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Tyrone

My new place - almost a clean slate.

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Tyrone

Here's some pics from the Atherton Tablelands when we went there in 2005. This is the habitat of Archontophoenix maxima and Laccospadix australasica. But the pics are of Oraniopsis in full glory.

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Mike in Nelson

Good luck with your new patch, Tyrone. Keep chipping away over the years and you'll be amazed at what you've achieved. I see there was a row Pinus radiata? I've often wondered how far north/south toward the equator they would grow.

Edited by Mike in Nelson

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Tyrone

Thanks Mike. The Pinus radiata is a bit of a forest on the property. About 100 trees at a guess. It kind of feels like a set on "Vikings" in there. It's a great windbreak from the cold south easterlies. They'd grow in NZ surely??

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Mike in Nelson

Thanks Mike. The Pinus radiata is a bit of a forest on the property. About 100 trees at a guess. It kind of feels like a set on "Vikings" in there. It's a great windbreak from the cold south easterlies. They'd grow in NZ surely??

Certainly do. They grow a bit too well actually. It's the main timber for export and construction over here. Unfortunately, radiata seeds everywhere and encroaches on native bush.

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Tyrone

Thanks Mike. The Pinus radiata is a bit of a forest on the property. About 100 trees at a guess. It kind of feels like a set on "Vikings" in there. It's a great windbreak from the cold south easterlies. They'd grow in NZ surely??

Certainly do. They grow a bit too well actually. It's the main timber for export and construction over here. Unfortunately, radiata seeds everywhere and encroaches on native bush.

OK. Similar climates we have then. They used to be the main type of timber grown in WA, until the Tasmanian Blue Gum came along. We have the same issue of Pinus radiata just colonising the bush areas. The black cockatoos love the cones and seeds and often fly the cones around dropping them in bush areas where they sprout.

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Peter G

How's the new garden shaping up Ty?

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Tyrone

Well, it's been a very long time between updates. Over 2 years. I've slowly been pulling this place into shape, and there still is tons to do yet. We've had an enormous amount of rain here and you'll see from the pics. I've had to dig drains and try to get standing water out of certain areas. So some of the palm shots have them sitting in water but just yesterday they were high and dry.

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Tyrone

These 3 Beccariophoenix are not pristine but their healthy. I planted these from shade into full sun in October last year and as expected they burnt a bit until December, January when they started to get with the program and take to the full sun conditions.

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Tyrone

Close ups of the 3 Beccies. I love this species.

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Tyrone

This Beccariophoenix alfredii was my first planted here back in May last year just as we entered cool weather. It's sitting in water at the moment as the lake has broken it's banks (hopefully that'll be gone tomorrow) but it has never stopped growing even through the coldest part of winter. I can't wait to plant some more of this species and these to get enormous. For me they appear bulletproof. I need to cut the bamboo back a bit too. This bamboo screen has grown like mad and one of the best things I ever did here. It also doesn't mind sitting in water through winter.

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Tyrone

Parajubaea sunkha which looks like it loves it here, even when it's wet.

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Tyrone

Parajubaea torralyi which I think doesn't even notice winter here at all.

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Tyrone

This Butia was already here when we moved in. But after regular irrigation and fertiliser (things it never had before) it just went beserk and is now flowering like a Syagrus, all year round. The fruit is good too and I've already made a few bottles of wine from the fruit, with another 30 bottles just a 23L fermenter away.

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Tyrone

My one and only Hedyscepe that I planted last weekend. As a pot plant it has been very happy down here. Now it is time to unleash it. I wish I had more of them.

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Tyrone

This area is a semi shaded area that will get dappled light in summer but not full sun. It is home to my Hedyscepe, R bauerii's, Chambeyronia macrocarpa var hookeri, and some Kermadec Island R bauerii's. At the moment all sitting in water even though they are on top of a raised area. It will have mostly drained away by tomorrow, provided it stops raining.

