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Cluster

Cocos nucifera on Madeira Island

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Pargomad

I'm sorry I can't share any of those pics I found on Instagram simply because they're not mine and I can't find them anymore... Ahahah

When I said I wasn't sure if you could buy a cocos there, I meant buying a large one in a garden center like for example the howeas or archontopheonixes or any other palmtrees you find quite easily on the island.

I wish coconut palms were more popular and common on Madeira island as in the Canary islands.

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Cluster

Thank you anyway, maybe one day I will find them myself or someone else will remember to share them.

Since coconuts seem to be doing ok all over the south coast (though I still need to ask someone to check the dwarf from time to time to see how the little coconuts are doing) I wondered, is it possible breadfruit in the warmest places on the island?

Bear in mind Funchal is not the warmest, for example official station in Ponta do Sol is half degree or so warmer in mean temperature than Funchal and there are reasons to believe some places in the southwest coast are even warmer. I have also noticed that Funchal has very low wind speeds on average, even compared to other macaronesian islands.

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Mr. Coconut Palm

Hi Cluster,

I am glad I could be of help to you with the information. I think if you could ever get any, that the pure Indian Tall variety of coconut palm from the area around Delhi, India is probably the most cold hardy variety in the world. I estimate this variety to be hardy down to 25F when it has some size and is established, since north central India I believe gets down into the upper 20'sF each winter, and they grow there. This is likely the variety that was spoken of in one of the above posts that is planted near the base of the Himalayan Mountains. The second most cold hardy variety I believe is the pure Mexican Tall variety from the Gulf Coast of Mexico. I estimate it to be cold hardy down to 26F when it is established and has some size to it. I know of two very large ones (about 45 - 50 feet tall in overall height with trunks about 25 -30 feet tall) growing in the lawn of a small motel in Brownsville, Texas in the Rio Grande Valley, about 3 hours south of me. These two palms made it through the Christmas snowstorm in Brownsville in 2004 ( the first time measurable snowfall was recorded in Brownsville in 105 years) and through at least two winters in the last 10 -15 years in which the lowest temperatures dropped down into the 27F -28F range, and yet they fully recovered and looked fine until they acquired Lethal Yellowing disease in the last few months.

Tall varieties are slightly more cold hardy than dwarfs and have a more robust growth pattern, as well as can grow in poor soils and even thrive in beach sand. Dwarf varieties on the other hand are slightly less cold hardy, but produce their first coconuts often when their trunks are only about 3 feet tall, and are more compact in their growth habits, making them more suitable for smaller yards. They are much more resistant to Lethal Yellowing than the talls, but need a more nutrient rich soil with organic matter and some fertilizer (preferably organic) to look their best. So, there are advantages to both varieties, depending on what you are looking for.

John

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Phoenikakias

Hi Cluster,

I am glad I could be of help to you with the information. I think if you could ever get any, that the pure Indian Tall variety of coconut palm from the area around Delhi, India is probably the most cold hardy variety in the world. I estimate this variety to be hardy down to 25F when it has some size and is established, since north central India I believe gets down into the upper 20'sF each winter, and they grow there. This is likely the variety that was spoken of in one of the above posts that is planted near the base of the Himalayan Mountains. The second most cold hardy variety I believe is the pure Mexican Tall variety from the Gulf Coast of Mexico. I estimate it to be cold hardy down to 26F when it is established and has some size to it. I know of two very large ones (about 45 - 50 feet tall in overall height with trunks about 25 -30 feet tall) growing in the lawn of a small motel in Brownsville, Texas in the Rio Grande Valley, about 3 hours south of me. These two palms made it through the Christmas snowstorm in Brownsville in 2004 ( the first time measurable snowfall was recorded in Brownsville in 105 years) and through at least two winters in the last 10 -15 years in which the lowest temperatures dropped down into the 27F -28F range, and yet they fully recovered and looked fine until they acquired Lethal Yellowing disease in the last few months.

Tall varieties are slightly more cold hardy than dwarfs and have a more robust growth pattern, as well as can grow in poor soils and even thrive in beach sand. Dwarf varieties on the other hand are slightly less cold hardy, but produce their first coconuts often when their trunks are only about 3 feet tall, and are more compact in their growth habits, making them more suitable for smaller yards. They are much more resistant to Lethal Yellowing than the talls, but need a more nutrient rich soil with organic matter and some fertilizer (preferably organic) to look their best. So, there are advantages to both varieties, depending on what you are looking for.

