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Cocos nucifera on Madeira Island

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Cluster

Only after you try it will you know if they can thrive there and look good on top of that. A good thing that São Miguel has over our south and southwest coast is that the rain is better distributed and even in summer it will rain a bit(Similar to our north coast), you might need to water the coco during the summer though for better results.

More pictures incoming from a hotel garden and the rest of the vacations soon:). Did you check those mature coconut fruits on Paul do Mar? Maybe I should ask the owners to send them to you guys one for each ^_^.

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Alicante

 Guys, I don't want to ruin your party out here but a coconut in the Azores is impossible to grow. It will die in the 1st winter. 

Cluster, it's already well known that lows are not very important for a climate which has constant +20ºC temperatures in the coldest month. In fact, if the average high temperature is 20ºC in the coldest month and the other part of the winter have 21-22ºC highs (or higher) it doesn't matter even if the lows are 8-9ºC. The coconut will grow very good and it will produce fruits. This is the case of Durban or Brisbane. Both are much warmer than Azores.

In fact Brisbane is warmer (highs) in May and September than any other part of the Azores during August and September, which are the warmest months as they're in the summer (remember that for Brisbane, May is like November for us, and September is like March for us) .

Coconuts grow and thrive in La Quinta, California (34ºN, northernmost coconut found if I don't remember bad) which have 7ºC lows in January but 22-23ºC highs at the same time... that's much better than 16-12 for a coconut. And a looot of sunshine which the Azores hasn't.

On 14/9/2017 2:52:35, Cluster said:

Only after you try it will you know if they can thrive there and look good on top of that. A good thing that São Miguel has over our south and southwest coast is that the rain is better distributed and even in summer it will rain a bit(Similar to our north coast), you might need to water the coco during the summer though for better results.

More pictures incoming from a hotel garden and the rest of the vacations soon:). Did you check those mature coconut fruits on Paul do Mar? Maybe I should ask the owners to send them to you guys one for each ^_^.

I explained the reasons before, there is not a problem with the lows but for the very slow warm up after the winter (it only warms up decently in June which is when the summer starts...) plus a lot of lack of sunshine in the winter, with very loiw sunshine hours, 2 months with sunshine hours under 100h and 2 other months barely surpassing 200h in the warmest Azorean climates, Santa Maria and Ponta Delgada.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Santa_Maria_Island#Climate 16.8 high in January, 16.5 in February ... 17.9 in April and 19.5 in May.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ponta_Delgada#Climate 16.8 high in January, 16.6 in February... 17.7 in April and 19.1 in May. Even less warm-up.

7 months have high averages under 19.5ºC. The winter has also very low sunshine, considerably less than Vigo or Porto, even less than Coruña, which is one of the least sunshine spots on Iberia and it's at 43ºN. Growing a coconut with those harsh conditions is impossible, not even a remote possibility for it. The lows are very ok but the sunshine hours are too low, there is also a lot of coolish winter rain out there and very important, the highs are too cool during 7 months for a coconut. If they were, let's say, 1 month with under 18ºC highs but directly the 2nd coldest was 19-20 and the 3rd coldest 20-21 maybe it can grow slow, but this is not the case of the Azores as even the warmest climates in the Azores have 5 months with high temps under 18ºC.

 

I don't want to criticize the islands, they have a great climate but it's too cool during more than half of the year (high temps) and too low sunshine in the most important months even for a long, long growing and non healthy coconut. Not even that, it would die if it's without protection from December to April. 

To put an example, it could be a small possibility if the coldest months were November, April and May, if those were December, January and February.. Instead the Azores can grow a good coolection of subtropical and some tropical palms, just as cb mentioned in the last page. A coconut just would be a poor plant dying slowly for non adequate weather. The soil can be warmer in some parts, but that's not enough. It needs sunshine which anywhere in the Azores lack during the winter. It also has lots of winter rain which is mostly coolish rain and lots of winter wind, which is also strong Altantic winds which tends more to cool than to warm.

 

Edited by Alicante

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Alicante

Pardon, this went crazy and it didn't let me edit my last post. I edited it 3 times but the changes weren't added !

