for my climate.

How tough are the leaves on yours?  Your palm is fantastic !

 

IMAG1533.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Similar Content

    • tank
      By tank
      Its been awhile since I've posted a topic but here are some palm pics from my yard in Gainesville:
      Parajubaea cocoides x butia

       
      Trithrinax brasiliensis
       

       
      Trachycarpus principes
       

       
      Jubaea x Butia
       

    • donofriojim1
      By donofriojim1
      This next post is about more established needle palms in Cincinnati and Northern Ky. I also want to show how much microclimates in the same metropolitan area can effect growing palms. The first two pictures were shared with me by another local Cincinnati palm grower. This is the locally legendary needle palm planted in the year 2000 at Mount Saint Joseph University in Cincinnati during the freeze of January, 2019.  Since the year 2000, this palm has never received any special protection what so ever. It laughed off the vortex winters with ease. It even produced viable seed yearly. However, sadly in the spring of 2019, this beautiful palm was cut down by a landscape crew by mistake. However it is growing back slowly from the roots.  The second picture is the regrowth as of early March, 2020. No winter protection of new growth was ever given during the previous winter. I guy who shared these pictures with me online is the guy who originally planted this palm. 
      Now, I had lived for a couple of years in Boone co, Ky.  Paradoxically, a good chunk of Boone county, Kentucky actually tends to be noticeably colder than most parts of greater Cincinnati. Especially in the winter time.  In the town of Union, Kentucky one can find the Boone County Arboretum. It is a fantastic place for a garden lovers to visit. They have a locally famous stand of needle palm there as well. However due to their outlying location in the park, and Boone county being a local cold spot as well, these palms sadly struggle a lot more than other specimens north of the river despite receiving protective measures  that other local specimens do not receive.  The third picture is them protected for the winter in a cage of leaves. The forth picture is one I took of them in April, 2018 freshly uncovered and noticeably damaged. These are much more damaged than unprotected ones north of the river.  




    • donofriojim1
      By donofriojim1
      Hello all! I live in Cincinnati area and I have a great interest in hardy palms! I myself have planted needle palms and some sabal minor " McCurtain" in my own yard. I also have found some established needle palms planted in a restaurant parking lot. I spoke to the owner of the place and he said that they were planted in about 2009  and never receive winter protection. I am also aware that there is a needle palm that is growing back from the roots at Mt St Joseph University after being cut down by mistake last spring. It apparently was planted in the year 2000 and does not and has never received any special protective measures. I am also aware of some needle palms across the river in Boone county, Kentucky. I know that they are buried in leaves every year and they still appear to struggle much more than the unprotected specimens on the Ohio side of the river. It is probably a colder local microclimate. Attached are the sabal minor mc curtains, and needle palms in my yard, a sabal minor mc curtain seedling in my side yard exposed to all elements as of last December, and the established needle palms at a Cincinnati restaurant as of  late February of this year. Im curious, are there any other Cincinnati/ Northern Kentucky palm growers here?








    • PalmatierMeg
      By PalmatierMeg
      As I posted earlier this week, I lost my large, mature Sabal palmetto Lisa to lingering damage from Hurricane Irma. But I still have two juvenile Sabal Lisas that I grew from seeds collected from a Ft. Myers city park. I have high hopes they will someday flower and set seeds like my first one. Here they are today.
      Sabal Lisa the larger

      Sabal Lisa the smaller

    • PalmatierMeg
      By PalmatierMeg
      Please join me in mourning the passing of my oldest and largest Sabal palmetto Lisa, which has provided many seeds and seedlings over the past 5 years. I received it as a 2-leaf seedling in May 2008 from a generous local PTer. It started flowering and setting seeds around 2014. I believe but can't prove that it suffered some kind of damage from Hurricane Irma in 2017. It aborted its seeds in 2018 and never flowered at all in 2019. By then it stopped growing and fronds died, starting with the newest. Today we gave up hope for it and cut it down. First photo is of what's left of its trunk. Second photo was taken 11 months ago when it still looked its best. I have two juvenile Sabal Lisas left on my garden lot.
      Sabal Lisa RIP, Cape Coral, FL  3/16/20

      Sabal Lisa, Cape Coral, FL 4/30/19

×
×
  • Create New...