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Tyrone

Parajubaea cocoides. It's happy here in full sun. This palm has experienced a few 40C plus days too. Always green.

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Tyrone

Jubaeopsis caffra. A steady performer that doesn't miss a beat. This too is in full sun and has experienced a few 40C plus days.

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Tyrone

Another Parajubaea torralyi that was one of 3 that I separated from a community pot. They don't like root disturbance at all, so I honestly thought I'd lose the lot, but amazingly I didn't lose one, although one came close. All 3 are planted on the side of the top lake, but here is the strongest one. You'll notice the "stream" next too it. That is a drain I dug a couple of weeks back to take the runoff from the neighbours paddock away from it. It was just filling up with water. Not good for Parajubaea but it didn't seem to care. I didn't want to push my luck though.

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Tyrone

Rainforest stream area. Archontophoenix alexandrae, maxima, cunninghamiana, Livistona australis, chinensis, Arenga engleri, Rhopalostylis bauerii, Rhopalostylis sapida (Chatham Island) and tree ferns. You probably can't see them all but they are in there and in time I will fit more in.

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Tyrone

This is the main stream into the main lake in full flood. I have planted Archontophoenix alexandrae, cunninghamiana, Ravenea rivularis, Livistona chinensis and eventually will put in some tree ferns once the canopy plants get up there a bit. These were planted in May and came out of shade. I knew they would burn and so I hope they will get used to it by the warm season and turn out to be stocky sunhardened healthy individuals. This area is protected from most of the cold winds and in summer can get quite hot, but doesn't ever dry right out. There is always ground moisture here.

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Tyrone

Another angle of the same area but looking into the Archo forest I planted on the flat flood plain next to the main stream. Again things have burnt here from the sun, and I may lose a couple of plants, but the ones that live I hope will rock on. :)

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Tyrone

The entrance to my bamboo walkway. I get bad cold air drainage here and the winds used to just roar through from the west when a cold front came through. I still needed vehicle access though and I needed to block the wind/cold. So instead of making a straight line with a vehicle access gap in the middle, I created an S-bend which a vehicle could drive through, with a wall of bamboo on either side. About halfway through the S bend I ran another row of bamboo back at right angles to create an inner courtyard near the house that I've planted a few citrus in and I've left enough space near the main lake edge that is north facing to plant palms in front of the bamboo. The bamboo should get 18m tall so everything on the lake side of the bamboo should be really protected. This picture is the entrance to the bamboo walkway with the 3 Beccariophoenix shown earlier on the left just as you enter it.

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Tassie_Troy1971

Looks like you have been very busy Tyrone and are growing all the same palms that i am. Have you planted D decipiens

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Tyrone
1 hour ago, Tassie_Troy1971 said:

Looks like you have been very busy Tyrone and are growing all the same palms that i am. Have you planted D decipiens

Hi Troy. Yes and yes. Some decipiens pictures soon.

Sorry for the delay. I just had to help my wife put some pine chips into the chook pen as it was a slushy mess in there from all the rain and I also had to unblock the outflow grate from the main lake. I had to put that in their to stop my trout leaving the property. If it blocks up though it could flood the property. I think I need to make some sort of fail safe device to stop that from ever happening.

Heres the bridge entrance complete with a Sabal on either side. I bought these two as S palmetto but I think one is minor. What do you think? Am I right. Anyway they are now sitting in water. I hope they don't mind it.

 

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Tyrone

Now to the island.

This is my one and only Pritchardia lowreyana that I grew from seed. It seems to be OK.

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Tyrone

Two Caryota gigas. I love these palms, and so do many non palm people who visit.