John

Mr Coconut, If I remember corerctly you have suggested in another topic the application of a fungicide twice during the cool/wet period on coconuts. Unfortunately I can not find easily this old topic, could you please therefore repeat this information in this topic please?

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Cluster

John thank you again for the information. It is amazing they could endure such cold when I have been reading stories where people lost them at 35-40f (maybe it was more than just a night like that?). I think dwarves might be my best option because I would not need another coconut tree nearby to have coconuts. Since the lowest recorded temperature in Funchal is 7.4 degrees, I think the dwarf will be ok.

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Pargomad

Hey ! I need you guys aahhaha I hope you can help me with this palm tree I found on Google street view in Madalena do mar, Madeira. I'm not sure if it's a coconut tree. Here's the link: https://www.google.ch/maps/@32.6929151,-17.1245266,3a,46.3y,198.29h,87.57t/data=!3m4!1e1!3m2!1sLQbme4JN3kIiBrOD68xBuw!2e0?hl=fr

It is just under the Ficus trees on the beach. I believe there is another one just next to the first one. I can see its leaves and trunk.

Thanks :)

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Cluster

Pargomad this year I actually saw that Ficus and went to the beach near those fishing boats! I am not sure what that palm is but would it not be bad for a coconut to stay in shade?

Edited by Cluster

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Pargomad

I think it's bad for a cocos to stay in shade... I don't know who had the idea of planting them there -.-

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Mr. Coconut Palm

Phoenikakias, you are referring to my earlier posts about copper fungicide. I suggest using it on coconut palms grown in marginal climates, where they are exposed to cool winter temperatures, especially where they are exposed to cool damp temperatures in the winter. They do not like being cool for prolonged periods, and especially do not like being cool and wet or damp. Florida's dry season coincides with winter, so when Central and South Florida have a cold spell, it is usually dry and short lived, which is why Jamaican Tall coconut palms can be grown as far north as Tarpon Springs near the Gulf of Mexico on the west coast of Florida and as far north as the area near Daytona Beach on the east coast of Florida, with the Malayan Dwarfs being grown slightly south of these locations. If you are experiencing a cool winter, you can apply the copper fungicide as a foliar spray on the crown of the palms in late November or early December, again in January, and again in mid to late February. I use a copper based fungicide made by Bonide approved for organic gardening because I grow everything I have organically. Be careful not to apply too much of this fungicide over time, because I have read that palms can develop a copper toxicity. Copper fungicide is good for treating cold damaged palms that have been damaged by freezing weather too to prevent bud rot, which is what can kill them during prolonged cool weather.

Cluster, for coconut palms to be healthy and grow well, they need an average soil temperature of at least 60F year round. They can handle brief periods of soil temps in the 57F to 59F range, which is why we can grow them to a limited extent here on the east side of Corpus Christ in Texas (near the moderating effects of the water). For about 3 weeks, our average soil temps in January can drop to these levels in a normal winter. This is why it is almost impossible to succesfully grow coconut palms in Southern California, even in coastal areas that never have freezing weather. Even though it never freezes in coast S. California, their average temps are just way too cool for too long from about mid November to mid February, causing their average soil temps to be in the mid to upper 50'sF for about 3 straight months, as opposed to only about 3 weeks where I live. Coconut palms, even the Malayan Dwarf varieties can take a quick freeze as low as 28F or 29F for a few hours when they have a little size to them easier than they can handle prolonged cool damp temperaturs in the 40'sF and 50'sF. Unfortunately for those wanting to grow coconut palms in S. California, their wet rainy season coincides with their cool winter temperatures. One variety that everyone living in a marginal climate should avoid trying to grow is the Fiji Dwarf. Initial trials of it in Florida are showing that it may be 100% resistant to Lethal Yellowing, but the downside of this variety is that it is one of the least cold hardy varieties. It is one that would probably die from several nights in a row in the low to mid 30's, and is probably only hardy to a one time exposure to a light freeze of 30F. The ones that you have heard of dying in temps of 35F to 40F are probably this variety and other South Pacific Island varieties that are very young palms only about 2 to 3ft. tall. I have found with my coconut palms here in Corpus Christ it is better to plant ones with an overall height of about 8 to 12ft. tall that are starting to produce a little bit of woody trunk at the base. Ones that are this size are a little stronger and can withstand a little more cold than ones that are only about 2 to 3ft. tall. I don't suggest planting ones that are much larger than 8 to 12ft. though, since adult palms cost a lot of money, are difficult to transport and often do not establish as easily as the ones in the 8 to 12ft. range do. This seems to be the optimum size to plant for those of us living in marginal climates. Also, to naturally increase the soil temperature, add organic matter like 100% organic compost to the soil when panting them and apply mulch around the root zone once or twice a year (but don't pile up mulch around the trunk itself, start the mulch a few inches away from the trunk). The increased organic matter in the soil adds nutrients to the soil and causes increased microbial activity in the soil, which heats it up by probably a couple of degrees F. Sorry for the use of these measurements for those of you from Europe and elsewhere, but the metric system never caught on here in the U.S. and I would have to look up the numbers to translate them to Celsius. By the way Cluster, what are your normal high and low temps for Jan. (or the coldest month) there on your island? Another bit of helpful info is DO NOT WATER YOUR COCONUT PALMS TOO MUCH IN COOLER WINTER TIME WEATHER! Here in Corpus Christi, I only water mine that are in the ground about once every 4 to 5 weeks in the winter. I learned that lesson the hard way.

