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Newport Beach coconut pics

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LJG

I've seen a lot of near death palms be brought back to their former glory and it's wonderful to see the "rescue" result in a happy palm. Some were very marginal for the area palms too. I've done the same for a few of my client's palms where certified "arborists" had actually been doing much more harm than good.

I say don't let nature take its course since, if that were our motto in drought stricken CA, we'd have thousands of dying palms, not just this Cocos crying out for help.

Big difference between saving a palm dying from lack of water and one dying from fungus. This is clearly a rot issue - perhaps brought on by lack of water. Look at the 'neck-down' of the crown and look at the last green frond going brown with the tell tale sign of fungus.

But hey, if someone wants to put their time into throwing water down they should also hit it with a systematic fungicide and copper.

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Jim in Los Altos

I've seen a lot of near death palms be brought back to their former glory and it's wonderful to see the "rescue" result in a happy palm. Some were very marginal for the area palms too. I've done the same for a few of my client's palms where certified "arborists" had actually been doing much more harm than good.

I say don't let nature take its course since, if that were our motto in drought stricken CA, we'd have thousands of dying palms, not just this Cocos crying out for help.

Big difference between saving a palm dying from lack of water and one dying from fungus. This is clearly a rot issue - perhaps brought on by lack of water. Look at the 'neck-down' of the crown and look at the last green frond going brown with the tell tale sign of fungus.

But hey, if someone wants to put their time into throwing water down they should also hit it with a systematic fungicide and copper.

Agree! Water and fungicide. A lot of us in CA are used to fungicide after winter's wrath and we're all used to having to irrigate 3/4 of the year too.

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LJG

I've seen a lot of near death palms be brought back to their former glory and it's wonderful to see the "rescue" result in a happy palm. Some were very marginal for the area palms too. I've done the same for a few of my client's palms where certified "arborists" had actually been doing much more harm than good.

I say don't let nature take its course since, if that were our motto in drought stricken CA, we'd have thousands of dying palms, not just this Cocos crying out for help.

Big difference between saving a palm dying from lack of water and one dying from fungus. This is clearly a rot issue - perhaps brought on by lack of water. Look at the 'neck-down' of the crown and look at the last green frond going brown with the tell tale sign of fungus.

But hey, if someone wants to put their time into throwing water down they should also hit it with a systematic fungicide and copper.

Agree! Water and fungicide. A lot of us in CA are used to fungicide after winter's wrath and we're all used to having to irrigate 3/4 of the year too.

Jim, you are always so optimistic :)

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Jim in Los Altos

I've seen a lot of near death palms be brought back to their former glory and it's wonderful to see the "rescue" result in a happy palm. Some were very marginal for the area palms too. I've done the same for a few of my client's palms where certified "arborists" had actually been doing much more harm than good.

I say don't let nature take its course since, if that were our motto in drought stricken CA, we'd have thousands of dying palms, not just this Cocos crying out for help.

Big difference between saving a palm dying from lack of water and one dying from fungus. This is clearly a rot issue - perhaps brought on by lack of water. Look at the 'neck-down' of the crown and look at the last green frond going brown with the tell tale sign of fungus.

But hey, if someone wants to put their time into throwing water down they should also hit it with a systematic fungicide and copper.

Agree! Water and fungicide. A lot of us in CA are used to fungicide after winter's wrath and we're all used to having to irrigate 3/4 of the year too.

Jim, you are always so optimistic :)

Hey Len, You're talking to the guy growing Marojejya darianii, Wodyetia, Roystonea, Gaussia, Pinanga, etc., etc., etc. way up here in Nor Cal. I'm often blamed of being WAY too optimistic.

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LJG

I've seen a lot of near death palms be brought back to their former glory and it's wonderful to see the "rescue" result in a happy palm. Some were very marginal for the area palms too. I've done the same for a few of my client's palms where certified "arborists" had actually been doing much more harm than good.

I say don't let nature take its course since, if that were our motto in drought stricken CA, we'd have thousands of dying palms, not just this Cocos crying out for help.

