Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Palm crazy

Side Yards don’t have to be boring.

Recommended Posts

Palm crazy

One thing about living in the city is you can do some pretty cool things with the side of the house.

No need to make that trip to the back boring. Space here is narrow.

DSC00003_zpsf36d011a.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
_Keith

Love it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
mulungu

How beautiful! What is that with the orange flowers? Great place for the feeder. I imagine such a side yard would be very welcoming for wildlife, which would be refreshing in the city.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DoomsDave

You demonstrate well!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Palm crazy

Thanks guys, the orange vine is just a honeysuckle the hummers like.

You can’t tell yet, but in this long narrow space there are several trachycarpus, one waggie, three butia one is silver, JxB is still small.

In another month I’ll be able to see some of the tender cordylines that died this winter there just starting to regrow. The long term goal is to make the path way out of moss. I’ve starting putting coconut fiber on the ground to give the moss something to grow on. Will take a few years before it looks the way I want. But it should be pretty low maintenance with lots of color and green combined.

Thanks for looking. :happy:

Edited by Palm crazy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alicehunter2000

Yes, I like it too. Cool things growing up there in the Pacific Northwest....no pun intended.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Stevetoad

Very nice! April of last year I did something similar to my side yard. I still need to finish up the path though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Palm crazy

Dave that made me chuckle, thanks.

Steve love to see how your side yard is turning out. Lots of example on the net for side yard. This side of the yard is seen from the living room and the dinning room window, only a few years old but I like it since it pretty low maintenance and green all year.

Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tropicdoc

I get moss growing naturally everywhere I consistently spray round up. Just FYI that might be a way to get it going. Btw, are you saying cordylines such as ti are root hardy?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Palm crazy

I get moss growing naturally everywhere I consistently spray round up. Just FYI that might be a way to get it going. Btw, are you saying cordylines such as ti are root hardy?

Moss grows here naturally in shade, but this area is a little to sunny in summer so it goes dormant and returns in fall. In full shade the moss is evergreen here.

Cordyline australis & hybrids. Comes from Australia; N. Zealand. They don’t like high heat-humidity but do good on the west coast. Hardy to 18F-20F. root hardy to 10F-15F.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Palm crazy

Some of the Palms and exotic in this side yard most are doing good.

schefflera delavayi

DSC00031_zps7b23f01a.jpg

Banana growing nicely. Should take off now that the warmer days are here to stay.

DSC00026_zpsfe509483.jpg

Livistona nitida lost all its leaves this winter, but the spear was solid, growing back fast.

DSC00024_zps970d9028.jpg

Small Jubaea x Butia f2 finally in the ground no damage this winter.

DSC00018_zpsc4409404.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Palm crazy

Butia going on three years. Two look the same.

DSC00021_zpsce7b68ad.jpg

Hard to see but the Silver butia is behind the green one.

DSC00012_zpsfd0b9a35.jpg

My first ever waggie, not as slow growing as I thought it would be.

DSC00015_zpsb800ff13.jpg[/uR

L]

DSC00009_zpsc5f6fac6.jpg

Will update in a few months on the palms.

Peace and happy gardening :greenthumb:

Edited by Palm crazy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alicehunter2000

Please name the flowering plants in the last picture.....been going on a flower kick around here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Palm crazy

Please name the flowering plants in the last picture.....been going on a flower kick around here.

David the flowering tree we already discussed before not heat tolerant for you…(Embothrium coccineum), fuchsia cardinal is heat tolerant, and the cool looking hot pink plant is a new one called (Digiplexis ‘Illumination flame’) a new cross with the native foxglove and cross with Canary island foxglove. Outer color is hot pink and the inside and throat is light orange very striking plant should be at least hardy to z8?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
WestCoastGal

PalmCrazy your far North garden never ceases to amaze in looks and greenery and what you are able to grow. Too bad your new canna hasn't bloomed yet. Would like to see a photo of it in your garden when it does. The pink should be a great complement to your other pink flowering plant. Our Canna intrigues in the back yard BTW have been in bloom for a while now, with our heat, and are probably 8-9 feet tall now. Your musa looks pretty tall already. What variety is it?