Parmogad, in reference to the palm growing in the shade under the ficus tree, it looks like a sun starved weak coconut palm. The trunk of one that tall should have a couple of more inches width at least. If it is a coconut palm, it should be dug up, placed in a large pot, and gradually over about 5 to 6 months moved into more sunlight. Then after it has produced some new leaves in the sun, it can be replanted in the ground in a sunnier location. Coconut palms and other sun loving palms that are grown in very shady conditions, develop extra long weak leaves as they desperately try to reach the sun, and they develop very skinny weak trunks.

John

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Cluster

Thank you again John for the detailed explanation. The lowest recorded temperature for Funchal is 45.32 f (official weather station being 58 m/190 feet above sea level). The coldest month in Madeira is actually not January but February, Madeira and Canaries have a prolonged spring and delayed summer. The normal low temperatures for Funchal closer to the coast are around 57 f and highs 66-69. The garden I showed you is close to the sea as you can see but at 447 feet.

That coconut Pargomad showed us.. I can assure you it is in full shade, that ficus is giant. The ficus/sea is facing south/southwest blocking the only source of light. I believe even in good climates for coconuts to grow in a healthy way they need sun right John?

I checked southern California to compare (San Diego) and the record lows are below freezing temperatures, of course that probably only happens once in many years:) .

Edited by Cluster

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Phoenikakias

Thanks John for those information! I suppose that what your recommendation about application of a copper fungicide is adjusted to your very own climate? I mean number of application and specific months refer to the coldest and wettest months during the year? In other words a more general advice could it be: apply such a fungicide on a monthly base during coldest and wettest months (whichever and how many these may be)? Of course I do not intend to try out a coconut in my place (that would be science fiction) but rather I consider a fungicide treatment for outplanted Medemia.

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Cluster

I forgot to mention that "The normal low temperatures for Funchal closer to the coast are around 57 f and highs 66-69" are for the coldest month (February). I also noticed that the picture where I zoomed in the inflorescence one can notice a cut frond, hopefully they are not overdoing it, in the picture from last year the palm seemed to have more fronds.

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Explorer

I see now that the climate of Funchal is a little bit warmer then from Tenerife although Tenerife is 450 km farther south! So better for coconut palms then!

Alexander

Edited by Explorer

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Explorer

Hi Cluster,

I am glad I could be of help to you with the information. I think if you could ever get any, that the pure Indian Tall variety of coconut palm from the area around Delhi, India is probably the most cold hardy variety in the world. I estimate this variety to be hardy down to 25F when it has some size and is established, since north central India I believe gets down into the upper 20'sF each winter, and they grow there. This is likely the variety that was spoken of in one of the above posts that is planted near the base of the Himalayan Mountains. The second most cold hardy variety I believe is the pure Mexican Tall variety from the Gulf Coast of Mexico. I estimate it to be cold hardy down to 26F when it is established and has some size to it. I know of two very large ones (about 45 - 50 feet tall in overall height with trunks about 25 -30 feet tall) growing in the lawn of a small motel in Brownsville, Texas in the Rio Grande Valley, about 3 hours south of me. These two palms made it through the Christmas snowstorm in Brownsville in 2004 ( the first time measurable snowfall was recorded in Brownsville in 105 years) and through at least two winters in the last 10 -15 years in which the lowest temperatures dropped down into the 27F -28F range, and yet they fully recovered and looked fine until they acquired Lethal Yellowing disease in the last few months.