Big difference between saving a palm dying from lack of water and one dying from fungus. This is clearly a rot issue - perhaps brought on by lack of water. Look at the 'neck-down' of the crown and look at the last green frond going brown with the tell tale sign of fungus.

But hey, if someone wants to put their time into throwing water down they should also hit it with a systematic fungicide and copper.

Agree! Water and fungicide. A lot of us in CA are used to fungicide after winter's wrath and we're all used to having to irrigate 3/4 of the year too.

Jim, you are always so optimistic :)

Hey Len, You're talking to the guy growing Marojejya darianii, Wodyetia, Roystonea, Gaussia, Pinanga, etc., etc., etc. way up here in Nor Cal. I'm often blamed of being WAY too optimistic.

I know. That was part of my point. Good on ya. :)

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Brahea Axel

make it down there tomorrow and will try and go twice a week with 15 gal. each.

Like trying to rescue a sea lion that's been bitten by a Great White...let nature take her course.

Well, Gonzer, you don't get a T-shirt then.

If this coconut survives, I will buy Matthew a T-shirt, it's already designed.

ScreenShot2014-07-02at120339PM_zpsee96e0

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Gonzer

make it down there tomorrow and will try and go twice a week with 15 gal. each.

Like trying to rescue a sea lion that's been bitten by a Great White...let nature take her course.

Well, Gonzer, you don't get a T-shirt then.

If this coconut survives, I will buy Matthew a T-shirt, it's already designed.

ScreenShot2014-07-02at120339PM_zpsee96e0

That's alright Axel, I don't wear T's anyway. But I will say there sure does seem to be a plethora of Mother Theresa's on board here.

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Matt in OC

make it down there tomorrow and will try and go twice a week with 15 gal. each.

Like trying to rescue a sea lion that's been bitten by a Great White...let nature take her course.

Well, Gonzer, you don't get a T-shirt then.

If this coconut survives, I will buy Matthew a T-shirt, it's already designed.

ScreenShot2014-07-02at120339PM_zpsee96e0

Love it! :greenthumb:

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Tyrone

I've seen a lot of near death palms be brought back to their former glory and it's wonderful to see the "rescue" result in a happy palm. Some were very marginal for the area palms too. I've done the same for a few of my client's palms where certified "arborists" had actually been doing much more harm than good.

I say don't let nature take its course since, if that were our motto in drought stricken CA, we'd have thousands of dying palms, not just this Cocos crying out for help.

Yeah. If I lived in the area I'd give it some help along. It wouldn't take much time. If it survived to recover to former glory then what an achievement for such a famous coconut.

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Matt in OC

I thought I might as well post an update for those interested.

I've been once a week for the past three weeks, taking it what water I can transport (5-6 gal.) as well as some slow release palm fertilizer. I also hit it with some fungicide in the crown my first time there. Today I finally got my water bag situation sorted out and I left it with a 15 gal. bag slow-draining that will hopefully be there next time I stop by.

For whatever reason, I didn't take pictures the first visit but here are some from July 11th:

post-9980-0-52211700-1405715250_thumb.jp

post-9980-0-86497900-1405715258_thumb.jp

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Matt in OC

And today:

post-9980-0-76515400-1405715502_thumb.jp

post-9980-0-08741500-1405715505_thumb.jp

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_Keith

That's promising. If it could just get a little more energy going before winter comes back!!!!

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DoomsDave

Ah, Friar, best on ya for trying.

We'll have to give you a St. Jude . . .

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MKIVRYAN

That's awesome that someone is willing to try and help that palm! Thanks!

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Walter John

well done, does my recent photo bringing it back to attention earn me a right to wear the t shirt ?

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_Keith

well done, does my recent photo bringing it back to attention earn me a right to wear the t shirt ?

Only if you gave it a dose of yellow fertilizer while you were there.

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Hammer

Virtual high five! Thanks for your effort in keeping a legend alive!!!

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Tyrone

scionfriar, You're a champion. :)

Well done. Let's hope it pulls through.

