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Tyrone

My new place - almost a clean slate.

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Daryl

Hi Tyrone, welcome to Palmtalk! ;):lol:

Seriously, though, good to see you posting again. Your garden looks fantastic, and you have been hard at work obviously. No shortage of water there eh?

regards,

Daryl

 

 

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Rafael

Tyrone, i am delighted with your work overthere!

I began a new yard in 2014 too, in different conditions, then i understand very well that "after planting and yard conception" stage :interesting:

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Pedro 65

A lot of thought before "action"  very much shows Tyrone, Pritchardia's look  fantastic @ yours they hate it here, I have cut all ours down , and hows those already huge Rav Xero's, wow you must have been growing  them for some time in Perth. Glad to see the "best" looking Beccariophoenix is a goer down there, Madagascariensis of course.  Great Idea with all the Bamboo for not only wind breaks but "fantastic mulch. Im posting this pic co I reckon a Raphia ea side of the shed would look awesome, 1 of our Farinifera's is in full seed mode and will be ready soon and its "loaded". No need to say keep keen as looks like the move has made you even  keener, thanks for the update         and        " get ready" for the busloads of tourists from Albany to visit your  gardens with tea n scones  in 7 to 10 yrs... Anything   is po$$ible  now the Chinese fly daily to Oz for their holiday..  Pete  :)

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Tyrone

I agree Pedro about the Raphias, but would they go OK down here? What sort of minimums can they handle. They'd certainly love the soil and if I could pull it off, the WOW factor would be off the scale.

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Pedro 65
7 minutes ago, Tyrone said:

I agree Pedro about the Raphias, but would they go OK down here? What sort of minimums can they handle. They'd certainly love the soil and if I could pull it off, the WOW factor would be off the scale.

Tyrone, the gardens here get down to 3c but down at the water edge it gets to 0c and lower  and they dont flinch at all , also they are much larger there because of the "continuous" water where they love to send their roots out wide into the water . A plastic dome over them when young helps to get em crankn.. They will do fine.   Pete   :) 

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Tyrone
16 minutes ago, Pedro 65 said:

Tyrone, the gardens here get down to 3c but down at the water edge it gets to 0c and lower  and they dont flinch at all  . A plastic dome over them when young helps to get em crankn.. They will do fine.   Pete   :) 

Well that's settled then. Raphias here we come. :D

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Tyrone

I have other areas that I haven't posted pics of and one special one which represents the most protected part of the property. I had to take out 4 pine trees from the forest and that opened up a huge slab of land totally protected from harsh winds on 3 sides and north facing which will be planted up into a rainforest for more sensitive species such as Pinanga's, Arengas, Dypsis pembanas, some New Cal stuff, and Hyophorbe indicas. As it's north facing the winter sun is amazing in there, but in the summer it gets a bit more shade. I'm just clearing all the junk from this area at the moment. The previous owner left tonnes of junk laying everywhere.

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Tyrone

Well it was the first Saturday in Spring (and the first weekend in about 3 months that it hasn't rained) so I decided to plant my 3 Hyophorbe indica's that I was saving for a good spot.

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Tyrone

And then I threw in my Polyandrococus caudescens (now Allagoptera caudescens).

Now let's hope we get some sun and warmth.

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Monòver

Nice!

In my place is imposible to grow palms near pine trees. They drink the moisture and only drought tolerant palms can grow. Well, if i water every days is posible, but the water bill will be gorgeus!!!! Lol

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Daryl

Your soil there looks good Ty

Those indicas are rocket ships too eh?

 

Daryl

 

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Tyrone
2 hours ago, Monòver said:

Nice!

In my place is imposible to grow palms near pine trees. They drink the moisture and only drought tolerant palms can grow. Well, if i water every days is posible, but the water bill will be gorgeus!!!! Lol

Believe it or not, I've got standing water in the pine forest at the moment. I had to plant these palms high so they can drain away. If I dug down too deep they'd be sitting in the perched water table which is not good. If I dug down 250mm below the surface the bottom would have water in it at the moment. We've nearly had 900mm of rain this year, the wettest in about 20 years so they say. I will irrigate these in summer though.

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Tyrone
2 hours ago, Daryl said:

Your soil there looks good Ty

Those indicas are rocket ships too eh?

 

Daryl

 

Thanks Daryl. This area was the old compost heap from the previous owner. In this area I also composted all that Kikuyu grass that I cut out of the 1m high grass section in the corner of my property when we first moved in. Combined with the underlying peat and sheep manure it kind of came up alright. It drains well too. Should be perfect in summer when I will need to irrigate. Hopefully the water table will have dropped a bit by then. The indicas won't have to travel too far down to find it at the moment. I hope it's to there liking. If so, they should rocket off. They really needed planting out years ago.

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Peter G

Things are shaping up very nicely for you down there Ty!

Bec Mad is a slow grower for me too, after 5 years mine hasn't made much progress. I bought mine as a Alfie, the sellers in Darwin have been labelling them wrong. 