Tall varieties are slightly more cold hardy than dwarfs and have a more robust growth pattern, as well as can grow in poor soils and even thrive in beach sand. Dwarf varieties on the other hand are slightly less cold hardy, but produce their first coconuts often when their trunks are only about 3 feet tall, and are more compact in their growth habits, making them more suitable for smaller yards. They are much more resistant to Lethal Yellowing than the talls, but need a more nutrient rich soil with organic matter and some fertilizer (preferably organic) to look their best. So, there are advantages to both varieties, depending on what you are looking for.

John

Never heard of coconut palms in Texas before. Those northerly coconut palms in India, the most northerly one was in Banbasa, India, just across the border of Nepal. Its almost at 29 degrees latitude north. In Northern India you see only the tall ones. Mostely is Assam wich is more shelterd from the odd coldsnaps then farther west.

Alexander

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Cluster

Funchal is not warmer than canaries, however a lot of places on the island could get closer to canaries. Madeira orography is very complex which gives it many micro-climates. The warmest spots are located in southern coast.

Funchal is like a giant amphitheater:

Funchal_Pico_da_Cruz.jpg

however the southwest coast has more insolation and huge basaltic mountains that make it a lot warmer (Ponta do Sol official weather station is 0.7 degrees warmer for example!):

madalena2011.jpg

madeira1te.jpg

2gxk3sl.jpg

s3dgex.jpg

It is just unfortunate we do not have weather stations to see how warm it actually can be (in a natural location). Something tells me one degree above Funchal is reached in some southwest locations:)

Edited by Cluster

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Cluster

Not really related to coconuts but I have always wondered what palm is this when crossing this place, it looks so nice and so tropical (copy the full link to see street view:)):

https://www.google.pt/maps/@32.6357591,-16.9412888,3a,42.7y,197.59h,86.38t/data=!3m4!1e1!3m2!1sRXV7yIjH93Nn8GHR1i9-lg!2e0?hl=en

Edited by Cluster

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nick

I can see some Phoenix canariensis, in the centre there is no palm but "Ravenala madagascariensis".

Also nice pictures above, wonder if Papaya can grow and become ripe. :greenthumb:

Edited by nick

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Cluster

Thank you for identifying it!

Yes Madeira is known to produce some Papaya and many Mangos (the mango trees are big and healthy). Also i noticed some hours ago some nearby orange palms, I spent all the night trying to identify them they look somehow similar to lipsticks but that would be very very unlikely: www.google.pt/maps/@32.6357411,-16.9415695,3a,50.6y,224.55h,82.64t/data=!3m4!1e1!3m2!1sJYjdppmbzh8bLafPeggY5w!2e0?hl=en

Edited by Cluster

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empireo22

Thank you for identifying it!

Yes Madeira is known to produce some Papaya and many Mangos (the mango trees are big and healthy). Also i noticed some hours ago some nearby orange palms, I spent all the night trying to identify them they look somehow similar to lipsticks but that would be very very unlikely: www.google.pt/maps/@32.6357411,-16.9415695,3a,50.6y,224.55h,82.64t/data=!3m4!1e1!3m2!1sJYjdppmbzh8bLafPeggY5w!2e0?hl=en

they are Dypsis lutescens.

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nick

Thank you for identifying it!

Yes Madeira is known to produce some Papaya and many Mangos (the mango trees are big and healthy). Also i noticed some hours ago some nearby orange palms, I spent all the night trying to identify them they look somehow similar to lipsticks but that would be very very unlikely: www.google.pt/maps/@32.6357411,-16.9415695,3a,50.6y,224.55h,82.64t/data=!3m4!1e1!3m2!1sJYjdppmbzh8bLafPeggY5w!2e0?hl=en

cluster, I like both very much.

Here are our mouth-watering cyprus mangos, unfortunately season is over (I asked to ID the variety, but without success. Apple mango?

post-5861-0-18947800-1412855266_thumb.jp

and papayas

post-5861-0-52749000-1412855282_thumb.jp

regarding the palms you asked, my first idea was "orange crush" but we have also "Dypsis lutescens" sometimes with too yellow leafes if in full sun.

cheers nick

Edited by nick

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Cluster

Thank you all I can rest now knowing what those orange palms are! Anyway back to the main topic, in about 3 weeks a friend of mine will send me pictures of the dwarf coconut in the port and hopefully they did not prune it or something especially the inflorescence.