I wanted to add that I ensure that I don't want to criticize the islands, they have a nice climate but in my opinion, and looking at the latest averages of the warmest Azorean places, it's definetly too cool during more than half of the year (high temps) and too low sunshine in the most important months even for a long growing and non healthy coconut. Not even that, it would die if it's without protection from December to April. 

I readed about the Gulf Stream there and I am not sure now if the winds are cool or mild. But azores have much wind on winter too.

 

Cluster, about the tropical zone, a coconut is not the best reference at all. Coconuts grow in non tropical climates such as La Quinta, Salton City, Madeira, Durban, Brisbane... and other places. Although Brisbane is the closest to be tropical, it's still not, as well as the others. And they all grow coconuts! Btw you can try to grow one from a small plant in the Azores to see how it goes, although I think that it will die fast if unprotected.

 

Returning to the topic. It would be nice if you can put some pics of those mature coconuts from Paul do Mar buddy. Or do you mention those ones:?

IMG_7768.thumb.jpg.e829aff23fe338ae086dd

 

As other users pointed on the page 13, they were still green coconuts, those 2 ones from this pic (not mature) 

do you have updates about them, if they remained green or turned yellow? when they're yellow they're almost mature and when they're orange they're mature! here is an example: https://shirlandyou.files.wordpress.com/2014/08/coconut_beverage-1.jpg

Edited by Alicante

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Cluster

Hello Adam,

That tropical climate definition is my own definition not the official, let me explain why. There are cool tropical places (64f+/17.8c+) where many coconuts die from time to time due to extreme cold events somewhere around Jupiter, Fl is that not more dubious? If you can reliably grow a coconut (long term), then you can easily grow many of the most known tropicals too, I think it is a good compromise and the symbol of the tropics is the coconut palm.

The coconut from La Quinta is indeed an impressive feat, but it is in a special spot where the trunk is touching a wall and surrounded by a pool and plumerias, more importantly it is still not what I would call a long term. That particular home is also at a good elevation to avoid as much radiational freeze. Regardless, with the notorious heat island effect that all coachella valley has experienced during the last years that spot in particular might be tropical proof, indeed, time will tell. There is a weather station at 300 m elevation in Palm Desert (so it should be similar due to the elevation etc) where in 1979 the average January mean low was 6.3 and 14.5 max, usually it would average 10.6 to 20.9 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Palm_Desert,_California#cite_note-10. Unfortunately there is no info regarding the lowest temperature in that January event, but it is safe to say a coconut would have died anyway as Lisbon is warmer both in lows and highs than that. 

The coconuts from Paul do Mar are in theory viable for sprouting already, last week I was there and they looked mostly brown to my eye, they were already developing a brown patch when I was there before 4 weeks ago, they are very big, the pictures don't make them justice:

4 weeks ago picture with camera:

jy5PuCm.jpg

aXqPbMF.jpg

 

Last week (Unfortunately I had no camera with me so used my smartphone and I am leaving the island soon):

oYOwHPA.jpg

:)

 

As for the Azores, yes we know their highs are a bit low, but maybe someone will manage it, their lows are also very manageable and stable, that should certainly help them. So give them a special spot (notice I talk about a spot and not zone here, like La Quinta coconut) and perhaps the coco will survive. I am not saying it will work, but they should try it anyway even if just for science.

regards,

Pedro

 

 

 

 

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Stelios

Great coconuts from Madeira. I hope people will start to give them a chance to grow more normal without to over trimm them.

As for Azores, I would try a coconut just for the experiment if I was there. Don't just keep looking at some numbers from some wheather station. There is always the possibility that your yard could have a better microclimate than some numbers show. Comparing some websites I see that Azores have higher lows and simillar highs like we have here in Cyprus in the winter. My yard has better microclimate than the stations show and so far my coconut gets only some protection and without heating cables. In Azores plant it in mostly sand, keep it as dry as possible in the winter and away from any cool wind. Protect it as much as possible when its small.

Creating a microclimate could make a difference. And it could be fun to try this experiment!

Edited by Stelios
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Alicante

Yes Cluster, those 2 cocos look pretty m

ature already. ;) nice pics!

Stelios, Cyprus has much warmer spring warm-up. Much, much warmer specially from April to June, just as southern Spain has.