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Mr. Coconut Palm

Hello All My Fellow Coconut Palm Lovers,

I agree with what others have said on this post. As a grower of coconut palms in a marginal climate (Corpus Christi, Texas), I am kind of becoming an expert in helping them to grow where they otherwise might not, and to recover from conditions that might otherwise do them in . I think that it is a combination of things. First the usually chilly damp winters take their toll on the palm each winter, but it can survive and even recover from normal winters there as it has proven for many years. Therefore, using a copper based fungicide, such as Bonide (approved for organic horticulture) would be good. Apply it thoroughly to the crown and upper part of the trunk just under the crown 3 times over the next 6 weeks, about two weeks apart for each application. If you use Bonide, mix one ounce of fungicide with a gallon of water, and after mixing thoroughly, apply with a sprayer thoroughly wetting the leaves and especially the central part of the crown.

Secondly, I think it is lacking a good fertilizer. I recommend an ALL ORGANIC slow release with all the essential micronutrients (these should include Boron, and essential micro for palms to recover from cold damage). I use MicroLife 6-2-4, with 70 micronutrients that is specifically formulated for the Texas Gulf Coast, but I am sure would be good for this nutrient deficient palm. I have just recently started using MicroLife 8-4-6 Ultimate with the same 70 micros. I have had excellent results with this. It is produced by San Jacinto Environmental in Houston, and I could send some to one of you S. Cal. residents that is serious about rescuing this palm, if you could help me with shipping since finances are a little tight for me right now. I also use Medina Hasta Gro 12-4-8 Lawn, which has some of the essential micros, as a foliar spray. Again, I mix one ounce with a gallon of water, then apply with a sprayer, thoroughly wetting the crown. I apply it every few weeks during the warmer growing months.

Lastly, I think like others have said that this poor palm is not getting nearly enough water during the very dry California summers. From about early May until about mid September, this palm should be getting a good deep watering once a week, and no supplemental watering during the cool damp winters, unless there is a long stretch of warm dry weather in the winter. More coconut palms are lost in marginal climates due to overwatering in cool damp winters than to the occasional freeze. Also, I would suggest adding about an inch of a good organic compost to the entire root zone around the base of the palm, and then applying a good organic mulch to about two inches thick, starting about 3 - 4 inches away from the trunk. This will help retain soil moisture during the dry months, and the organic matter as it breaks down will increase the soil temperatures by possibly a couple of degrees, which is a major benefit for those of us trying to grow coconut palms in marginal cool winter climates. Good luck and keep us posted, and let me know if you want me to send any fertilizer.

John

mr.coconutpalm@yahoo.com

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Mr. Coconut Palm

In the fall and early spring a good deep watering about once every two and a half to three weeks would be good, and during the winter ONLY watering about once every six weeks or so when it hasn't been raining. Only water in the winter on a warm day, never on a cool day.

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Hammer

In the fall and early spring a good deep watering about once every two and a half to three weeks would be good, and during the winter ONLY watering about once every six weeks or so when it hasn't been raining. Only water in the winter on a warm day, never on a cool day.

John, this is some excellent insight. I plan to apply some of this advice in growing my own coconut here in Southern Cal.

I'm curious what your winters are generally like in comparison to those here in SoCal.

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Mr. Coconut Palm

Hey Hammer,

Our winters here are slightly milder than yours are which makes our marginal coconut climate slightly more acceptable for coconuts than S. Cal. Our normal high in January at the airport (about 20 miles inland from the Gulf of Mexico) is 66F or 67F, with a normal low of about 46F to 47F. Here where I live on the east side of town near the water, I estimate our normal high to be 65F and normal low 50F or 51F. This gives us a average soil temp in Jan. of about 57.5F to 58F, and with the increased organic matter in the soil, and therefore increased microbial activity in the soil, my normal soil temp should be about 59F to 59.5F, right at the magical number of 60F for healthy coconut palm growth.