Thought since I haven't posted photos in while I would hop on your thread, hope you don't mind, and show a side yard comparison a bit further south--cold/wet/lush--hot/dry/minimal. Our side yard is on the west side of our stucco house and pretty much a furnace during the hot inland summers. This summer has seen 90s/100s but a lot more days of 70s/80s than recent years. We did experience lows of about 24F this past winter and had continuous nights of freezing temps which affected some of our less hardy 9b plants in our back and front yard. Very little rain, and love the little bit of fog we've gotten off and on.

The majority of our softscaping was done last year, and I can't wait until our side yard mule can offer more shade. It does like the heat and has put out a number of fronds since being planted. The sabal has done great as well. Several new fronds and inflorescence along the way. The cycas revoluta flushed this spring (didn't know if it would this soon after being planted, we did fertilize). Here's a before and after.

post-5191-0-57282100-1404772217_thumb.jp 06/29/13 post-5191-0-46987600-1404772266_thumb.jp Taken recently

Across from the palm bed is a small bed which takes full sun all afternoon long on the stucco. We planted an Anigozanthos Big Red here. OMG this plant just loves the heat. Every time we walk past it, we can't believe how gorgeous it is. Both the kangaroo paws and the torches in the palm bed are hummingbird favorites. It's been fun watching this Big Red grow to be taller than me (probably just over 6 feet) and it's snake-like floral stems are fascinating to see weave in and out and eventually rise up straightened. Highly recommend to those of you who have a hot area that needs something. Needs good drainage. Since we haven't had rain in a while we hope we will be okay on that front.

post-5191-0-07373200-1404772728_thumb.jp 10/24/13 post-5191-0-44064700-1404772624_thumb.jp 06/04/13

You can see the snaking stems in the above recent photo

post-5191-0-95707500-1404772786_thumb.jp post-5191-0-37523100-1404772807_thumb.jp from today

We liked Big Red so much we just added a few A. Tequilla Sunrises planted between our backyard bed of Strelitzia reginae (orange birds of paradise). These get a western sun exposure on the stucco background so feel they will do well there too.

That's pretty much our side yard, not very large. Not a lot of variety. Hopefully not so boring. Really wanted a tropical look with minimal care and low water requirements. Our back yard contains our larger palms, another sabal, canna, SunPatiens, bamboo, leucadendron...and thankfully what we planted for the most part has just thrived for us in our heat and cold. Some of you probably remember the two mules in the back yard that were our first anchoring palms when we first started all this a few years ago. Here's an updated photo of one of the mules as you look from the side yard to the back yard. It seems to be doing well despite a vole that caused all kinds of issues for the trunk.

post-5191-0-85233500-1404775287_thumb.jp

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Palm crazy

Hi W.C.G. most of the cannas here need a few more weeks till they bloom. I’m trying canna musafolia this year so far looks good. The banana is just a musa basjoo they really grow back fast even when killed to the ground, Other ones I am trying are. M. skkimensis red tiger; M. sp. Helen’s hybrid a hardy edible; Mekong giant just a one gallon.

WOW! Your mules have really gotten big and are looking magnificent. Really adds to that tropical Cali feel. Great selection with the red hot pokers, there so easy and low maintenance but look really exotic when they bloom. Wish I could grow kangaroo paws like that, just to cold-cloudy here in winter. But they do give the hummers something to eat in your garden.

Thanks for sharing your side garden is Fantastic.

Musa basjoo update second year in the ground.

DSC00009-1_zps7f7aaa08.jpg

Ginger tara

DSC00015_zps10afab78.jpg

Cordylines growing back.

DSC00010_zps3c68e67c.jpg

Some more recovering.