Nice sized Xerophila :)

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Pedro 65
On 7/4/2016, 9:35:59, Tyrone said:

I agree Pedro about the Raphias, but would they go OK down here? What sort of minimums can they handle. They'd certainly love the soil and if I could pull it off, the WOW factor would be off the scale.

 

On 7/4/2016, 9:45:52, Tyrone said:

Well that's settled then. Raphias here we come. :D

 

Tyrone, the Raphia seeds are near ready, I have 3 Farinifera's all in flower/seed so send a pm with your address nd I can send you plenty... Pete

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Tyrone

Not a palm but I planted out my Ravenala madagascariensis var Honkondambo today. I grew these from seed from RPS back about 6 years ago. They needed planting out 3 or 4 years ago. Amazingly these have survived and grown well in small pots up against the main house water tank and have taken hail, high winds and possibly frost. In the pine forest they should be completely protected from frost and high winds so I hope they become huge monsters and a back drop for the plantings that are yet to come. They will blend in well with the Strelitzia nicolai that I planted in more exposed areas. Strelitzia nicolai can handle some really cold conditions. My Bambusa vulgaris were defoliated but the Strelitzia nicolais are completely unphased. 

I'm starting to get excited by the new garden area and the possibilities.

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Tyrone

In went the Rhapis this weekend.

I ripped out a heap of dying hibiscus (too wet) and put in the Rhapis. Now Rhapis love water, but also drainage.  The top 400mm was humus rich soil added after the house was built and this layer sat on top of the house pad sand laid underneath. I dug through the top wet humus layer to expose the sand layer underneath. Water oozed out of the top layer and ran onto the sand layer and away. So I just dug up a bit of sand mixed it with sheep manure and backfilled the humus and sand and sheep manure mix back in. Hopefully that will be enough drainage for these Rhapis. If so, they should grow well and become a Rhapis hedge in time.

We've had so much rain (900mm so far) and when you're on peat and clay you notice every single mm of it. I can't mow the lawn at the moment. I need a hover mower.

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Tyrone

Some updates on the garden. Just some background info. Back in June 2017 when we were away in the uk, we had a very cold freeze event which the locals reckon was almost a once in a lifetime cold event. I assume in the open we hit a -3C or -4C minimum. After that we never went below zero. My Strelitzia nicolai's were seriously burnt but recovered. My Pritchardias looked torched but all survived and recovered. In a protected area all my Hyophorbe indicas took serious burns with one dying. The other two have recovered rapidly. I think they may have seen -2C. I lost a Howea under canopy and almost all had burns. Archontophoenix almost all burnt but have since recovered. The main stems on all my Pinangas took a serious hit with one dying, the rest have grown mostly from the suckers at the base. I had serious burn on Dypsis pembana and lost a couple. Dypsis lanceolata were burnt too with all recovering as are Dypsis plumosa. Amazing winners that showed no burn and continued to grow were Arenga westerhoutii and Syagrus pseudococus. My Phoenix roebellinis were all bronzed and damaged from the cold and have since recovered but the Beccariophoenix alfredii right next to them only barely tinged from the cold. They are one tough palm. I have one Chambeyronia houaloui that is still bifid that I planted out in the summer of 2017 into full sun and it tinged after a 40C day. It then was frozen and although small has still pushed spears since. When that gets big it's going to be a tough sucker.

The area in these pictures is the new area started in September 2016 with Ravenea madagascariensis and Hyophorbe indica. It now is complete with Alpinias, cycads, bromeliads, Chambeyronia, Chamaedoreas, Ravenea glauca, Dypsis, Arenga westerhoutii, and a Syagrus pseudococus.

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Tyrone

Archontophoenix future forest with shade cloth tent city. I planted these in May 2016 from shade and the winter sun burnt them. So in spring 2016 I put the tents up and this helped them recover. Then the freeze of 2017 burnt them but they have since recovered again and look really strong now. If we have a mild winter which it looks like we will they should really take off. Excuse the weeds.

Also my Beccariophoenix alfredii that saw the cold and laughed at it. You can see the damage on the older leaves of the Phoenix near by.

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Tyrone

Rhopalostylis pics. First one bauerii on left and Chatham Island sapida on right. Second pic R bauerii Kermadec Islands and third a R bauerii.

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Tyrone

Bismarckia and some Ravenea rivularis in a triangle.

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Tyrone

Chatham Island Nikau palm, the Butia growing like mad, and the dry gully with Ravenea rivularis, Archontophoenix and Livistona chinensis  on the banks.

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Tyrone

Baby Ceroxylon quindiense doing well, Beccariophoenix alfredii grouping with one Sabal texensis in there and Parajubaea sunkha

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Tyrone

Pritchardia lowreyana, Parajubaea torralyi, Parajubaea cocoides.

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Tyrone

Garden shot along the bank. I've got some karris growing some Brachychiton, and Magnolias as well as bamboo. This area is filling out well but needs much much more growth before I'll be satisfied. 

The next is a triple planted Dypsis decipiens area and the last a shot of the lake which is at record low levels. It's been dry and I have watered a lot. I'm not worried though as it's now cooling off and the rain has returned. I've been able to find submerged rubbish in the lake and remove it. Going to put in a 25000L tank which gets water from the in ground bore pump and will take rain water from the shed roof as well. I'll then pump off the tank. The lake can then be left undisturbed. It will refill almost overnight in July when the winter rains make it hard to drain anything away.