There is an user from the biggest Spanish gardening forum which has 3 coconuts in Málaga for the 4th year in a row, they look great and the biggest has an almost 2m trunk, did I post the pics? If not, i'll do a thread soon and post one pic here.

 

They didn't receive any kind of winter protection and they're placed looking south, shielded from cold winds for the wall of the house nearby. 

But Málaga, and probably Cyprus too (I don't know well about your climate, Stelios, as the only Limassol averages are 1991-2005 and not 1981-2010), have without any problem some days with +24°C highs during winter and many above 20°C. The warmest Azorean place didn't surpass 20.4 and 20.6 in their history in January and February! That's why I am so skeptic, they require warmer winter highs and specially much warmer springs. The Málaga coconuts will die in a cooler year, I am completely sure too.

 

Even for the exceptional warmest place on the whole island of Azores still the highs are too mild or cool (however you want to call it) and the islands are so mild that until May you won't see a decent warmup.

April barely averages 0.9°C more (high) than Ponta Delgada in January! However to get out of doubt I also recommend planting one. Btw, regards. ;)

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Xenon
On 9/18/2017, 8:13:51, Cluster said:

Hello Adam,

That tropical climate definition is my own definition not the official, let me explain why. There are cool tropical places (64f+/17.8c+) where many coconuts die from time to time due to extreme cold events somewhere around Jupiter, Fl is that not more dubious? If you can reliably grow a coconut (long term), then you can easily grow many of the most known tropicals too, I think it is a good compromise and the symbol of the tropics is the coconut palm.

The coconut from La Quinta is indeed an impressive feat, but it is in a special spot where the trunk is touching a wall and surrounded by a pool and plumerias, more importantly it is still not what I would call a long term. That particular home is also at a good elevation to avoid as much radiational freeze. Regardless, with the notorious heat island effect that all coachella valley has experienced during the last years that spot in particular might be tropical proof, indeed, time will tell. There is a weather station at 300 m elevation in Palm Desert (so it should be similar due to the elevation etc) where in 1979 the average January mean low was 6.3 and 14.5 max, usually it would average 10.6 to 20.9 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Palm_Desert,_California#cite_note-10. Unfortunately there is no info regarding the lowest temperature in that January event, but it is safe to say a coconut would have died anyway as Lisbon is warmer both in lows and highs than that. 

I don't think you give enough credit to heat accumulation and winter high temperatures. There are definitely some warm spots in the Coachella Valley or else mangoes would not be grown there commercially. To be honest, I think the coconuts in central Florida and south Texas at their best look better than the coconuts in Madeira. It's a combination of low latitude, winter highs 21-22*C, very quick warm-up (mean temperatures ~19-21*C by March), and an extremely long period of tropical warmth. 

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Cluster

Hello,

To be fair I said it was impressive and even said maybe some micro climates might have warmed up too be coconut proof. All the stations that I know of that have been there for a while record temperatures that would kill any coconut hence why I am not sure either way(if they can survive longterm in a zone), plus few people here on palmtalk have tried to plant one in the valley and were unsuccessful. Like I said with the increased temperature of the valley over the years such feat might be achievable and you might see 20+ years coconut planted on the Streets or maybe it won't work.

I agree with you, I have seen many central Florida coconuts that look very good, better than Madeira ones. In a normal year you will have warmer everything there compared to Madeira plus they have rain all year we have 3 and a half months with nothing in the south coast:). However the cocos here are all trimmed, half of them grow without space and most don't get the proper water to counter our dry weather, especially in the summer. That sums up my report over the last 3 years. There has been one or 2 situations where I have seen proper cared coconut with not so much trimming and they looked great. We have 25 or so coconuts on the island but I think I and you have not seen the best they can look on the island yet:). Today I went to the marina and they did not cut the dwarf one since my last report, beginning of August and it is looking way better.

Regards,

Pedro

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Cluster

Hello guys here are some pictures from the garden in the hotel Regency Palace which went offline for 1 year or so. Now it is called Pestana Royal. I had shown pictures before of the coconut there, fortunately it is still there, not sure they kept irrigation or not.

But first general garden pictures:

9YCGjL6.jpg

OWFsIwA.jpg

djr9mIT.jpg

DDIsLLC.jpg

nguj0vg.jpg

kYHXhee.jpg

ewEHjht.jpg

rukywJ8.jpg

8Rf6j9s.jpg

 

Feel free to comment as I do not know some of those palms:).