Ps: People mentioned Cyrstostachys R as a possible candidate, not many people trying those in canaries. Here there are probably areas near the south/southwest coast where the low extreme temperature never falls below 50f (official station not that close to the sea), maybe with the right fungicide and proper care.

Edited by Cluster

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JEFF IN MODESTO

Ok.... Now I want to live there!

:yay:

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Stelios

Madeira is really a very beautiful place. There is a big variety of palms and tropical fruits which you can grow there. I think i saw in some photograph of a Funchal avenue some Satakentias next to a building. I also saw nice Kentias planted which I think they could successfully grow even in the full sun there since there are no extreme heatwaves. Generally is a climate which you have a big range of palms, even to try Cyrtostachys Renta.

By the way, the hills next to the sea remind me the Hawaiian islands. I was there with my wife 3 years ago and it reminds me something from Maui and Oahu. And the Big Island as well.

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Pargomad

I do not believe that they really take profit of this mild climate in Madeira. They could have a way more tropical look if they really wanted. The most popular varieties of palms there are the phoenix, the washingtonias, the syagrus, the archontophoenix, the howeas, the chamaerops and even the trachycarpus ! They could plant more coconut trees on the coast. I believe that there are just like 30 exemplars of cocos on the island, which is relatively poor compared to the Canary islands (even to el Hierro)... Species such as roystoneas, dypsis, cocos for example should be seen as a first choice.

They do the same with other trees, not only palmtrees. For example I don't understand why they keep planting olive trees or london planetrees on the coast... They could plant other tropical trees like ficus benjamina or delonix regias...

My dream is to see my motherland (Madeira ahha) full of cocos on the beaches and the coastline, where I wish I could walk under the leaves of delonix regias and roystoneas as if I were on a tropical island.

Here goes some examples of what I want Madeira to look like: (pictures from La Palma, Canary islands)

La Palma shares a lot of similarities with Madeira, the climate is quite the same ( a bit warmer though), it is quite green there (compared to lanzarote aaahah) and they have quite the same flora and fauna.

17818184.jpgIMG_3031.JPG31783539.jpg

Edited by Pargomad

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mlovecan

I am thinking about coconut palms for years, but on our island you have to be lucky to find only a few very small in flower shops.

How can I found out, what kind of variety the mother plant was respectively tall or dwarf?

Nick,

The coconut palms you describe are likely the ones produced in the Netharlands - sold all over Europe ( they come in orange pots that are about 2 litres ). They're often referred to as supermarket / Ikea coconuts - liberally mentioned here:

http://www.palmtalk.org/forum/index.php?/topic/29813-supermarket-coconut-in-the-uk/

When I visited the palmatum in Teneriffe, I was informed they could only grow these trees in Teneriffe after a long adjustment period shaded in a green house.

I once contacted the producer of those coconuts to ask the variety.

His reply was "The variety we grow is phillipine green – we import them from Costa Rica".

Cheers

Maurice

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Cluster

If one grows a supermarket coconut directly from the seed they should withstand the sun and cold better than those seedlings. If you are from Europe and do not live in these islands you should try to protect them during the winter somehow to prevent killing the plant in an extreme winter or period of days with low mean temperatures. San Diego has warmer winters than all Europe (except Canaries and Madeira) and people still get their coconuts killed there with the global warming things should be easier at least till the extreme winters kickback from time to time, but with proper care who knows?

Coconuts are my favorite palms and to answer your prayers Pargo I think we need to talk with people and inform them so they can realize the amazing looks they might be missing. I have spoken with the people from Fajã dos Padres already and suggested them to try plenty of coconuts. They already plant some very tropical fruits there why not take the next natural step and plant a coconut. Not only that but the scarab is killing all the canariensis! so there is no better time than now to start spreading the coconut love :floor: . Here are some pictures of the place (taken 2 years ago):

2s93wn5.jpg

10dclly.jpg

2q33q8k.jpg

mk7km1.jpg

ap6y2w.jpg

312enib.jpg

Edited by Cluster

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Cluster

Oh and two of these canariensis were the ones I mentioned before that died this year:( I hope they replace them with coconuts now that I had a nice chat with them:

15rxria.jpg

This is one of those places that is probably warmer 1C+ degrees than Funchal, the mangos here are ripe 1/1.5 months before Funchal and the ones that people grow at 300/400 meters()1400 feet) probably 2 months.

Edited by Cluster

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nick

I am thinking about coconut palms for years, but on our island you have to be lucky to find only a few very small in flower shops.

How can I found out, what kind of variety the mother plant was respectively tall or dwarf?