Thats it for now. I hope you liked the update.

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Tyrone

It's been a dry year. These pics are from May 1 this year. Admittedly I was irrigating off the lake, but last month I had my settlement tank installed to pump ground water into and I won't need to irrigate off the lake again.

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Tyrone

But it's all full again as of today and the stream is flowing.

 

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Tyrone

One of the tributaries full of water. A few weeds about though. The Rhopalostylis love this cold weather. Been really cold and wet the last few days, with small hail on and off. It only got to 11.7C yesterday which is cold even for here.

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Dave-Vero

Looking good.  I've skipped Australasia this year in favor of a rather expensive spring Japan tour with a loose group of mostly Japanese-Americans from Portland, Oregon.  Got to see Satakentias at home.  

Rhopalostylis are really nice palms, even if they take forever to grow.  I was really impressed by them at Paparoa National Park in NZ.  Anyway, next year's travels are in the works.  So far, a relatively cheap trip to Costa Rica in April.  January-March is sort of busy in my resort town, so maybe a July (winter) trip to Perth?  Got plenty of airline miles to the farthest  commercial airport from home base of Orlando.  And the airline allows a free second-city stop, so Perth and somewhere else.  

Your freeze damages are similar to what we'd see in this part of hot Florida, where there's some debate over hardiness of Beccariophoenix alfredii.  Our cold tends to be sudden and dry.  I was amazed to spot what looks like a booming Alcantarea imperialis.  They're from rock outcrops around Rio.  They seem happy with heat.  My two big ones are monsters, probably ready to flower.  

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Tyrone

Dave, bromeliads do awesome over here. I've got about 3 Alacanterea imperialis and they are an easy grow.

Even here our really cold events are when it is dry. If we get rain or moisture in the air, then we don't even approach zero Celsius.

B alfredii is bullet proof here. I love this species and need to fill the place up with them.

But our summers are really mild and cool compared to any part of Florida, so you'd be able to grow all of those heat loving species that I can't grow.

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sandgroper

Tyrone, your garden looks fantastic mate! A few years from now with all those palms growing around your lake it'll look like the lagoon from Gilligans Island.

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Dave-Vero

Your place is really coming along.

Of course Eric (of Leu Gardens) in Orlando reports seeing B. alfredii being planted widely in his town. I'm amazed.  Orlando gets to 35 regularly but never over 38.  Summer nights are always hot, above 21, which is hard on a lot of plants.  And they get hard freezes, even though Eric's "urban heat island" really is taking effect.

A. imperialis is quite the showpiece wherever it is.  Blessedly, I can't imagine it becoming a pest anywhere.  

Your Butia looks like our usual "Butia capitata" when young, silvery, and looking like a fountain.  But it's hard to tell.  Most of the plants in the southeastern US seem to be the same species, but there's a lot of diversity in Uruguay and the southern states of Brazil.  More places to visit.

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Tyrone
4 hours ago, Dave-Vero said:

Your place is really coming along.

Of course Eric (of Leu Gardens) in Orlando reports seeing B. alfredii being planted widely in his town. I'm amazed.  Orlando gets to 35 regularly but never over 38.  Summer nights are always hot, above 21, which is hard on a lot of plants.  And they get hard freezes, even though Eric's "urban heat island" really is taking effect.

A. imperialis is quite the showpiece wherever it is.  Blessedly, I can't imagine it becoming a pest anywhere.  

Your Butia looks like our usual "Butia capitata" when young, silvery, and looking like a fountain.  But it's hard to tell.  Most of the plants in the southeastern US seem to be the same species, but there's a lot of diversity in Uruguay and the southern states of Brazil.  More places to visit.

Thanks Dave. I've never recorded a minimum here as high as 20C at all. I think the warmest was a 19.4C and that has most town people complaining of "how muggy it was last night". A warm night here is 16C or above, whereas in Perth in summer that would be a cool night. Also because there is ocean all around this section of coast, the only dry hot winds come from the north on occasion. To the south the ocean is 9kms away, the east about 25kms and about the same to the west. So an easterly wind pattern that would normally bring hot dry winds to Perth, brings cool moist winds often with low cloud down here. It took a bit of getting used too, having lived in Perth nearly my whole life.

I'm really happy with that Butia. The previous owner planted it along with the canariensis which are now getting some size to them. The Butia produces sweet fruit. It's really taken off since we've been here. It's amazing what a bit of irrigation and fertiliser can do.

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Daryl

Hi Tyrone, the garden is looking great! That lake is a beauty, but I can't get over how much it dropped!

 

Daryl

 

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Dave-Vero

I once was mowing the lawn, brushed by a Butia, and the tip of a leaflet pierced my left eardrum.  It healed spontaneously (with the doctor keeping an eye on it).

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Tyrone

Some more pics taken this week

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Tyrone

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Tyrone

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Tyrone

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Tyrone

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