Coco coming later.

 

Edited by Cluster
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Pargomad

Cool pictures ! I think this is one of the most tropical gardens of the entire island with some species you can easily find on tropical islands like the Roystoneas, dypsis lutescens, butia capitata, what I believe to be some ptychosperma elegans, ravenala madagascariensis, caryota urens, pandanus utilis and even some adonidia merrillii !!

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Cluster

Thanks for the input Kevin! These last pictures from Madeira were all taken 3 weeks ago by the way, I am back in Lisbon.

Now for the coco:

svzKWUd.jpg

9FvDKDx.jpg

obOJmXj.jpg

mKVs4NS.jpg

 

I know in this case that the coconut and the palms came from Florida many years ago when the hotel was being constructed. If one looks at the coconut trunk it seems it started to get fatter after a certain height, I wonder if this is when they transplanted it here and fed it better. It appears they removed the tree that was in front of the coconut and is nice to know it did well during the transition from one hotel brand to this new. It is being massively trimmed though, even more than in the past.

 

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Alicante
7 hours ago, Pargomad said:

Cool pictures ! I think this is one of the most tropical gardens of the entire island with some species you can easily find on tropical islands like the Roystoneas, dypsis lutescens, butia capitata, what I believe to be some ptychosperma elegans, ravenala madagascariensis, caryota urens, pandanus utilis and even some adonidia merrillii !!

Those species are normal for Madeira, Pargomad! I'm sure that Madeira has more semi-tropical gardens with fully tropical species. ;)

All of those species are normal even in gardens from southern Spain, you can find them in southern Spain too. :) (Málaga, Cádiz, the coast of Granada such as Motril, Nerja, Almuñecar,..) Ravenala Madagascariensis is harder to find, but the other species can be found in many places. The Butia is very hardy, it can be found in central-western France too (Altantic coast).

 

Cluster, that coconut looks really nice and cared! I'm sure that in winter the concrete from the building from behind maintains it warmer when the sun shines. It's also very well irrigated!. I like it. :greenthumb: The garden also looks very nice and cared of!

Edited by Alicante
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Cluster

Hello Adam,

Thanks!

It would look much better without the big trimming though. The coco is around 5 meters/16ft (give or take) from the side building and 20 meters/66ft from the back building. I personally think it looked better in the winter around 2 years ago which was the last time I took a picture of the coconut, it should be around somewhere in this thread:D. 

A few more pictures I took during this summer, with my smartphone and camera:

e2KQO0D.jpg

3MPxk7W.jpg

0Y9gl2A.jpg

UbRF4q0.jpg

nLlb7lB.jpg

NfFGzfz.jpg

kupIwgl.jpg

Too bad the picture above does not have a coconut instead:D

d5MTzFK.jpg

knihDM9.jpg

 

0xrHZNP.jpg

fWTF5XQ.jpg

HNLL0mT.jpg

 

Tomorrow I update the Marina coconuts with pictures which I took just before returning (Spoiler alert the Dwarf still looks the best to me:) ).

 

Edited by Cluster
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Alicante

Madeira is soooooo similar to La Palma island !!! OMG they even look from the same archipielago.

 

Oh wait, they are. :P

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Cluster
On 10/2/2017, 10:08:47, Alicante said:

Madeira is soooooo similar to La Palma island !!! OMG they even look from the same archipielago.

 

Oh wait, they are. :P

Haha :)

And now for the Marina coconuts update, all pictures taken 19th September, it was a windy afternoon.

Starting from west to east with the biggest coconut in the Marina:

CG4dIyP.jpg

UhgVffj.jpg

 

Next we have the smallest:

5FfnZQx.jpg

 

Following row has a lonely coconut:

U75NkJh.jpg

 

Last row first, second and third coconut:

ln7YJp6.jpg

q8DOlnl.jpg

LgfNeII.jpg

You can see more developed coconuts (left) and less developed (right) on this one if you zoom in

 

And now to the Dwarf which for me is one of the best looking coconuts on the island:

lckikgQ.jpg

Since August they have left her alone, which is nice as you can already notice a much rounder crown! In fact the lowest leaf was almost touching the ground, first time I see it (and I am sure it will not be there when I return:( ).