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Tyrone

Beccariophoenix fenestralis. This one got beaten up when I brought it down here. The wind ripped it, it went yellow, I thought it was finished. Anyway I gave it heaps of iron sulphate, iron chelates, chelated micro nutrients, NPK, lots of water and it greened right up and kept growing the poor thing. I checked the soil pH the other day. 3.7. Anyone for orange juice. That's some seriously sour soil, so I will need to up the pH somehow and get it the nutrients it needs. The low pH is due to the iron sulphate I poured over the thing, but 3.7 is WAY too low. The natural soil here is about 5.1-5.6. The island is pure peat. But I think this one may be here to stay. Since I've planted it, I planted some bamboos on the island to slow the wind speed right down, so now it doesn't rip as much. But if I can get some calcium into the leaves the new leaves should stiffen up a bit more. Maybe not to a Parajubaea's level but stiffer anyway.

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Tyrone

Beccariophoenix madagascariensis. A seriously slow palm, although looking back at pictures of when I first planted it, it has grown. These things are tough. I have another planted out which I won't show as it doesn't look as good but it's deep green. It virtually blew apart in the wild winds we had here before I had any wind breaks up. But it didn't die and if it's made it this far I think it will live. This one will take forever to get big but it looks OK. B alfredii is definitely the faster alternative down here.

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Tyrone

Roystonea borinquena. This palm is amazing. I think I was pushing it at 35S. Not long after I started this thread in June 2014, we had a frost. The frost was so bad the bridge froze and the island had ice on it at least in the non canopy areas. This surprised me as I didn't think frost would happen on the island surrounded by warmer water. I was wrong. This Roystonea had crunchy ice on it right to the base. I thought I'd come home to a black mushy pile of crap collapsed on the ground. Well I came home expecting the worst and saw no change. I waited days thinking the reaction may be delayed. Nothing happened. I thought I'd get to summer and see the thing do nothing at all. I was wrong. It pushed a spear and opened a leaf. I was amazed. It actually appears to be picking up speed too. It's base is fattening up too. I'm really surprised by this one and now there is some wind protection for it I expect it should get stronger. Only time will tell.

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Pip

That's an awesome project Tyrone. Will be fun watching those palms grow.

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Tyrone

Rhopalostylis bauerii var cheesemanii. These things should rock here. I can't wait for these to take off.

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Tyrone

More Rhopies. Such an easy grow down here.

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Tyrone

This is my Dypsis decipiens hill. I had to put them on a hill for drainage reasons. I have 14 in the ground planted in volcano style. The hill is clay removed when the lake was dug, so planting them into the clay is not going to work. Eventually I will mulch around the volcanoes with free draining organics to help provide some decent soil and continue the good drainage. I also have a few Encephalartos on the hill that love the position. On the right hand side I have some Ravenea xerophila. So maybe one day in the distant future they'll flower and fruit. This is a full sun area and in the summer can get very hot, something they just love.

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Tyrone

One of my unusual Dypsis decipiens with regular close leaflets. I only have one. It has very red spears too. I grew most of these from seed. I will plant some D ambositrae in the "transitional forest" I will create to the left of these decipiens. To the left of them will be a much shadier area that will become a darker rainforest area.

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Tyrone

Ravenea xerophila in a grouping. Hopefully they'll thrive and set seed one day.

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Tyrone

Butia in fruit and a triple of Bismarckia continuing the blue theme of this area.

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Tyrone

 2 Pritchardia affinis I think, doing well.

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Tyrone

A picture of the island.

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Tyrone

Bamboo wall.

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Tyrone

Inside the bamboo barrier.

Since I started this thread in 2014 I've recorded a lowest minimum of −0.7C (just the other day). The day that froze the borinquena was likely a bit colder than that, but I wasn't recording temps at that time. Now I have more vegetation the plants are more protected. The maximum temp I've recorded is 43C but we never have warm nights. I've never recorded a min over 19.6C. Humidity is medium to high all year round here. Fog and heavy dews can even happen in summer. Although summers are generally dry, we can still get decent rainfall in summer. Our water tank which is our water supply here overflowed about 12 times this last summer. Winter is wet with mins around 6-8C and max's around 18-20C. Summers are drier with mins around 14-16C and max's around 28-30C with generally high humidity. We are nothing like Albany or the airport weather site here.

That's all for now. :)

 

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