Nick,

The coconut palms you describe are likely the ones produced in the Netharlands - sold all over Europe...

His reply was "The variety we grow is phillipine green – we import them from Costa Rica".

Cheers

Maurice

Maurice, I want to avoid trying to plant a "no name" supermarket coconut because not all are in orange pots. :winkie:

Beside that, my space for experiments is limited. But thanks for your information regarding the variety.

nick

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jeevesjank

Madeira looks gorgeous. The coconut palms don't though. I'd imagine Madeira would have the same problem california has with certain tropicals.

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Cluster

Too early to say since barely no one tries them, the dwarf looks good to me though no signs of stress at all (though the next winter I will ask someone to send me photos regularly and see how it goes). Madeira does not suffer as much as California, in theory, because the winters are warmer (both highs and lows being way warmer) and has record lows above key west, but depends on location:) not every part of the island is the same.

Edited by Cluster
  • Upvote 1

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Cluster

Another thing no one ever mentions is the heat factor, one feels colder at 66 f during the night with 10 mph wind than for example 0 mph wind at 64 this is because the heat transfer is higher in the first case. Funchal and a lot of the southwest coast has minimal wind especially during the night. Hence I think there is a lot of potential, especially in the southwest coast (warmer than Funchal) but again to soon to say!

Edited by Cluster
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Pargomad

So go ahead ! PROPAGANDA for coconut trees in Madeira ! Are you sure they will plant cocos in Fajão dos padres ? It would be a great spot for them since it must be the warmest place on madeira (with paul do mar, madalena do mar and lugar de baixo).

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Cluster

I am not sure but I will talk with them next time I meet them just as a reminder:)

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Cluster

It seems I have yet another question, looking at my pictures it seems the dwarf has larger fronds than the tall ones? Aren't the talls the ones usually with larger fronds? I have noticed that sometimes the tall varieties grow so much but have small fronds, I think a tall looks better when it has a bigger crown to maintain some sort of presence (otherwise they look like a washingtonia robusta). So what happens with the talls that the frond size changes so much even specimens near each other along the beach? Another thing is that sometimes they develop fronds like a sunflowers and not umbrella style, though I predict many of those differences are due to pruning. To be honest I love both the dwarf and the tall coconut!

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Stelios

Here are some photos from our holidays:

post-9419-0-81047500-1413103778_thumb.jppost-9419-0-39158800-1413103980_thumb.jp

These are the tall at Waikiki beach

post-9419-0-17978800-1413104242_thumb.jp

Here are some dwarf and tall in Samara Beach, Costa Rica

I really prefer the dwarf because you don't have to look high in the sky to see them and you can collect the fruits more easy. Plus when you collect the fruits you can put a hammock and relax under the shade.

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Cluster

Stellios thank you for the wonderful pictures those coconuts look healthy and many of them show exactly what I was talking about, the leaves are circling! I have seen a few on canaries circling but most look more similar to the tall ones in Funchal's port.

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Stelios

Madeira can really be the Hawaii of Europe if people can plant the beaches with coconut palms. Maybe the local nurseries could bring and promote more palms especially coconut trees. If there is more availability at good prices you you see more and more people buying them for their gardens.

post-9419-0-98006500-1413457695_thumb.jp

It would be nice to have a beach like this in Madeira like in Hikkaduwa, Sri Lanka.

regards

Stelios

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Pargomad

We already have a european Hawaii in Europe : the Canary islands. Here go some examples:

10615242.jpgexterior_lancelot.jpgmaxresdefault.jpg4783.jpg

I wish Madeira was like this... The Canary islands are definitely the most beautiful islands in Europe.

  • Upvote 2

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empireo22

Pargomad, thanks for sharing. those kind of look in similar shape as the coconut in central florida (must be our cool winters) but we don't have any as tall as the ones in the last pic. maybe 20 meters?

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Cluster

Stellios Madeira is know as the Hawaii of Europe already but not due to coconuts:D, it is for their world class waves and huge dramatic green mountains that touch the sea.

2080994519_362d9690ef.jpg

one cool surf video (though the quality is not nice):

and a short promo:

However I agree that coconuts close to the black sand beaches would greatly improve the tropical vibe and look of them.

A very nice candidate for those coconuts though would be the next island from Madeira archipelago, Porto Santo (which is my favorite beach and the best I have ever been in to and also for many people that travel trough the world):

torre-praia-porto-santo-beach-23.jpg

nice promo video:P:

Edited by Cluster

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