 

Another view:

usDUpNc.jpg

She would look much better if they left it as well as the other coconuts. Some of the other coconuts do not seem to like the constrained space there, maybe some fertilizer and proper irrigation could change that. I wonder if they could be transplanted still?

Another thing I have noticed is that the Dwarf has some nice tint to its leaves, they are lighter colored than the other coconuts.

I have spoken with some people on public gardens that were taking care of them and asked if they could talk with the responsibles for the coconuts and see if they can treat them better. I have also spoken with people in the Marina with the same purpose. 

Anyway it was nice to see how much the Dwarf improved in one month without trimming, with the way she is looking I am sure it could do as good or better (due to self pollination) than the Paul do Mar coconuts if they would let her.

 

Edited by Cluster
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Mr. Coconut Palm

Pedro,

They are looking pretty good, especially the Green Malayan Dwarf.  I love all the photos you post of your island.  What a beautiful place.  It must be paradise, and the water there is so clear and blue!

John

P.S.  Hopefully, people will listen to you and STOP trimming the coconut palms there and let the nuts fully develop.

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palmfriend
On 10/2/2017, 8:48:00, Cluster said:

Hello Adam,

Thanks!

It would look much better without the big trimming though. The coco is around 5 meters/16ft (give or take) from the side building and 20 meters/66ft from the back building. I personally think it looked better in the winter around 2 years ago which was the last time I took a picture of the coconut, it should be around somewhere in this thread:D. 

A few more pictures I took during this summer, with my smartphone and camera:

e2KQO0D.jpg

.

.

.

HNLL0mT.jpg

 

Tomorrow I update the Marina coconuts with pictures which I took just before returning (Spoiler alert the Dwarf still looks the best to me:) ).

 

That was a wonderful tour with beautiful pictures! The island`s nature looks impressive with a lot potential to grow many species -

thank you very much,

best regards

Lars

 

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Cluster
On 10/4/2017, 4:23:11, Mr. Coconut Palm said:

Pedro,

They are looking pretty good, especially the Green Malayan Dwarf.  I love all the photos you post of your island.  What a beautiful place.  It must be paradise, and the water there is so clear and blue!

John

P.S.  Hopefully, people will listen to you and STOP trimming the coconut palms there and let the nuts fully develop.

 

On 10/4/2017, 3:08:10, palmfriend said:

That was a wonderful tour with beautiful pictures! The island`s nature looks impressive with a lot potential to grow many species -

thank you very much,

best regards

Lars

 

Thank you John and Lars! I am constantly trying to to educate people on coconuts maybe they will eventually learn!

 

Here is my last update, on a coconut I have not shown for 2 years here, this is how she looked like in summer 2k15:

 

242cumu.jpg

 

2yxgnch.jpg

 

And now in September 2k17 in daylight!:

mA0iBZu.jpg

 

bANEKEJ.jpg

X8FdPUr.jpg

9K5SRS0.jpg

 

F1yoUYT.jpg

wwA0ADK.jpg

 

Yes it is trimmed, but it looks very very healthy with long and strong leaves! Just concerned that at some point it won't have enough space to properly develop:(

 

Hope you guys enjoy it:)

Edited by Cluster
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Mr. Coconut Palm

Hey Pedro,

That last one you posted photos of looks like a Green Malayan Dwarf that is just starting to trunk.  Again, if they would quit trimming it, it would look much better.  I have never understood why anyone would think that a trimmed palm, especially an over trimmed palm looks good.  Palms ALWAYS look so much better with a complete round crown of leaves.

John

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palmfriend

Pedro,

that is indeed a beauty!

I would say that the actual trimming is a bit too much and I hope they will stop it when the palm

gets taller and the lower leaves are out reach for the pool guests or people just walking by. 

Time will tell.

Thank you very much for posting.

best regards

Lars 

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Paranormal

.

Edited by Paranormal

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Paranormal

.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by Paranormal

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Paranormal

Excuse me. it was wrong.