DSC00015-1_zps75ad1e9a.jpg

Edited by Palm crazy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Palm crazy

OH yeah, I almost forgot the new canna is just starting to show a flower bud. Cool this week low 80’s but next week big heat waves coming so should be soon.

DSC00006_zps4fc42950.jpg

Waggie update love this palm.

DSC00028_zpsa41aedc9.jpg

Edited by Palm crazy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Palm crazy

The Heat is already here….http://www.weather.com/weather/tenday/98501 the nights are a little lower at the airport, in town night temps even warmer.

So Glad I have micro sprinkler to do the watering for me. This month is the beginning of the heat loving palm growing season it last about 3 months, LOL!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

  • Similar Content

    • GregVirginia7
      By GregVirginia7
      Pretty sure this is squirrel damage...

      I noticed several fronds drooping and thought it a natural shed and this was part of the process, but the “ shed” was painfully asymmetrical. Upon closer inspection, I found this! It gnawed the underside of the petiole, thus causing the collapse.

      Tell you what, squirrel pot pie sounds great about now. The symmetry of my palm is being ruined. It hasn’t hit the upper third...yet but I’m sending out a dinner alert for all those red tailed hawks that are visiting for the winter. Honestly, of all the things that could happen...mulling splint supports...maybe a baffle (which should really add to the beauty of my palm) any other suggestions?
    • Zoltan
      By Zoltan
      I see some people say Dypsis Lucentes usda zone 10 and up.I disasagree with that at least here in Florida.
      In St Augustine by Aligator farm entrance you can see many of them.I talked to the zoo and they told me they planted them maybe 15 yrs ago as 5-7 gallons by now they are tall maybe 12 feet or more.You can see them from A1A. But also you see some in downtown around the belive or not.This is usda zone 9a .But if this is not enough,I live in Jacksonville at oceanway which is east of 95 ,we have on Pulaski rd zip code 32218 by church for minimum 10 yrs  about 10 -12 feet tall. planted right by entrance the wall.  And if this is still not enough at Jacksonville Airport at Hilton has at pool backside of the building w/o any protection beside it planted right by the building.So I think if you place it on sunny side and close to building it can tolarete all the way to Jacksonville. I don’t have any idea about 8b zone like west of Nort Florida or Ga …Also I know a person listed close to Jacksonville airport she planted a Dypsis decaying “ triangle palm “ back in 1990 right by her house.It’s made it eversince and it’s way taller than her house.She protected at beginning heat pad etc .She has some photo at palmtalk . I have 2 of them I never heated them ,but covered however I can’t cover anymore they are out of reach .Over 12 feet or so.I got them from Home Depot 3 or 4 years ago.Even leaves get touched they come back nicely.Mine not planted by house but by fence and it get early sun till late afternoon sun…

    • Paradise Found
      By Paradise Found
      I've been thinking of planting one soon.  and like to know if anyone else has any experience with them in the PNW? Good or Bad results. 
    • GregVirginia7
      By GregVirginia7
      Are there distinguishing characteristics for this Trachy? I’ve read they have thicker trunks and bright yellow tips on their more rigid leaf segments?
    • GregVirginia7
      By GregVirginia7
      Don’t talk much about my Needle palm but it’s really grown into a nice three larger, two smaller clump of trunks...three trunks are about 12” and the other two are smaller but it’s gone from about a 3’ high by 2’ wide in-ground experiment in 2014 to a 5x 5 picture of health today...what a fantastic cold hardy palm. Aside from a bit of protection its first winter, it’s faced every winter on its own. Surprisingly, the main trunk died a couple years after planting but the suckers prospered...
      First winter:


      Somewhere in the middle:


      To present:




      Anyway, sitting at the base of a slight slope, it gets a fair share of runoff and I dug some depressions around it to collect even more water...it’s good for the basjoo, too...I highly recommend Needles but keep the needles in mind where pets and children are concerned...they’re vicious...but in the right zone and situated in the right place, a reliable and dependable choice for cold hardy palm growers.


×
×
  • Create New...