We also have many sunny dry days, but some cloudy damp and chilly days in the winter (but not as many damp chilly days as you guys have out there in S. Cal.) We also have a generous number of days in the mid to upper 70's periodically throughout the winter with a few days around the low 80's. Also, in late February we start to come out of winter rapidly and soon have consistent highs in the 70's and 80's. In the summer too, we have the added benefit of warmth and humidity, which coconut palms love, so ours are able to recover relatively quickly (by early to mid summer) from any ill effects of the cool winters. Our normal high at the airport in July is 94F, with a normal low of 75F, and where I live the normal high in July is about 93F with a normal low of about 79F, and our wettest months are September and October, when we average about 5 and 4 inches respectively, with May or June being our third wettest month. In September, we are still in the low 90's and upper 80's, and in October in the low to mid 80's. So we get our most rainfall when we are warm in late summer and early fall, which is quite suitable for coconut palms.

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Tyrone

My coconut in Perth is planted in a mound with river pebbles all around it to absorb winter sun and heat. I then put an "Elizabethan collar" made out of thick clear plastic around the trunk at ground level to deflect any winter rain off it. The palm is planted in straight sand. In the warm weather it is watered well and fertilised well. I planted it in Nov 2007 and so far so good. These things hate winter rain and cold wet feet. The leaves are hardier than a bottle palm though.

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Gtlevine

That palm is already DEAD! It is on the Green Mile and just waiting for the chair. All the water and Fungicide in the world won't help that beast come back to life. If you want to do that palm a favor and save us So Cal's from any more palm embarassment, show up with a chain saw and a chipper.

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pogobob

Besides the rollercoaster ride of summer recovery and winter setbacks, the planting of a large washingtonia within a few feet a couple of years ago sealed it's demise.

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chris78

as the growing bud gets feather from that heat reflecting wall..... each winter will prove harder for this coconut to survive and one winter it wont survive :badday:

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Brahea Axel

Besides the rollercoaster ride of summer recovery and winter setbacks, the planting of a large washingtonia within a few feet a couple of years ago sealed it's demise.

That's a good point, that coconut is getting water starved by that Washingtonia.

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Perito

Chainsaw run at Midnight!

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Mr. Coconut Palm

I think there are some palm haters here masquerading as palm lovers. I think this famous palm is worth saving. Let's save it!

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Brahea Axel

If you want to save that palm, then bring a chainsaw and mulcher for the washingtonia. Pogobob is right, without getting rid of the washingtonia, that coconut doesn't stand a chance.

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Matt in OC

Yet another reason for me to loathe Washingtonias. :rant:

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Gonzer

I'm surprised someone hasn't given the $#!@ thing a name!

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DoomsDave

St. Jude

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Hammer

I vote for "Gary Gonzer of Newport". A fitting tribute to those who care.

  • Upvote 1

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Tyrone

I think the palm community is split on this particular plant.

The Washingtonia will soak up moisture when the coconut doesn't need it in winter. But the summer water requirements will go up with those two in there.

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Zeeth

I'm surprised it made it this long without any irrigation in Southern California!

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Gonzer

I vote for "Gary Gonzer of Newport". A fitting tribute to those who care.

You'd think I'd have a stake in this since Newport is where I was hatched in '58 at Hoag.

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JEFF IN MODESTO

I remember seeing that washie planted about ten years or so thinking.... the end.

In my opinion, without that PITA , the coco would have been twice as large by now. Not on its death bed.

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Hammer

I vote for "Gary Gonzer of Newport". A fitting tribute to those who care.

You'd think I'd have a stake in this since Newport is where I was hatched in '58 at Hoag.

Yeah man. What gives?!

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_Keith

I guess you might never fully realize how cool I think this is, being as how Moose and I rag the Cali Coconut deal all the time. In Moose's case he just loves the Cali-Fl palmatition. In my case, just plain jealousy, lol. But I always pull for the underdog and would just love nothing better than to see this thing come back. Even if it never hangs a coconut up top, just seeing it stable would be ultra cool. If I had similar here, I would make at least a bi-monthly trip to give it some enriched water and love.

Bring that baby back fellas.

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