Edited by Paranormal

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Paranormal

[ Sea - Mediterranean; vicinity of ]

Europe, Asia, Africa; Average conditions:

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SоІеmіо

 

 

 

8.PNG.1d86f0cd024c907e0a09a172e697e3c3.PNG

The hottest beach in the Mediterranean region; but coconut will die even here, the average conditions are below 72℉.

Edited by SоІеmіо
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Paranormal
14 minutes ago, SоІеmіо said:

 

If a 20-year-old coconut is carried, perhaps it can be cold-resistant?

Astounding-Pictures-Of-Coconut-Trees-69-In-Best-Interior-with-Pictures-Of-Coconut-Trees.jpg.8eb2df363aa8809056b82863e77e8033.jpg

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SоІеmіо
6 minutes ago, Paranormal said:

If a 20-year-old coconut is carried, perhaps it can be cold-resistant?

Astounding-Pictures-Of-Coconut-Trees-69-In-Best-Interior-with-Pictures-Of-Coconut-Trees.jpg.8eb2df363aa8809056b82863e77e8033.jpg

At the age of 20 there is little difference, the rainy winters wet the roots and become fungi; even if it's a 40-year-old coconut, nothing will change, the risk will continue...
Also, for the meristem these weather conditions are not appropriate.

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Stelios

We just came for holidays with my family here in Madeira. I took these photos yesterday. The cocos at the marina look really good Pedro considering the general abuse. The dwarf coco had 1 small coconut on it. 

What a fantastic place is Madeira. Still a lot to explore. So far the gardens of Monte is one of the most impressive garden we visited. And many nice palms grow here on the island.

2017-12-28 07.56.22.jpg

2017-12-28 07.55.43.jpg

2017-12-28 07.53.00.jpg

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Anamurlu

Rainy cold months, it will be very tiring. It is very obvious that they are not native. even in their homeland difficult plants and their lives will be short. I wonder what the 'record age' level will be...

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Cluster

Hello Stelios, thanks for the update! I hope you enjoy your stay there:) Be sure to do Caldeirão Verde walk (if the weather allows it) and with a car go from Porto Moniz till Paul da Serra and then Encumeada, if the clouds are below Paul da Serra you are in for a treat road trip.

I had to go to Madeira mid October and took some pictures of the cocos (which I have not yet updated here), they were less trimmed in October and thus looked slightly better, the dwarf one for example had a leaf that was 90 degrees down and still green, showing that if you allow it, they can keep their fronds straight down:)

Take a look:

CY7qsz1.jpg

yqzH4mY.jpg

Af4ncER.jpg

yRhMNDM.jpg

DjFp0iR.jpg

 

J1FKjlv.jpg

r5bA16E.jpg

https://i.imgur.com/poVwh1h.jpgpoVwh1h.jpg

 

This last one is the tallest and oldest one:) Keep us up to date! And PM me if you need tips!

 

 

 

 

 

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Stelios

Hi Pedro! Thanks for the info. I'll send you PM if I need some advise. We just came back from Santana. We went there by bus on the way to Frio Ribeiro. What a paradise island! It reminds a bit of Road to Hana in Maui and Costa Rica. The nature is just stunning.

I think they should try more coconuts in Madeira, even though I saw kentias and archontophoenix look like they are on steroids. I saw some chambeyronias among other palms. A couple of them with red new leaf. Very tropical pictures and green all around!

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Cluster
13 hours ago, Anamurlu said:

Rainy cold months, it will be very tiring. It is very obvious that they are not native. even in their homeland difficult plants and their lives will be short. I wonder what the 'record age' level will be...

I think the dwarf one looks great (just see my pictures before when they were less trimmed in October). Coconuts there do not have enough water and are all trimmed, they would look a bit better otherwise, in fact coconuts often look better there in the winter (due to the rain). In terms of longevity the oldest and tallest one (the last one from my picture) is around 30 years old or so people told me in the Marina. I know of another one around 25 years at 170 m elevation (558 ft) which is not optimal at all. To be honest I consider them hardy on the island, the climate is very solid, plenty of zone 12 zones. 

Edited by Cluster

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Stelios

Hi Pedro

Just an update from 2 of the coconuts in Madalena do Mar. The other 2 under the trees I missed them. The weather was not very good and it started to rain so I was trying to concentrate on driving. At home we drive like in the UK and I was just getting used to the roads. We only have the car 2 more days and we want to explore other parts of the island so I think we will not pass again from there. Next time.

Near these cocos I saw some nice coconut looking Ravenea rivularis but they were a bit over trimmed.

2018-01-05 19.43.01.jpg

2018-01-05 19.42.37.jpg

2018-01-05 19.43.52.jpg

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Cluster

Thanks for the up to date picture, the reason why you missed the others is because you probably took the "fast road" from Ponta do Sol to Madalena that goes through a modern tunnel instead of the old road near the sea (which does have very short old but epic tunnels). If you ever go back to Madalena I advise you to go by the sea road till Ponta do Sol, since the views are awesome and you can car wash below a waterfall and a hidden paradisiac beach just after the first old tunnel (first one considering Madalena to Ponta do Sol) way:). 

You are having bad luck now as the island is facing an orange alert due to stormy weather so not normal conditions! 

Regardless I hope you enjoy it and thanks again!

PS: IPMA forecast for the next days:

BIc4zyf.png

 

Edited by Cluster
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Pargomad

Nice photos Stelios ! I hope to see more updates soon ! 

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Stelios

Thanks! I can't wait to see updates as well. Especially from the palms I missed when I was there.

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Cluster

Hello everyone,

I was on the island on the last weekend and took some quick photos as I was showing the island to some friends! While Madeira is not known to have much wind in the north coast or south coast (except southeast where it is very windy), this year we are being hammered by strong gale winds, first before the end of the year and now once again while I was there and is still ongoing due to a tropical storm. Late February and March have been way more rainy than usual and the temperatures have also been below with less sunshine.

In any case here are some quick Marina shots, this time not only do we have some trimming (especially regarding the green Malayan we also have some broken fronds due to the gale winds), it is possible they are worse now as I was not there when the winds got the strongest.

Beginning from west to east:

Tallest coco with smallest coco of the marina:

0jE1Pvu.jpg

 

 

Next we see another coco with the smallest coco and the biggest in the background to the right (which has a decent crown  in my opinion)

x1p1ezs.jpg

 

Next group:

M5jO4jy.jpg

 

MjtHo2v.jpg

 

Dwarf coconut (fully trimmed:( ):

 

GFPgoNR.jpg

 

Overall I think they are doing well in the coldest month with lots of rain and wind, a shame they keep trimming the coconuts, but it seems to me they are having more issues trimming the biggest one which is paying off:)

I might share more pictures this week, have a nice weekend!

 

Edited by Cluster
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Pargomad

Hey Cluster !

I want to thank you for posting your photos here and for reminding us how beautiful this island is. I hope in the future we'll see the streets plenty of not trimmed and well watered coconut palms ! God, I miss this island so bad.

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Cluster

Thank you Kevin,

Whenever I can I will update the thread and my findings!

Here are some new updates!

The highest elevation coconut I know off on the island 200+ m (656+ ft) in this horrible winter (by the way the last time I shared a picture of this one is on page 12):

DVcjbM5.jpg

8nrjuYJ.jpg

Trimmed but healthy growing in the open, it faces east, some wind beating from the several storms we have been having.

 

Madalena do Mar "wild coconuts" that Stelios did not see:D :

jz1AVEM.jpg

4JMZmb7.jpg

6YJh8Cq.jpg

I have never seen with detail where they are really rooted, they are in a pebble beach, but there is a lot of sand after you get to the water, most likely below the pebbles there is black sand. Regardless the soil is very well drained, too well drained for coconuts that won't get any water during 3 and a half months during summer. Last summer and beyond has been very dry overall, but now at the end of February and March it is raining like hell. These coconuts would look great with some added water I believe. They sit on one of the warmest if not the warmest place I know of.

Bonus pictures of my weekend showing the island:

qpjnaSc.jpg

PufXjZh.jpg

LQbMo2w.jpg

L691S0C.jpg

 

7H7AHp2.jpg

qlSB3C4.jpg

 

With all that, I did not rest at all and came back to Lisbon exhausted:D 

Have a nice day everyone:)

 

 

 

 

Edited by Cluster
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Stelios

Great photos Pedro! Too bad I missed the palms on the beach at Madalena do Mar. We will be back to Madeira so I will see in the future how they will grow.

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